Windows 7 not supported? (only Metro-style GUI)



  • I have just installed Vivaldi and with great disappointment I realized that it does not support Windows 7. Will Windows 7 be supported in the future? I couldn't find the system requirements anywhere on the website.



  • What exactly do you mean by "does not support Windows 7"? Any special feature you'd expect is not supported? Since otherwise it installs and runs just fine, as you would expect when it comes to the most commonly installed version of Windows today.



  • Installed flawlessly and is working fine for me on my Windows 7 Enterprise x64 machine and my Windows 8.1 Professional x64 machine at home. Keeping in mind it is still a tech preview/snapshot version too.



  • I mean that when I run Vivaldi on my system (Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1), an ugly, white frameless Metro-style GUI appears, with no option to disable it. If Windows 7 were supported, then it would be pointless forcing this —pardon the expression— crap, instead of using native Windows controls and frames. Thus I wonder if they plan to support Windows 7 in final version. I couldn't find any information regarding system requirements on the website, except for the logo on download page, which is in fact Windows 8 logo.



  • Ah, so by "it's not supported" you actually mean "it does not look how I expect it to look". OK.

    In that case I guess you could say that it's "not supported". Note, though, that if you go with this meaning of "not supported", then it's not supported on any version of Windows, since it doesn't conform to any system-wide visual style under any version of Windows, it simply uses its own distinct style (like many other apps).



  • I have win7 32 bits starter ed. and I could use vivaldi very well.



  • Vivaldi renders the GUI as a 'web page', i.e. (almost) no information from the underlying operating system is used.
    As far as I can see it it basically just distinguishes between linux/windows/OSX and applies the respective styles.

    But due to the customizability of these styles it is not very difficult to create additional styles for different OS versions.
    Even if the Vivaldi team does not provide an extra skin for Win 7 it would be possible for the community to create some on their own.
    (unless they would start artificially restricting this feature, which would make no sense imho)

    As for aero glass support: I think this would be very unlikely due to the underlying technology.



  • @Case:

    Ah, so by "it's not supported" you actually mean "it does not look how I expect it to look". OK.

    In that case I guess you could say that it's "not supported". Note, though, that if you go with this meaning of "not supported", then it's not supported on any version of Windows, since it doesn't conform to any system-wide visual style under any version of Windows, it simply uses its own distinct style (like many other apps).

    Yes, that's what I mean. So I'm asking if they plan to support Windows 7. This is called backward compatibility.

    I can't agree that Vivalid's look doesn't conform to any system-wide visual style. It clearly resembles the Metro UI known from Windows 8/10, which makes it suitable for Windows 8/10 desktop, but a pain to use in Windows 7 desktop (especially with "classic" theme). Imagine an app that would force Win'95 look in Windows 8/10 - I'm sure you would hate it.

    @AlexRuppert:

    Vivaldi renders the GUI as a 'web page', i.e. (almost) no information from the underlying operating system is used.
    As far as I can see it it basically just distinguishes between linux/windows/OSX and applies the respective styles.

    But due to the customizability of these styles it is not very difficult to create additional styles for different OS versions.
    Even if the Vivaldi team does not provide an extra skin for Win 7 it would be possible for the community to create some on their own.
    (unless they would start artificially restricting this feature, which would make no sense imho)

    As for aero glass support: I think this would be very unlikely due to the underlying technology.

    Well, if that's the case, I guess an extra "skin" that would resemble "basic" theme of Windows 7 would be fine. It would be even better, if they added an option to enable native window frame (it's just the matter of flag combination in WinAPI function call). That would bring Aero glass support, although only for the main window frame.



  • I run a Windows 7 system, and I really do like the Aero look or visual effect. That said, I run a wide variety of software applications on the system besides a browser, and few of them provide much of an Aero "look", either native or as an option. In the grand scheme of things browser-related, for me, whether or not a browser conforms to the Aero "bling" pales to insignificance compared with its configurability, speed, and browsing capabilities.

    Beyond that, it's extremely early in the game for Vivaldi. I firmly believe the best is yet to come over the coming weeks and months.



  • @forsajt:

    Yes, that's what I mean. So I'm asking if they plan to support Windows 7. This is called backward compatibility.

    I can't agree that Vivalid's look doesn't conform to any system-wide visual style. It clearly resembles the Metro UI known from Windows 8/10, which makes it suitable for Windows 8/10 desktop, but a pain to use in Windows 7 desktop (especially with "classic" theme). Imagine an app that would force Win'95 look in Windows 8/10 - I'm sure you would hate it.

    Sorry, but no. That's not what "backward compatibility" means. It means that an app is fully capable of running on older systems. Which Vivaldi has absolutely no problem with (even if you consider Win 7 to be an older system, which I personally wouldn't). It doesn't really matter how that app looks from the compatibility point of view, as long as it runs properly and all (or as much as possible) of its features can be used. Again, Vivaldi has no compatibility problem with Win 7 here.

    Also, no, it doesn't conform to any system-wide visual style. Not even on Windows 8, 8.1 or 10. The key word here is "resembles". Yes, you might indeed say that Vivaldi UI and its window, as it is right now, does RESEMBLE a Metro-style app, but even on Windows 8.x/10 it looks different than other apps and its window style does not conform to how most of the other apps look, be it modern or legacy apps. As I've said, it simply uses its own style altogether, ignoring the system settings (at least for now). It looks the same way on any Windows system you can run it to, it pretty much looks the same in Linux and I expect it also looks pretty much the same on OS X. Why that is was explained in detail by AlexRuppert.

    And, as I've noted, it's far from the only app that ignores the system-wide appearance settings and uses its own. See for example any Adobe product. Or Steam client. Or plenty of other apps.

    BTW, my main Windows system is Win 7, even though I also have other systems available. And while I'm not overly fond of Vivaldi UI for a multitude of reasons and I'm hoping that there will be some changes coming, I think saying that it's "a pain to use" because it uses its own style is a bit exaggerated, let alone saying that it's "not supported", which does mean something else entirely.



  • OK, I admit I was wrong. When I started this thread, I wasn't aware that they moved entire GUI to CSS. I thought it was something different. Nevertheless, given this is all about the skin, I hope we will get an improved one, designed to be more friendly for legacy desktop.



  • The current GUI looks dreary and incompatible with every OS. The move to CSS seems like an arrogance of the designer who wants to impose a Vivaldi house style to replace our chosen OS desktop style. This is not good enough.



  • Thank you Vivaldi developers.
    The spirit of Presto-based Opera (speed, configurability, etc) with a modern engine.
    CSS seems like a good idea, I'm sure either:
    1. someone can come up with a win7 CSS file to replace the default.
    2. a future build will support a default/site/user CSS tree for endless tweaking :)
    Good luck with future developments!



  • @Terryphi:

    The current GUI looks dreary and incompatible with every OS. The move to CSS seems like an arrogance of the designer who wants to impose a Vivaldi house style to replace our chosen OS desktop style. This is not good enough.

    I think 'imposing' their style is far from their goal (they are not Microsoft ;) ). If you want to impose something, you don't need to use CSS, etc.

    There are some benefits of using web technology:

    1. Easily customizable, skins can be created easily, lots of possibilities
    2. Less effort to maintain (i.e. it looks and behaves the same everywhere)
    3. Faster development (especially helpful for a small team)

    Of course adaption to the existing environment is a problem. But this again can be solved/alleviate by skins and/or attribute injections (i.e. read out the color scheme of the OS and inject it)



  • Frankly Vivaldi theme is very close to what I'm used to on Opera 1x, so I'm very happy with it.

    If you want more coherence with the win 7 UI just actualize the win 7 theme (you will retain the transparency, like in win 8 build 8400)

    http://mare-m.deviantart.com/art/Windows-8-8-1-Theme-for-Windows-7-318932206



  • P.S.

    And BTW, transparency in the browsers, especially when they aren't windowed, is not so a good Idea.

    Try (on win 7 or win 8/10 with the transparency enabled) to launch Opera 12 with dozens of tabs opened and then launch Opium on top of it with just 2/3 tabs.

    You will get a visual mess, because the tabs on background browser will be visible from the one in foreground….



  • Personally I think this browser is pretty damn sexy and I looooove the fact that it isn't "the same" as everything else in Windows. It's got style. If you're not a person that likes the "flat UI" type of style, fair enough, generally I don't like it all over the place either but it certainly can look nice in independent components, such as a browser.

    I don't have a whole lot else to say other than to repeat what everyone else has already said about the simple fact of the browser not looking like the standard UI of everything else in Windows meaning that it doesn't support Windows 7.

    Have you looked at recent versions of Microsoft Office? They have the flat UI as well, yet are fully "supported" in Windows 7 even though they don't look like Windows 7.

    Anyway, I think the browser looks quite gorgeous, stylish and modern. I like where Vivaldi is going. I used to be a lover of Opera as well but in recent times it because faaaar too Chrome like - so much so that it just seemed like an Opera themed version of Chrome.

    Keep it up Vivaldi Tech. Keep it up.



  • I was hoping that Vivaldi is not force us to use their flat style whatever it names.

    It would be good if Vivaldi follow the GUI that set by user in their own Windows.So its going to looked like the rest of the other apps.

    However If you want flat UI style you can use 3rd visual style.

    BTW i am using Win8 with aero enabled.



  • BTW The UI coherence inside a single operating system, means by definition that a SW becomes incoherent with itself, when switching OS.

    Once windows was the king of the OSes aimed to the end users, and the browser was just an "utility".

    Nowadays the outlook is different.

    Macos gained market share, Linux too.

    There are a lot of Mobile operating systems, and more important some kind of programs gained a greater importance.

    The browsers are one of them.

    Practically nowadays the browser IS the operating system, many poeople uses an IT device just to use it.

    Multimedia SW dedicated to the HTPCs is another type of this class of programs.

    Now while could be nice to have a SW who respect the undeliyng GUI, could be nicer to have a SW that one uses 99% of the time coherent with itself.

    Think to XBMC/Kodi. It looks exactly the same On macos, linux, windows whatever and its look has nothing to do with the underlying GUI.

    I consider this a pro more than a con, and the same goes for the browser.

    That said when the tabs where introduced they break some UI guidelines, and looked awkward to anyone was used to more standard looking programs. And was a good thing.

    Even MS itself doesn't respect always it's own guidelines, think to media player, think to te ribbons when where firstly introduced, think to the Windows Media Center.

    Sometimes the rules needs to be broken/rewritten.

    vivaldi will gain surely some skinning capabilities and more and more customization options but for now I hope thei focus their efforts on more important things (mail client, sync capabilities, and small little features not yet implemented like the paste and go)



  • I really like the current design of Vivaldi as it is, but looking at the forums and what community has already done with the skin I'm sure it's not impossible for Default Aero skin to come.


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Vivaldi Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.