Vivaldi scores highest on HTML5Test.com



  • I've just tested the latest Vivaldi snapshot at http://html5test.com and got a score of 503/555, which is more than any other desktop result recorded in the test's database (can be found [url=http://html5test.com/results/desktop.html]here[/url]). That's impressive! Of course, there's still a lot of work to be done before Vivaldi is stable enough, but I want to congratulate the Team on this great success. Thanks for your great work, guys!



  • FWIW, I just tried it and got 523/555 with 32-bit Vivaldi 1.0.151.7 on 32-bit Win7 laptop with Intel P8400 Dual Core (2.26GHz), 2GB RAM, & Mobile Intel 4 Series 32MB on-board graphics.

    (I don't know enough about it to have any idea why it would be even higher on my setup. I included the machine specs, as I don't know which, if any, might be relevant.)


  • Moderator

    It mainly depends on the flags you enabled in your browser.



  • @Christoph142:

    It mainly depends on the flags you enabled in your browser.

    Mine are just the defaults.



  • I am also seeing a score of 523 with the most recent 32-bit Vivaldi, build 151.7 — the previous build 142,32 scored only 518, which was one less than Opera 28.



  • Last time I tried Chrome I got 526 with it, so still a bit behind, but Vivaldi is easily in the top three browsers when it comes to HTML5 support, nice. =)



  • On my PC:

    Vivaldi, Sleipnir 6, and Google Chrome all score 523. Opera 28, 29, and 30 score 519. Firefox Nightly scores 468, where Firefox scores 467. Internet Explorer 11 scores 341.

    I have 25 browsers installed, and I tested all of them. Here are the results if anyone else is interested:

    !
    Opera 11 - 202
    QupZilla - 275
    Opera 12.17 - 338
    Lunascape - 340
    Internet Explorer 11 - 341
    Polarity - 355
    Comodo IceDragon - 414
    SeaMonkey - 432
    Maxthon Cloud Browser - 467
    Mozilla Firefox - 467
    Firefox Nightly - 468
    Yandex Alhpa - 471
    Maxthon Nitro - 476
    Comodo Dragon - 486
    Chromodo - 486
    Torch - 486
    Yandex - 513
    Sleipnir 4 - 516
    Opera 28 - 519
    Opera 29 - 519
    Opera 30 - 519
    Tungsten - 522
    Google Chrome - 523
    Sleipnir 6 - 523
    Vivaldi - 523



  • @Tiamarth:

    I have 25 browsers installed, and I tested all of them. Here are the results if anyone else is interested:

    !
    Opera 11 - 202
    QupZilla - 275
    Opera 12.17 - 338
    Lunascape - 340
    Internet Explorer 11 - 341
    Polarity - 355
    Comodo IceDragon - 414
    SeaMonkey - 432
    Maxthon Cloud Browser - 467
    Mozilla Firefox - 467
    Firefox Nightly - 468
    Yandex Alhpa - 471
    Maxthon Nitro - 476
    Comodo Dragon - 486
    Chromodo - 486
    Torch - 486
    Yandex - 513
    Sleipnir 4 - 516
    Opera 28 - 519
    Opera 29 - 519
    Opera 30 - 519
    Tungsten - 522
    Google Chrome - 523
    Sleipnir 6 - 523
    Vivaldi - 523

    Wow, 25 browsers!!! I can barely keep up with 3 or 4. :P

    Thanks for posting that. Very interesting, and it looks like we're all getting the same 523 score with Vivaldi 1.0.151.7, regardless of hardware (and maybe OS).

    …So (if you know) where does any of this translate into practical/noticeable differences for the browser user?



  • @gdveggie:

    Wow, 25 browsers!!! I can barely keep up with 3 or 4. :P

    Thanks for posting that. Very interesting, and it looks like we're all getting the same 523 score with Vivaldi 1.0.151.7, regardless of hardware (and maybe OS).

    …So (if you know) where does any of this translate into practical/noticeable differences for the browser user?

    Well, HTML5 is the most recent iteration of HTML, which is basically the language websites are built in. The higher a browser scores on the website OP linked, the more compatible a browser is with HTML, the more websites it can display the way the creators wanted them to be displayed.

    Opera 11 probably displays several websites differently than browsers with much higher scores. Google, for example, ended up reverting their search engine in order to support browsers that couldn't support HTML5.

    !

    P.S. I have so many browsers installed because, when Opera became Opium, I wanted a new browser that could do what Opera did - I never felt completely satisfied. The closest I could get before Vivaldi was Maxthon. I never uninstalled those browsers because now I'm genuinely interested in the direction a few of them are headed, I'm loyal to a couple of brand names, and having a lot of browsers to test a website in never hurt anyone :D



  • @Tiamarth:

    Well, HTML5 is the most recent iteration of HTML, which is basically the language websites are built in. The higher a browser scores on the website OP linked, the more compatible a browser is with HTML, the more websites it can display the way the creators wanted them to be displayed.

    Opera 11 probably displays several websites differently than browsers with much higher scores. Google, for example, ended up reverting their search engine in order to support browsers that couldn't support HTML5.

    !

    OK, so it sounds higher HTML5test.com scores are generally less about speed, per se, and more about how (and whether) content is displayed. (?)

    If so, then is the evolution toward HTML5 on more and more sites one of the main reasons Opera (11.x/12.x) successfully displays and functions satisfactorily on fewer and fewer sites? And if so, how can I verify that this is a reason for display/function problems on sites I visit using Opera 12.x? (I mean I can obviously try a different browser to see if it works better on a site, but that still doesn't tell me why Opera 12.x doesn't work satisfactorily.)



  • @gdveggie:

    OK, so it sounds higher HTML5test.com scores are generally less about speed, per se, and more about how (and whether) content is displayed. (?)

    If so, then is the evolution toward HTML5 on more and more sites one of the main reasons Opera (11.x/12.x) successfully displays and functions satisfactorily on fewer and fewer sites? And if so, how can I verify that this is a reason for display/function problems on sites I visit using Opera 12.x? (I mean I can obviously try a different browser to see if it works better on a site, but that still doesn't tell me why Opera 12.x doesn't work satisfactorily.)

    Opera 12 and all previous versions were built on the Presto rendering engine which is now discontinued and unsupported. As web technologies like HTML and CSS evolve, so must web browsers in order to continue supporting websites that are coded with newer languages. Unfortunately, Opera 12 can't do that anymore, so it's stuck in a kind of cruel purgatory where it still has a significant amount of users, but it can't render what those users want to view properly anymore. As time goes on, it will only get worse until, perhaps eventually, Opera Presto will cease to render anything properly at all.

    Edit: So, yes. That's the reason why Opera Presto has problems rendering more and more sites. You could potentially use Opera's developer tools to check for the cause of errors when a website doesn't load correctly.



  • @Tiamarth:

    Edit: So, yes. That's the reason why Opera Presto has problems rendering more and more sites. You could potentially use Opera's developer tools to check for the cause of errors when a website doesn't load correctly.

    Thanks. I already knew about the de facto Presto EOL, but I just wasn't sure how much of the current evolution of website programming that goes "beyond" the static Presto and increasingly causes problems for Olde Opera can be properly subsumed under the rubric of "HTML5" (versus I-don't-know-what-other technologies).

    By Opera's developer tools I assume you mean Dragonfly and maybe the Error Console. (?) If so, I've used both a little bit but I'm not a programmer and don't know too much about what I would be looking for. Nevertheless, I'll have a look at those next time I run into something that I have time to check out.



  • @gdveggie:

    Thanks. I already knew about the de facto Presto EOL, but I just wasn't sure how much of the current evolution of website programming that goes "beyond" the static Presto and increasingly causes problems for Olde Opera can be properly subsumed under the rubric of "HTML5" (versus I-don't-know-what-other technologies).

    Well, HTML5 isn't strictly the cause for rendering errors in outdated browsers - it's just one of the most referenced in discussions on the topic. Without HTML, a website has no structure; without CSS, a website has no design (not necessarily true of website coded in Flash or JS).

    I loaded Youtube in Opera 12 just to get a screenshot of the error console, and all of the visible errors are caused by incompatibilities between the browser and CSS3.

    It turns out that console doesn't display errors with HTML5, so that may not work for your needs after-all.



  • @Tiamarth:

    It turns out that console doesn't display errors with HTML5, so that may not work for your needs after-all.

    Ah, OK, thanks! If at some point you discover something that might clue me in specifically on "HTML5" errors in Opera 12.x please post back or PM me.

    –-Thanks again! :)



  • Thanks for sharing your results guys. I guessed that the results will always depend on the actual environment (both hardware and softare) in which a browser test is run, and not exclusively on the browser itself. One of the most obvious criteria of such kind is 3D accelleration - it may not be available on your machine even if the browser supports it - and this test is worth whole 20 points.

    What I wanted to point out is that I got a score higher than any of the highest results recorded in the HTML5Test's highest scoring browsers list. That's something I haven't experienced first hand before, and I think it's magnificent to see a browser only a few months young beat or at least compete against the most successful ones out there.



  • @gdveggie:

    Ah, OK, thanks! If at some point you discover something that might clue me in specifically on "HTML5" errors in Opera 12.x please post back or PM me.

    –-Thanks again! :)

    No problem, happy to help.

    @tomica:

    What I wanted to point out is that I got a score higher than any of the highest results recorded in the HTML5Test's highest scoring browsers list. That's something I haven't experienced first hand before, and I think it's magnificent to see a browser only a few months young beat or at least compete against the most successful ones out there.

    Sorry, didn't mean to derail the topic. My original point for posting was that I scored the same in Vivaldi that I did in two other browsers, and one of them being one of the leading brands (I included all of that other information for potential interested parties). But I agree, it is impressive to see Vivaldi blow Firefox and IE out of the water for HTML5 support.



  • @tomica:

    What I wanted to point out is that I got a score higher than any of the highest results recorded in the HTML5Test's highest scoring browsers list.

    Yeah, I used to look at that list at times to compare but it tends to be hopelessly out of date, so it's usually best to ignore it and try out for yourself with a freshly updated browser. =)


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