Search Bar is Redundant



  • @terere:

    Can you remember the shortcut for over 10 search websites? Probably not. In particular if you only use 2 or 3 most of the time but then need to use search engine number 14. Things which are not visible are easily forgotten. This was one big mistake Microsoft made with Windows 8 and most consulting companies told them so before launch. People don't use things they can't see, because they usually don't remember them. Take that into account. That is a very basic principle in UI design, things which are not visible are usually never used.

    Exactly, it's the same reason why they introduced the ribbon.
    I talked to a Certified Office teacher, around 2009: he hated it because he should have studied everything again.

    Well, there are people that are still using the menu to shut down a PC, or that don't run programs by searching them, or those that were mortally wounded by the lack of a useless START button that only takes up space (thankfully, there is Start Is Gone to get that space back).



  • @g_bartsch:

    "Having a large screen requires imputing a query on the far left and then traveling across the screen to select the engine." This moving all over is difficult for people who have a disability.

    efficient
    [ih-fish-uh nt]
    adjective

    performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort; having and using requisite knowledge, skill, and industry; competent; capable:
    a reliable, efficient assistant.

    satisfactory and economical to use:
    Our new air conditioner is more efficient than our old one.

    producing an effect, as a cause; causative.

    utilizing a particular commodity or product with the least waste of resources or effort (usually used in combination):

    Hope that helps since the rest of my post was clearly lost on you



  • Sorry about my somewhat arrogant response on the previous page - I was mostly addressing the issue of being able to search a URL, not joggling around 40+ search engines.

    I agree the best option would be to make the search bar configurable - in the spirit of good old Opera :)

    But at the same time making sure that if the search bar is switched off - the address bar could function as a proper omnibox - give search suggestions, etc.



  • Well, no real point in discussing this when it's so simple to make this optional.

    But I have to say that it's not that hard to remember the letters for a bunch of different search engines. Or rather, you don't really need to. Just make it logical. Use initials. The single ones will likely be taken quite soon, but that's not really an issue. If for example Y is taken by Yahoo, you can simply assign YT to YouTube.



  • I agree, why even discuss this things when they can be made optional.

    I think its because we are all so afraid of developers just doing what they want in the end. But if Vivaldi sticks true to the Opera spirit they will make most things optional and make everyone happy.



  • Like has been said in this topic before, I would also like to disable search from the omnibox.
    Too often when I enter a local address, it searches for it instead of opening it. This is just annoying to me, with all modern browsers.

    The solution is very simply: just create three different UI-elements: the address bar (only opens the address entered, whether it's valid or not), the Omnibox and the Search Bar.
    Then people can just enable, disable, re-arrange these three elements as they see fit.
    The whole point of Vivaldi is to bring Opera 12 and it's customisability back, not to decide for it's users. If you want the decision made for you, just stick with Chrome, IE, Opera, FireFox or any other browser.
    So there is really no need for a discussion. It should just be configurable.
    The default setting doesn't matter to me at all, since I'm a power user I can change it myself.



  • This is an old thread (although I agree with the sentiments of rvdv who just resurrected it ;)), but for those who agree with the thread title, the option to remove the Search Bar and just have an Omnibox is now available:

    Settings > Search > Display Search Field in Address Bar <<< (deselect)

    (I'm not sure when it became available, but it doesn't seem to have been mentioned in this thread)



  • For a number of Opera versions through the 12.xx series, when I entered a search term in the search box and hit "enter", my search results would open in a new tab. The tab I had open and searched from, remained open and continued to function.

    In Vivaldi, when I enter a search term in the search box, it reuses my original tab. Instead, to save my original tab, I have to open a new tab and search from there.

    Am I missing something, or is there a way to get the search box to behave as it does in Opera 12.xx? I would really appreciate any help available.



  • @litehorse3:

    Am I missing something, or is there a way to get the search box to behave as it does in Opera 12.xx? I would really appreciate any help available.

    No, my guess is that's a far piece down the road for Vivaldi (but doable).

    IIRC that was an option in Opera 12.x, rather than a default behavior, and I don't recall right now how it was set. (I know for sure it isn't how my 12.x installations behave, but I didn't come up with a way to set it in a quick search just now through the Preferences UI or within opera:config.)



  • Thanks gd. Well, I can hope for that along with a sort manager for bookmarks.

    Isn't there some way to use Ctrl + enter or Shift + enter in the url with a new search that opens the search in a new tab? It seems like someone suggested that and it worked for while, but I can't get it going now.



  • @litehorse3:

    Am I missing something, or is there a way to get the search box to behave as it does in Opera 12.xx? I would really appreciate any help available.

    You are right, looks like a regression on recent builds.

    You should file a bug report for that.



  • I never found much use for it in Opera. I nearly always select a word on the page, then search for it with the desired search engine.

    In the few cases where the word or phrase that I want to lookup is not on the page I type it in the URL field, preceded by a keyword if necessary, e.g.

    "w Vivaldi" to search Wikipedia for articles on Vivaldi.



  • Pesala - But when you type the word or phrase on the url line, then the search is in that current tab - you lose what you had been looking at as the tab is reused. I don't want to lose the page I am looking at and right now, I have to go into the Speed Dial page to get the search in a new tab.



  • @litehorse3:

    Pesala - But when you type the word or phrase on the url line, then the search is in that current tab - you lose what you had been looking at as the tab is reused. I don't want to lose the page I am looking at and right now, I have to go into the Speed Dial page to get the search in a new tab.

    I have never found that much of a problem either. Usually, I want to search and then return to the current tab, so I just copy what I want and GestureLeft to go back:
    @Wikipedia:

    Antonio Lucio Vivaldi (Italian: [anˈtɔːnjo ˈluːtʃo viˈvaldi]; 4 March 1678 – 28 July 1741) was an Italian Baroque composer, virtuoso violinist, teacher and cleric.

    And if I do want to keep the search results open in a new tab, then I can use Shift Enter to search in a new tab.

    I don't clutter my tab bar with stuff I am neither using at the moment, nor expect to need later today. I currently have seven tabs open. Four are pinned in a stack, including my Received mail tab, which is always open and pinned.



  • @Pesala:

    [
    And if I do want to keep the search results open in a new tab, then I can use Shift Enter to search in a new tab.

    That's the problem. Shift+Enter is broken on latest builds



  • @litehorse3:

    Isn't there some way to use Ctrl + enter or Shift + enter in the url with a new search that opens the search in a new tab? It seems like someone suggested that and it worked for while, but I can't get it going now.

    @Pesala:

    And if I do want to keep the search results open in a new tab, then I can use Shift Enter to search in a new tab.

    Ahhh! [attachment=1191]thumbup-2.gif[/attachment]

    Maybe that's the "setting" I thought I was remembering. Yes, that works nicely in Opera 12.x and I had forgotten about it.

    If Shift+Enter did work in some previous Vivaldi versions, I don't know when it stopped, but FWIW I just checked v1.0.142.32 and it wasn't working in that release, either.
    Attachments:



  • Good old opera teach me to use prefixes for search services. "g" for Google, "w" for wikipedia, "b" for bing and so on. Searching then takes place in address bar like "w search it" for wikipedia or "g search it" for google or simply "search it" for default search provider. The separate search bar I firstly met in firefox, which I always treat as Internet Explorer younger, but still backward, brother. Never used it, never liked it.



  • @Cidel_Fastro:

    @g_bartsch:

    "Having a large screen requires imputing a query on the far left and then traveling across the screen to select the engine." This moving all over is difficult for people who have a disability.

    efficient
    [ih-fish-uh nt]
    adjective

    performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort; having and using requisite knowledge, skill, and industry; competent; capable:
    a reliable, efficient assistant.

    satisfactory and economical to use:
    Our new air conditioner is more efficient than our old one.

    producing an effect, as a cause; causative.

    utilizing a particular commodity or product with the least waste of resources or effort (usually used in combination):

    Hope that helps since the rest of my post was clearly lost on you

    Funny. I agree with you that minimizing mouse travel is efficient and you respond with sarcasm. Explain what other thing I missed in your post; perhaps it was too subtle.



  • rvdv gives a good argument for doing away with the omnibox. I remember being frustrated with the new omnibox when all I wanted to do was input a URL. There used to be shortcuts, too, that would attach the .com, .net, etc., but I think only ctrl+enter has survived, for .com. After getting used to the omnibox, though, the search bar has outlived its usefulness, I think. It would be nice if they brought back some of the old shortcuts (say, alt+enter for .org), but typing .org or .net at the end in the omnibox is easy enough, in my opinion.

    It sounds like many folks would enjoy the cVim browser extension, which lets you do most surfing and searching with only your keyboard. It's very customizable. Hit 'b' on the keyboard (or change it, if you like) and you're instantly searching through your bookmarks. Another key lets you search through your history. And you could set up any number of custom searches. The home run is the default 'f', which lights up every link, text box, radio button, and check box with an easy letter combination, which you type in order to click on the thing you want. You can really fly through the websites, once you get used to it.



  • How about an option to hide the search field AND and option to disable search in the address bar?


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