Open letter to Jon concerning M3



  • (I translated the following open letter with deepl. com from German. DeepL is like Vivaldi: A small company named after its ingenious product. German is my mother tongue, so I have included the German version of this letter below.)

    (Ich habe den folgenden offenen Brief mit deepl.com aus dem Deutschen übersetzt. DeepL ist wie Vivaldi: Eine kleine Firma die so heißt wie ihr geniales Produkt. Deutsch ist meine Muttersprache, darum habe ich die deutsche Version dieses Briefes unten beigefügt.)


    Dear Jon,

    first of all, I want to commend you. Your work over the years has not only created two great web browsers. Rather, you have also made a decisive contribution to the emergence of the modern web. Your Presto engine has been driving the development of standards-compliant renderers for a long time, while others were still browser warriors using proprietary extensions on their battlefields. A shining beacon, lonely in the darkness of the proprietary web - to quote a legendary TV series.

    As we all know, the wheel of time has turned further. Presto is no longer the measure of all things, your former company is no longer what it once was. What remains is a web browser that is no longer being developed. I am referring to version 12.18, which has not been further developed for four years. Its namesake now carries the impressive version number 51, but its range of functions is modest compared to its old ancestor.

    Now there are a number of users, including myself, who use Opera 12.18 for various reasons. For some, it's the skins they've gotten used to over many years. I also use the design of Opera 8, but this is only a matter of taste and not a convincing argument. However, there are some features that make classical opera unique. The longer you work with your new company on your new browser, the shorter the list of these unique features gets.

    Many things have progressed so far that I would love to make your browser Vivaldi my default browser. Vivaldi is fast, very stable, has wonderful developer tools, a very sophisticated interface. The world could be so beautiful. Could. Wouldn't that be a killer feature I miss: A counterpart to Operas ingenious mail client M2.

    When you released your new browser almost exactly three years ago, you also announced the development of a new mail client. Since then I have been following the forum very closely on this subject. After all I've experienced since then, the development of a mail client is more difficult than you might have thought.

    I'm a software developer myself and I know that it's easy to build a program, but it's incredibly difficult to build a good program. And I know you're a lot like me. You never make predictions when something's ready. Sometimes you write highly complex routines on a single day, sometimes you get stuck for days or weeks on a ridiculously small problem. I understand you very well and would love to give you all the time you need to make M3 a good mail client.

    Unfortunately, time works against me. Because I can't really use Opera 12.18 productively anymore. As I wrote above, this browser has not been further developed for 4 years now. It's full of security flaws that have probably not caused any major damage just because Opera 12 has such a small market share that no developer of malware building kits bothered to write a plugin for it. But should this be the yardstick for continuing to use a completely outdated software in good conscience? I don't think so.

    However, it is even more important that Opera 12 becomes more and more incompatible with modern systems. So it's not really a solution if you write in the forum "Just use Opera M2 or Opera Mail until Vivaldi M3 is finished". In the meantime, I see Opera crashes on some systems every few minutes. For a while I thought it would be due to some newer javascript libraries like jQuery. But this is not logical, because the same Opera 12.18 runs on the same version of Windows on a different computer and practically never crashes. In the meantime I was able to limit the error to incompatibilities between Presto and the newer Intel graphics drivers.

    As a result, I can't use Opera 12.18 productively anymore, because I depend on modern, fast computers and can't stay on a 2nd-Gen Core i3 forever. I will be forced to switch to another mail client soon. However, a mail client is different from a sock or underwear that is best used fresh every day. For me and many other users, a mail client is more like a residential building. You build and design it only once and then use it for life. I would like to be able to research in my extensive mail databases what I wrote to whom many years ago. To do this I need a mail client that can search full-text very efficiently.

    Opera M2 was this mail client. It was not so much the fact that it was integrated into Opera as its basic structure, which met my needs like no other software. If I was forced to switch to Outlook, I would go to work frustrated every day. 100000 mails in your inbox? No chance with Outlook. Search 100000 mails for a keyword with Thunderbird? I'd have to spend half a day in front of the coffee machine.

    I just don't want to switch to software that is unsuitable for me, knowing that I will spend many years with it. I want to use a software that has been built by someone I know who thinks and works like me. And I know that you, dear Jon, know exactly what I want because we want the same thing.

    So let me ask you, Jon, what do you need to successfully complete the development of M3? For me and many others of my fellow sufferers, this includes the POP3 protocol. If there is no money, let's try a crowdfunding campaign.

    I very much hope that M3 will be a success. I hope you understand that I wouldn't push you so hard just because I would like to have a new mail client. If it were up to me, I'd stay with M2 forever. But this is simply no longer possible. Perhaps you can speak for yourself here. A lot of people here are waiting to hear something official about you. For I understand the poor moderators here, who can't say anything more than "When its ready" for the last three years and who turn their eyes when a new thread on the topic of M3 is created.

    Best regards from Germany to Iceland
    Cody

    (Now the original german version of this letter ...)


    Lieber Jon,

    zuerst einmal möchte ich dir ein großes Lob aussprechen. Deine Arbeit über all die Jahre hat nicht nur inzwischen zwei tolle Webbrowser geschaffen. Vielmehr hast du auch ganz entscheidend zur Entstehung des modernen Web beigetragen. Deine Presto-Engine trieb lange Zeit die Entwicklung standardkonformer Renderer voran, als andere noch Browserkrieger waren und proprietäre Erweiterungen auf ihren Schlachtfeldern nutzten. Ein strahlendes Leuchtfeuer, einsam in der Dunkelheit des proprietären Web - um mal eine legendäre Fernsehserie zu zitieren.

    Wie wir alle wissen, hat sich das Rad der Zeit weiter gedreht. Presto ist nicht mehr das Maß aller Dinge, deine ehemalige Firma ist auch nicht mehr das was sie einmal war. Geblieben ist ein Webbrowser, der nicht mehr weiter entwickelt wird. Ich meine natürlich die Version 12.18, welche seit vier Jahren nicht mehr weiter entwickelt wird. Sein Namensvetter trägt inzwischen die beeindruckende Versionsnummer 51. Doch sein Funktionsumfang wirkt bescheiden im Vergleich zu seinem greisen Urahn.

    Nun gibt es eine Reihe von Nutzern, zu denen ich mich auch zähle, welche aus verschiedenen Gründen Opera 12.18 nutzen. Für manche sind es die Skins, an die sie sich über viele viele Jahre gewöhnt hatten. Ich nutze zwar auch noch das Design von Opera 8, aber das ist nur Geschmackssache und kein schlagendes Argument. Jedoch gibt es einige Features, die den klassischen Opera einzigartig machen. Je länger du mit deiner neuen Firma an deinem neuen Browser arbeitest, umso kürzer wird die Liste dieser einzigartigen Features.

    Vieles ist inzwischen so weit gediehen, dass ich deinen Browser Vivaldi liebend gerne zu meinem Standardbrowser machen würde. Vivaldi ist schnell, sehr stabil, hat wunderbare Entwicklerwerkzeuge, eine sehr durchdachte Oberfläche. Die Welt könnte so schön sein. Könnte. Wäre da nicht ein Killerfeature, das mir fehlt: Ein Pendant zu Operas genialem Mailclient M2.

    Als du vor fast genau drei Jahren deinen neuen Browser veröffentlicht hast, kündigtest du auch die Entwicklung eines neuen Mailclients an. Seitdem verfolge ich das Forum sehr aufmerksam zu diesem Thema. Nach allem was ich seither erfahren habe, gestaltet sich die Entwicklung eines Mailclients schwieriger als ihr zuerst gedacht habt.

    Ich bin selbst Softwareentwickler und ich weiß dass es einfach ist ein Programm zu bauen, jedoch wahnsinnig schwierig, ein gutes Programm zu bauen. Und ich weiß, du bist mir sehr ähnlich. Du gibst niemals Prognosen ab, wann etwas fertig ist. Denn manchmal schreibt man hochkomplexe Routinen an einem einzigen Tag, manchmal bleibt man über Tage oder Wochen an einem lächerlich kleinen Problem hängen. Ich verstehe dich sehr gut und würde dir zu gerne all die Zeit geben die du brauchst um M3 zu einem guten Mailclient zu machen.

    Leider arbeitet die Zeit gegen mich. Denn ich kann Opera 12.18 nicht mehr wirklich produktiv verwenden. Wie ich oben schon schrieb, wurde dieser Browser seit nunmehr 4 Jahren nicht mehr weiterentwickelt. Er ist voller Sicherheitslücken, die wahrscheinlich nur deshalb noch keinen größeren Schaden angerichtet haben, weil Opera 12 einen so geringen Marktanteil hat, dass sich kein Entwickler von Malware Building Kits die Mühe macht, ein Plugin dafür zu schreiben. Doch sollte das der Maßstab sein um guten Gewissens eine völlig veraltete Software weiter zu verwenden? Ich denke nicht.

    Noch schwerer wiegt jedoch, dass Opera 12 mehr und mehr inkompatibel wird mit modernen Systemen. Deshalb ist es auch nicht wirklich eine Lösung, wenn im Forum geschrieben wird "Nutze doch einfach so lange Opera M2 oder Opera Mail bis Vivaldi M3 fertig ist". Ich beobachte auf einigen Systemen inzwischen Abstürze von Opera im Abstand von wenigen Minuten. Eine Zeit lang dachte ich, es läge an irgendwelchen neueren Javascript-Bibliotheken wie z.B. jQuery. Doch das ist nicht logisch, denn der selbe Opera 12.18 läuft auf der selben Windows-Version auf einem anderen Computer sehr stabil und stürzt praktisch nie ab. So konnte ich inzwischen den Fehler auf Inkompatibilitäten zwischen Presto und den neueren Intel Grafiktreibern eingrenzen.

    In der Konsequenz kann ich Opera 12.18 nicht mehr produktiv nutzen, denn ich bin auf moderne, schnelle Computer angewiesen und kann nicht ewig auf einem 2nd-Gen Core i3 bleiben. Ich werde gezwungen sein, bald auf einen anderen Mailclient zu wechseln. Doch ein Mailclient ist etwas anderes als eine Socke oder eine Unterhose, die man am besten täglich frisch gebraucht. Ein Mailclient ist für mich und viele andere Anwender mehr so etwas wie ein Wohnhaus. Man baut und gestaltet es nur ein einziges Mal und nutzt es dann ein Leben lang. Ich möchte in meinen umfangreichen Maildatenbeständen recherchieren können, was ich wem vor vielen Jahren schrieb. Dazu brauche ich einen Mailclient, der sehr effizient Volltexte durchsuchen kann.

    Opera M2 war dieser Mailclient. Es war weniger die Tatsache, dass er in Opera integriert war, sondern eben seine Grundkonstruktion, die meinen Bedürfnissen entsprach wie keine andere Software. Wäre ich gezwungen zu Outlook zu wechseln, ich würde jeden Tag frustriert zu Arbeit gehen. 100000 Mails im Posteingang? Keine Chance mit Outlook. 100000 Mails nach einem Stichwort durchsuchen mit Thunderbird? Ich müsste den halben Tag vor der Kaffeemaschine verbringen.

    Ich möchte ganz einfach nicht zu einer für mich unpassenden Software wechseln, wohl wissend dass ich damit viele Jahre verbringen werde. Ich möchte eine Software nutzen die jemand gebaut hat von dem ich weiß dass er so denkt und arbeitet wie ich selbst. Und ich weiß, dass du, lieber Jon, genau weißt was ich will, weil wir das selbe wollen.

    Darum lieber Jon, lass mich fragen: Was brauchst du damit du die Entwicklung von M3 erfolgreich abschließen kannst? Dazu zählt für mich und viele andere meiner Leidensgenossen vorallem auch das POP3-Protokoll. Fehlt es am Geld, dann lass es uns doch mal mit einer Crowdfunding Kampagne versuchen.

    Ich wünsche mir sehr, dass M3 ein Erfolg wird. Ich hoffe du verstehst, dass ich dich nicht so sehr drängen würde, nur weil ich gerne einen neuen Mailclient hätte. Ginge es nach mir, ich würde bis in alle Ewigkeit bei M2 bleiben. Doch das ist einfach nicht mehr möglich. Vielleicht kannst du dich ja selbst einmal hier zu Wort melden. Viele Leute hier warten sehr darauf, einmal etwas offizielles zu dem Thema von dir zu hören. Denn ich habe Verständnis für die armen Moderatoren hier, die seit drei Jahren nichts weiter sagen können als "When its ready" und schon die Augen verdrehen, wenn wieder einmal ein neuer Thread zum Thema M3 erstellt wird.

    Beste Grüße aus Deutschland nach Island
    Cody


  • Moderator

    @codehunter Thanks for taking the trouble to write such a well balanced letter. I am one of those still launching Opera 12.18 every day, just to manage my emails.

    See Jon's reply to my question at 23:45 on the PodCast.

    You might also like my Blog article: A Discussion on Patience.



  • @pesala Oh, that's really new on the blog. What a coincidence! I didn't even get to look in there today. I will probably not be able to listen to this until the weekend, for lack of time and because I have my headphones at home. Can you briefly summarize if and if so, what Jon said about M3? Thank you very much!

    Oh das ist wirklich neu im Blog. Was für ein Zufall! Ich bin heute noch gar nicht dazu gekommen heute da rein zu schauen. Ich werde mir das wahrscheinlich erst am Wochenende anhören können, aus Zeitgründen und weil ich meine Kopfhörer zu Hause liegen habe. Kannst du kurz zusammenfassen, ob und wenn ja, was Jon zum Thema M3 gesagt hat? Vielen Dank!


  • Moderator

    @codehunter said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    Can you briefly summarize if and if so, what Jon said about M3? Thank you very much!

    The only answer he can give, of course, is “When it's ready.” Although the IMAPI client is largely finished and in use by Sopranos, POP3 and email Import are not nearly ready yet. He does not want to release the mail client and have users lose their mail.

    Although you and I know very well about the hazards of using Beta software or Snapshots, inevitably. many users just do not get it. They complain bitterly about Chromium bugs over which Vivaldi has no control. It is just not worth ruining Vivaldi's reputation by releasing it too soon. It is not Vapour-ware, it really is coming soon.



  • Very well written, thanks for your letter!

    I agree that a mail client like M2 (or even better) is missing and I see how many people are eagerly awaiting its arrival.

    Maybe you can enlighten me on a topic which I just seem unable to comprehend up to now: why do many apparently need M3 as a Vivaldi integrated feature? Why not release M3 as a separate client which can be used independently of or completely without Vivaldi?

    More generic: what benefit do you see for yourself if many features are packed into one application? Are there integration benefits to combining mail and www? Or is it just easier not to switch apps?



  • @pesala said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    @codehunter said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    Can you briefly summarize if and if so, what Jon said about M3? Thank you very much!

    The only answer he can give, of course, is “When it's ready.” Although the IMAPI client is largely finished and in use by Sopranos, POP3 and email Import are not nearly ready yet. He does not want to release the mail client and have users lose their mail.

    Although you and I know very well about the hazards of using Beta software or Snapshots, inevitably. many users just do not get it. They complain bitterly about Chromium bugs over which Vivaldi has no control. It is just not worth ruining Vivaldi's reputation by releasing it too soon. It is not Vapour-ware, it really is coming soon.

    I already wrote in my letter that I understand the reasons why Jon and his team are so cautious about releasing such a complex feature. That's not really my primary concern. Because I write software myself, I know that the development time to release a first public alpha or beta is always the sum of man-hours invested in development.

    If you develop professional software, you never write everything yourself, because that would take too long. Just like we decided to use Chromium as a renderer instead of rewriting a new engine like Presto from scratch. Chromium is free of charge if you comply with certain licensing conditions. But I can well imagine that the mail client in particular could benefit from other professional source codes. For example, finished IMAP and POP3 implementations or a powerful database engine. These are, indirectly, buyable man hours. If something like this could help, but it simply lacks the necessary small change, I made the proposal with the crowdfunding campaign.

    The POP3 issue is very difficult. There are still a lot of free mailproviders who simply don't offer IMAP. Secondly, and this seems to be a peculiarity of the German mentality, many users mistrust the mail providers. They simply do not want to store their mail stock externally on a kind of cloud server. On the one hand, because there are doubts about reliability and availability, and on the other hand, because in Germany there is a deep and elementary mistrust of the state and, above all, its secret services. This has historical reasons and has grown for more than 70 years. As a developer, you should always take this seriously.

    By the way, I've never been a soprano, because my understanding of beta testers tells me that you not only get the latest beta software, but also give detailed feedback. Unfortunately, I often don't have time for that in my job. Nevertheless, I would like to take a look at how far M3 has progressed in the meantime. Of course, I wouldn't use it for my production mailbox, of course, but for a separate test account.


    Ich habe ja in meinem Brief schon geschrieben, dass ich die Gründe sehr gut verstehe, weshalb Jon und sein Team so vorsichtig sind mit der Freigabe eines so komplexen Features. Darum geht es mir eigentlich nicht vorrangig. Weil ich selbst Software schreibe weiß ich, dass die Entwicklungszeit bis zur Freigabe einer ersten öffentlichen Alpha oder Beta immer die Summe der Mannstunden ist, die man in die Entwicklung investiert.

    Wenn man professionelle Software entwickelt, dann schreibt man ja nie alles selbst, weil das viel zu lange dauern würde. So wie man sich hier entschieden hat, z.B. Chromium als Renderer einzusetzen, statt eine neue Engine wie Presto von Grund auf neu zu schreiben. Chromium ist kostenlos wenn man sich an gewisse Lizenzbestimmungen hält. Doch ich kann mir gut vorstellen, dass gerade der Mailclient sehr von anderen professionellen Quellcodes profitieren könnte. Beispielsweise von fertigen IMAP- und POP3-Implementierungen oder auch eine leistungsfähige Datenbankengine. Das sind, indirekt, zukaufbare Mannstunden. Falls so etwas helfen könnte aber schlicht das nötige Kleingeld dafür fehlt, dafür habe ich den Vorschlag mit der Crowdfunding-Kampagne gemacht.

    Das Thema POP3 ist ganz schwierig. Es gibt nach wie vor viele freie Mailprovider, die schlicht kein IMAP anbieten. Zweitens, und das scheint eine Besonderheit der deutschen Mentalität zu sein, misstrauen viele Anwender den Mailprovidern. Sie wollen ihre Mailbestände ganz einfach nicht extern auf einer Art Cloudserver lagern. Zum Einen weil man an der Zuverlässigkeit und Verfügbarkeit zweifelt, zum anderen weil man in Deutschland ein ganz tiefes und elementares Misstrauen gegenüber dem Staat und vorallem seinen Geheimdiensten hat. Das hat historische Gründe und ist über mehr als 70 Jahre gewachsen. Das sollte man als Entwickler immer ernst nehmen.

    Am Rande bemerkt, ich war nie ein Soprano weil mein Verständnis von Betatestern mir sagt, dass man nicht nur die neueste Beta Software bekommt, sondern auch ausführliche Rückmeldungen gibt. Dafür fehlt mir, leider, in meinem Job oftmals die Zeit. Trotzdem würde ich mir sehr gerne mal anschauen, wie weit M3 inzwischen gediehen ist. Allerdings würde ich es natürlich nicht auf mein produktiv genutztes Postfach ansetzen sondern auf ein separat zu Testzwecken eingerichtetes.



  • @morg42 said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    Very well written, thanks for your letter!
    I agree that a mail client like M2 (or even better) is missing and I see how many people are eagerly awaiting its arrival.
    Maybe you can enlighten me on a topic which I just seem unable to comprehend up to now: why do many apparently need M3 as a Vivaldi integrated feature? Why not release M3 as a separate client which can be used independently of or completely without Vivaldi?
    More generic: what benefit do you see for yourself if many features are packed into one application? Are there integration benefits to combining mail and www? Or is it just easier not to switch apps?

    This is a topic that is very often asked in connection with Opera and M2. After all, Opera simply removed the M2 mail client from the Opera browser and released it as a separate program. To put it simply, the difference is nothing more than the mouse path you have to move back and forth to switch between the two parts of the program. Whether the switch is located in a browser toolbar or the taskbar of the operating system, this is actually just a question of the user's habit.

    As a developer, I can also say that it doesn't make a lot of difference from a technical point of view whether you pack both parts into one application or into two separate ones. There are even techniques that allow you to connect separate programs with each other in such a way that they look like one - similar to plugins in Firefox or Chrome. Only the plugins do not work without the browser.


    Das ist ein Thema, dass sehr oft im Zusammenhang mit Opera und M2 gefragt wird. Schließlich hat die Firma Opera den Mailclient M2 einfach aus dem Browser Opera ausgebaut und als separates Programm veröffentlicht. Der Unterschied ist, vereinfacht gesagt, nichts weiter als der Mauspfad, den man zurück legen muss um zwischen den beiden Programmteilen umzuschalten. Ob der Umschalter nun in einer Toolbar des Browsers liegt oder der Taskbar des Betriebssystems, das ist eigentlich nur eine Frage der Gewohnheit des Anwenders.

    Als Entwickler kann ich auch sagen, es macht technisch gesehen nicht viel Unterschied, ob man beide Teile nun in eine Anwendung packt oder in zwei getrennte. Es gibt sogar Techniken, mittels derer man separate Programme so mit einander verbinden kann dass sie wie eines aussehen - vergleichbar mit Plugins in Firefox oder Chrome. Nur dass hier die Plugins nicht ohne den Browser funktionieren.



  • @morg42 said :

    More generic: what benefit do you see for yourself if many features are packed into one application? Are there integration benefits to combining mail and www? Or is it just easier not to switch apps?

    I think, that many people used the mail panel in O12 times, so you had always a quick overview.
    But if I remember correctly, someone has explained it like this (maybe Jon himself?):
    you need a renderer to display the html mails correctly. And if you have a mailprogram with a render engine, then it's easy to use the render engine also for browsing websites, so you also reduce the hardware resources.


  • Vivaldi Team

    @codehunter Thanks for this detailed message and for your support to Opera and now Vivaldi.

    I can tell you that we are very eager to get M3 out. I have been using it myself, as a replacement for M2, for more than a year now. During that time it has improved a lot. I would not dream of going back to M2. That being said, there are still things to do. Although a lot of the heavy lifting is done, there are still issues to resolve with regards to stability and memory usage in particular and there are still unfinished features and even missing features. Sadly that includes POP3 at this time, but I do hope we will get to it soon.

    We have used some third party libraries this time as well, but there is still a lot of work to get this right. We have enough resources on this task, although one could always use a bit more. That being said, we do not need external funding. If you want to support us, please share Vivaldi with your friends. That is the best way to support us, as the more users we get, the better.

    I would hope we have some really good news in the months ahead. M3 is looking great and looking better each day. Just give us a little more time and I believe it will have been worth the wait. :)

    Best,
    Jon.



  • @codehunter said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    To put it simply, the difference is nothing more than the mouse path you have to move back and forth to switch between the two parts of the program. Whether the switch is located in a browser toolbar or the taskbar of the operating system, this is actually just a question of the user's habit.

    This is what I thought.

    As a developer, I can also say that it doesn't make a lot of difference from a technical point of view whether you pack both parts into one application or into two separate ones. There are even techniques that allow you to connect separate programs with each other in such a way that they look like one - similar to plugins in Firefox or Chrome. Only the plugins do not work without the browser.

    I see clear advantages to developing separate apps: you can have independent release cycles, maybe even different dev teams, and although often overlooked, smaller downloads for the individual programs.

    @derday said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    I think, that many people used the mail panel in O12 times, so you had always a quick overview.

    I have a system-wide mail panel, others may not. Ok...

    you need a renderer to display the html mails correctly. And if you have a mailprogram with a render engine, then it's easy to use the render engine also for browsing websites, so you also reduce the hardware resources.

    That is a valid point I had not thought of before. My mail program is console only, so for me HTML mails are a nuisance anyway. The backup (Airmail, also on mobile, see above) does display. It might be worth using the V renderer - but then I'd like to have some control over what elements might be loaded / activated (external resources, scripts, ...)

    Thanks for your feedback!



  • I would be happy with IMAP only!



  • I would be unhappy with IMAP only! In fact, i would not use any email schema that precluded POP3.


  • Moderator

    @steffie Well, to be fair, however it is released initially, it will have POP3 ultimately.



  • @ayespy I know [i listened to the podcast yesterday & was gratified with Jon's assurance]. My post here was merely aimed as a 100% counterpoint to any instance where i read other users opine that IMAP-only would be ok... it would not. My logic is that if POP3 supporters stay quiet & only IMAPers post [implausible i know, but i'm all about principle] then over time a false perception would arise that the V community only cared about IMAP.

    You know, it's my version of the classic aphorism "When good women do nothing, IMAP arises" or the alternative "All that is necessary for the triumph of IMAP is that good women do nothing" ;-)


  • Moderator

    @steffie Well, one of our strongest and most prolific Sopranos and moderators lives in Germany, and their local email provider has only POP3, no IMAP. If there's no POP3, I fear there will be an internal rebellion. :)


  • Moderator

    @steffie And I personally must have POP3 for permanent business records. For the time being, I turn on a POP3 client periodically just to download and permanently store all email incrementally. I run a MAPI client routinely, so as to synchronize emails on my various and diverse devices in multiple locations (because, for instance, I have 2 offices 630 miles from each other...)



  • @ayespy said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    I have 2 offices 630 miles from each other

    Makes one wistful for schizophrenia, eh?



  • @ayespy said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    ... And I personally must have POP3 for permanent business records. ...

    This!!



  • @ayespy said in Open letter to Jon concerning M3:

    must have POP3 for permanent business records

    See? That's it, that's what i simply do not get about IMAPers. IMO it's simply madness to presume that one's critical personal &/or business records are safe when kept on someone else's remote servers rather than in the individual user's own local system. One does not need to be a tinhatter to feel this way; there are various cases when 3rd party email providers either simply shut up shop without notice, were hacked, or were OoS for extended periods for tech reasons. To place one's faith in the permanent availability of others' facilities, & risk one's own data on that flawed premise, is loopy IMO.



  • @ayespy Which email provider?


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Vivaldi Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.