Portable Version



  • Will there be a portable version of the browser?



  • There is already one.
    Click advanced in the setup and you can choose a portable installation.



  • Where it says "Install standalone"?

    I did not realize that this will install the portable version. Thanks for the hint, i will give it a try!



  • Not quite portable :blink: ….If you move the installation folder to a different drive/folder it still tries to write the profile folder to the original place it was installed. You need to edit this file: …\vivaldi\Application\stp.viv each time you move it.



  • And I can't get it to run from a networked drive. Taskmanager shows vivaldi process running but the gui doesn't appear. Shame. Firefox remains the only portable browser I can get to reliably run from a networked drive. Really useful in the environment I work in.



  • Ok, i understand. Will there be a portable version that runs completely off of a folder?



  • @RickDangerous:

    Ok, i understand. Will there be a portable version that runs completely off of a folder?

    Having the chrome/blink core makes this difficult going by things I've read on portableapps forum



  • I am running Vivaldi as portable installation.

    This were the steps:

    • Download the setup file
    • Right click on it and choose "Extract to…" (i am usig 7zip)
    • Now extract "vivaldi.7z"
    • Start "vivaldi.exe"

    But its not really portable. Perhaps there is an folder in Users/AppData



  • Why don't you simply use the "Extended"-button during installation? Everything is already there.



  • @Ralf-Brinkmann:

    Why don't you simply use the "Extended"-button during installation? Everything is already there.

    …because i thought this method would be "portable" and everything is in one folder. ;)



  • everything in one folder is very important.



  • @Ralf-Brinkmann:

    Why don't you simply use the "Extended"-button during installation? Everything is already there.

    "Extended-button"? Did you mean "Advanced" or did I miss something? :)

    I've tried both methods (i.e. "standalone installation" using the installer and "unpacking"). The results were disapponting. The "standalone installation" creates an installation in one folder but as soon as I move this folder and start Vivaldi from the new location, it creates a folder "Vivaldi" with subfolder "Profile" at the place where the standalone installation was originally located. The result of the unpacking method is a version that creates a profile folder in "User/AppData/Local".



  • Yes, "Advanced". Sorry. And I didn't try to move my Vivaldi folder.



  • Pity it wasn't me who missed the right button. I really hoped it was my mistake. :)
    Well, I will continue using Vivaldi standalone (at least it keeps its profile folder within the installation folder) and won't try to move the Vivaldi folder. That's good enough for me for testing. I hope there will be an official solution for this problem later on or at least a solid workaround.



  • @tardigrada:

    it creates a folder "Vivaldi" with subfolder "Profile" at the place where the standalone installation was originally located

    So it works for someone who uses this for a USB installation, right? Off the top of my head I can't imagine a situation where you'd need to move the folder within one system.



  • @Celeblhach:

    @tardigrada:

    it creates a folder "Vivaldi" with subfolder "Profile" at the place where the standalone installation was originally located

    So it works for someone who uses this for a USB installation, right?

    I don't know, I haven't tried it yet.

    Actually only because you can't think of any situation when one would need to move the installation folder around the same system, it doesn't necessarily means that this situation is completely irrelevant for everyone else. :) The problem is not so much the missing possibility of moving the folder around the same system, but moving it at all. If it is a problem on the same system it may be a problem when you try to use it on a USB medium. Apparently even the "standalone installation" uses absolute paths.



  • @Celeblhach:

    @tardigrada:

    it creates a folder "Vivaldi" with subfolder "Profile" at the place where the standalone installation was originally located

    So it works for someone who uses this for a USB installation, right? Off the top of my head I can't imagine a situation where you'd need to move the folder within one system.

    Except… if the pattern runs true that the path listed in the stp.viv file identifies where Vivaldi goes, an entry like: f:\Programs\vivaldi1 (written to a flash stick on a system that assigned the f: term because that was the first available drive slot when the flash stick was plugged in for the Vivaldi install) may have some issues when later plugged into another system where the first available drive term for the flash stick may be e:

    I haven't experimented yet with this either, though if the drive letter is hard-written to the installation's file, it must matter somewhere to Vivaldi. That seems likely to cause an issue if a flash stick is later inserted as a different drive letter.

    Perhaps the issue is that a stand-alone install is not necessarily a portable install.



  • That's exactly the point.

    You can change the path in the "stp.viv" file from whatever it is to ".." (without quote marks of course). That's a nice workaround I've recently found for this portability problem.

    BTW, what else should be a "standalone-install" than a "portable install"?



  • @tardigrada:

    That's exactly the point.

    You can change the path in the "stp.viv" file from whatever it is to ".." (without quote marks of course). That's a nice workaround I've recently found for this portability problem.

    BTW, what else should be a "standalone-install" than a "portable install"?

    Indeed.

    A portabe install must have relative paths, "by design" or can't be called portable.



  • @tardigrada:

    … BTW, what else should be a "standalone-install" than a "portable install"?

    I've long used stand-alone installs of old Opera (and now Vivaldi) on a multi-user-account system simply for its compactness and… uhmm... stand-alone-ness (ie: separateness from the OS). On such a system (aimed mainly at a single user), all the user accounts have access both to the browser via shortcuts and to its single, commonly-held data-set without separate user account file-sets being scattered all over the hard drive. It makes rapid and frequent data backups much easier. Likewise, it puts far fewer (if any) hooks into the OS by being a stand-alone install. But such an install is hardly portable, since it's on the main hard drive, not a flash stick. A stand-alone program is usually blissfully unaware of other stand-alone versions of the same software on the same system, if that becomes desirable (which it was with old Opera) for comparisons.

    Quite frankly, if I could do it with everything else on the system, they'd nearly all be stand-alone as well. Multiple user accounts in such a single-user case are mainly useful for compartmentalizing data file access and limiting system damage in the case of external compromise. Granted, on shared systems where different users access different accounts, the situation is different. Likewise, certain default aspects of the system may not be available, since a stand-alone install is not intimately linked into the OS (or at least, not nearly so) as compared with a fully integrated install.


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