Chritsmas Dinner



  • Norwegians always speak about what they are going to eat on Christmas Eve. It's the most asked question in December. Obviously everyone in Norway is either eating Pinnekjøtt url=http://godtdrikke.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/pinnekjott.jpg[/url] or Ribbe ( url=http://daisy.sodor.no/generated/5693_ribbe.jpg[/url] Some also eat fish, but thats fewer and fewer. So what do you guys eat? I guess Americans have xmas dinner 1 christmas day, but that also count in here ;-) I'm myself waiting to have Ribbe today, not my favorite as I'm used to eat Bird (duck or goose)


  • Vivaldi Team

    I am eating the only right choice; steamed salted lamb. (pinnekjøtt) looking forward to it, just as few more hours now :-D


  • Vivaldi Team

    Since I'm a Norwegian living in the US with small kids the whole Christmas thing gets complicated. We have one Tex-Mex meal (living in Texas) with tamales and gløgg on Christmas Eve and the Norwegian Santa comes knocking on the door with presents for all. The we have the American Christmas dinner on Christmas Day after the American Santa has been leaving more presents overnight and filled the stockings. For the main Christmas dinner we have duck.


  • Vivaldi Team

    Pinnekjøtt is my favorite traditional Christmas food. Send me some please! :)



  • @olli:

    … Pinnekjøtt (lamb) or Ribbe (Rib) ...

    Are you sure? In your current avatar photo, it looks like a couple of you are sizing up some nice leopard ribs… ;)



  • Usually it's turkey but I pleaded with my wife to reconsider and she did. This year the kids are in Kauai so it's just the two of us and we're having prime rib. :)



  • Now I'm hungry.



  • We have typical Swedish food - Julskinka with mustard, Janssons frestelse, several salads with herring and beetroot, lutfisk, different kinds of sausages, meatballs and etc.
    And drinking Swedish julmust :)


  • Vivaldi Team

    Just clarification: in Russia the Christmas is on January, 7th, after the New Year :)
    The reason is a bit interesting. Although the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic officially adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1918, the Russian Orthodox Church continued to use the Julian calendar. Thus, we celebrate New Year, then Christmas, and then - Old New Year :)
    Of course, not all of Russians: for many atheists (like me) the Christmas is just religious holiday, important for some religious people, not for all us. I guess, religious people have some special dishes for Christmas, but I don't know any of these. In fact, we use the standard holidays set of Russian dishes like salads, meat, chicken, fish, etc.

    Actually, the christianization of Ancient Rus' took place more than 1000 years ago, but the older "pagan" holidays still popular, for example, like Maslenitsa (other title - "the saw off of winter"). These holidays are even more popular because all people celebrate it regardless of religious or political convictions. And for Maslenitsa there is a traditional food - pancakes.



  • @Shpankov:

    Just clarification: in Russia the Christmas is on January, 7th, after the New Year :)
    The reason is a bit interesting. Although the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic officially adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1918, the Russian Orthodox Church continued to use the Julian calendar. Thus, we celebrate New Year, then Christmas, and then - Old New Year :)

    Yes, this is interesting. My wife and I are Orthodox, members of the Orthodox Church in America which historically is connected to the Russian Orthodox Church. A few decades back a number of Orthodox churches worldwide decided to adopt the Gregorian Calendar for all of the year EXCEPT for Great Lent in which we fall back to the Julian Calendar. Thus our calendar is sort of a hybrid: part Julian and part Gregorian. My wife and I celebrated Christmas on December 25th and will celebrate Theophany (Epiphany as it is called here) on January 7th in which the waters will be blessed and our homes will be blessed by the priest with holy water. :)



  • @Shpankov:

    Just clarification: in Russia the Christmas is on January, 7th, after the New Year :)

    Hey Shpankov - look what I´ve found at MyOpera B) :

    hWkMh4F-5eQ
    5 января. С.Петербург. Дворцовая площадь
    (January 5th. St.Petersburg. Palace Square - 5. Januar. St.Petersburg. Schlossplatz)

    I do not understand a word! But the atmosphere is great and the music is so authentic and beautiful melancholic, like a lot of Russian folk music. I love that!


  • Vivaldi Team

    It's not a real folk music - it's the acoustic variant of Russian rock music of 1980s. The DDT rock-group. Listen the original:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6bPvsFUKms

    Another cool song from this rock-group:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGcfZ7BOfkY

    The last song from your video is quite interesting. It's the soundtrack from the Soviet cartoon (with a lot of songs). The original (1969):

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jbsuLAeFwRU

    And the full list of songs.

    Very popular in Russia. Almost all voice parts were performed by by Oleg Anofriev - the unique composer and singer (1960s, today). The story based on fairy tale "Town Musicians of Bremen" (German: Die Bremer Stadtmusikanten) is a folktale recorded by the Brothers Grimm.


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