I386 linux version



  • I tried to download the ubuntu version, but there's only an amd64 version for debian based systems (there's an x86 & amd64 version for for RedHat). Since I don't want to install an rpm packet manager, where can I get a x86 .deb version?



  • +1



  • at least we know we will have soon a 32 version, opera tell us we should stick with opera 12…



  • Me too please! :cheer:

    Would prefer a tarball as I am using an arch based distro, but I guess it would show up in the AUR when it is ready pretty soon…



  • Install just the rpm command, then use midnight commander to copy the files in the right position.

    It's matter of 30 seconds.



  • +1



  • @zikkeratak:

    at least we know we will have soon a 32 version, opera tell us we should stick with opera 12…

    thats great news! where did you read this so i can get more info?



  • I like Vivaldi for 32 bit :) I hope this will be



  • @The_Solutor:

    Install just the rpm command, then use midnight commander to copy the files in the right position.

    It's matter of 30 seconds.

    It's your choice, of course, but that's a really bad practice you're advising here. The package manager is there for a reason.



  • @Case:

    It's your choice, of course, but that's a really bad practice you're advising here.

    No it's not bad

    No it's not a a "pratice", it's just a solution likely aimed to be used once.

    and no, I'm not "advising" I'm ust explaining a method easy to manage (and understand) even for a newbie.

    And no, package managers exist for a number of reasons, not just one, but the extremization of the concept are the iphone and its users, usually unable to to take any action different than pushing a button.

    I hope the userbase here is a little more skilled ;)



  • Okay. I do believe it's a really bad "solution" that should generally be avoided at all times and should not be used even once, especially not by a newbie (if one happens to read it), but I have no intention of dragging this any further.

    I just felt like it should be noted for the sake of anyone who would try to follow such advice (or explanation or statement or whatever you wish to call it) that it's not a very good idea/practice/whatever to just go writing/overwriting files that should be managed by the package manager in the first place, unless you know perfectly well what you're doing (and perhaps even then it is still a bad idea/practice/whatever).



  • @Case:

    Okay. I do believe it's a really bad "solution" that should generally be avoided at all times and should not be used even once, especially not by a newbie (if one happens to read it), but I have no intention of dragging this any further.

    We aren't talking about the highest politics or religion, I believe.

    It's just a linux installation, and just browser not a kernel or the init system.

    There are just a couple of folders and a coule of files to unpack in the right place.

    Using mc one is looking what is doing, and the actions (coping some files/folder) could be easily reverted (deleting some folders).

    People started using linux with no package manager at all and some are still living practically w/o them, they are all surviving happily ;)

    writing/overwriting files that should be managed by the package manager in the first place

    obviously that's the preferred way.

    The point is that this preferred way isn't available here.

    And we aren't even talking of an upgrade, no files candidates to be overwritten, no startup scripts to take in account, no conflicting libraries or other fancy unix things.

    The worst thing that can happen is that, the next time, when the sw will be available in the proper package form, the package manager will ask to manually remove the files not managed by the pm itself, but present on the filesystem.

    unless you know perfectly well what you're doing

    No one knows perfectly what he is doing, the first time is doing something.

    Sometime learning has a price, forums are helping on this, but is hard (if not impossible), to learn to ride a bike w/o some little hurt. Computers aren't different.

    The good news is that mistakes happen once or twice, while learning something is forever. A good deal I believe ;)


  • Moderator

    +1

    Yes, on some devices like my netbooks i can only install 32bit Linux.

    So i need a 32bit Vivaldi, too!



  • me too ! else i must reinstall Xubuntu with 64 bit :lol:



  • I also hope a x86 .deb version…


  • Moderator

    @Gwen-Dragon:

    So i need a 32bit Vivaldi, too!

    +1



  • Vivat Vivaldi ;) Presne o takomto prehliadači sme snívali,ked nás Opera prestala počúvať….Aj ja by som privítal 32bitovú verziu. Používam ešte 10.O4 Lucid Lynx.



  • Install just the rpm command, then use midnight commander to copy the files in the right position.

    It's matter of 30 seconds.

    Doesn't that require updating a Debian-32 installation to use a 64 bit kernel via the multiarch feature? Well, on Debian it would be the deb files and the ar command.

    IMO - that's kinda dangerous for a regular user.



  • @Ronaldlees:

    Install just the rpm command, then use midnight commander to copy the files in the right position.

    It's matter of 30 seconds.

    Doesn't that require updating a Debian-32 installation to use a 64 bit kernel via the multiarch feature? Well, on Debian it would be the deb files and the ar command.

    No.

    I'm talking about installing the rpm packaged 32 bit version, not the deb x64.

    IMO - that's kinda dangerous for a regular user.

    The "danger" is to learn something about the fs structure, the way a sw is packaged, the features of mc.

    Nowadays ignorance is marketed by apple ( & C) as a value, accepting this, yes is a real danger :)



  • @The_Solutor:

    @Ronaldlees:

    Install just the rpm command, then use midnight commander to copy the files in the right position.

    It's matter of 30 seconds.

    –--Doesn't that require updating a Debian-32 installation to use a 64 bit kernel via the multiarch feature? Well, on Debian it would be the deb files and the ar command.

    No.

    I'm talking about installing the rpm packaged 32 bit version, not the deb x64.

    –-----------------------------

    –-IMO - that's kinda dangerous for a regular user.

    The "danger" is to learn something about the fs structure, the way a sw is packaged, the features of mc.

    Nowadays ignorance is marketed by apple ( & C) as a value, accepting this, yes is a real danger :)

    I'm all for being un-ignoranized. I don't know much about midnight commander, for starters. OK, so on my Debian system I do a file <vivaldi-bin>as follows:

    file vivaldi-bin
    vivaldi-bin: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.26, BuildID[sha1]=0xb3f1f20278f7f339d46564a011b0dd9b288b06a9, stripped
    
    

    You're not saying that you can run that on Linux, without updating the kernel to a 64 bit kernel, (using multi-arch). Right? You're just saying that the upgrade is not a big deal.

    Edit: OK, I am ignorant maybe. There's a 32 bit official RPM?</vivaldi-bin>


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