Open link in same tab



  • Suggestion for right-clicking on hyperlink: add option, "Open link in same tab". This would override a 'target="_blank"' parameter, so that the new link is forced to open in the same tab, rather than a new tab.



  • Right-click, Copy link, then Paste and Go (Ctrl Shift V) is one way to do this already.



  • Sure, one can always use three clicks to paste various links. I am looking for a more straightforward approach.



  • @mikeyww:

    Suggestion for right-clicking on hyperlink: add option, "Open link in same tab". This would override a 'target="_blank"' parameter, so that the new link is forced to open in the same tab, rather than a new tab.

    +1
    This would also override javascript handlers



  • Never mind; an extension does exactly this.


  • Moderator

    To my way of thinking, extensions are only inefficient and undesirable stop-gap measures, to be used until such time as the option can be built into the browser. Therefore, the fact that there is an extension for something is no excuse not to ask for it as a built-in option. :)



  • I have no objections!

    Mike



  • @Ayespy:

    To my way of thinking, extensions are only inefficient and undesirable stop-gap measures, to be used until such time as the option can be built into the browser. Therefore, the fact that there is an extension for something is no excuse not to ask for it as a built-in option. :)

    Yes, even worse than work arounds that take a few extra steps.

    To my mind, extensions should only ever need to be installed for adding functions that don't usually exist in browsers not for adding customisability. For example, an application like Kindle Cloud Reader



  • @Ayespy:

    To my way of thinking, extensions are only inefficient and undesirable stop-gap measures, to be used until such time as the option can be built into the browser. Therefore, the fact that there is an extension for something is no excuse not to ask for it as a built-in option. :)

    No two users are alike. Extensions potentially allow everyone to have their browser just the way they like it. Trying to build every possible customization in the browser is impossible.
    That way of thinking - "Everything what we deem necessary should be built in, and everything else you don't need" is IMO what started Opera's downward spiral. Firefox introduced people to the flexibility of extensions, and Opera remained in the nineties.


  • Moderator

    The great strength, and the great weakness, of Chromium is its multi-process architecture. One crashed tab doesn't have to bring down the whole show (though it often does anyway), BUT it gobbles up processor cycles and RAM like there's no tomorrow. SO - how can we improve matters? Oh, I know. let's make every option that anyone wants require an extension, so that we can add even more processes and RAM hunger to the mix. Brilliant! AND… this has the additional advantage of a sufficiently fragmented development process that at any time, any part of it may become incompatible with any other part of it, and cease functioning. Further, any extension author may, at any time, abandon his work and let the rest of the hodge-podge go on without him, thereby adding more unpredictability and excitement to matters, so that browser use can be a real adventure.

    On the other hand, within one single process, with a sensible RAM overhead, the features offered by literally hundreds of extensions can be subsumed. How dull. To make things more boring, all of these features can be QC'ed, coordinated and folded in to the overall product seamlessly, so that intraoperability is ensured and surprises minimized. Positively coma-inducing. Where's the adventure?

    THEN, when every reasonably manageable way of looking at, interacting with, or accessing the data of the web has been integrated under a single umbrella, let's say we ALSO offer the option of adding on extensions to achieve an almost infinite conformability, so that literally no one is left out. Really? A browser ANYONE could appreciate? Don't be ridiculous, right?

    I always, during the days of OldeOpera, advocated for this latter approach. And it was eminently successful, too. The fly in the ointment was NEVER that there were too many choices, options, features and looks to be maintained. It was always that web development and engine compatibility were a continually moving target. And trying to keep Presto compatible with the Web, or vice-versa (through promotion of standards), became an impossible mission. There was never an attitude of "Everything that we deem necessary should be built in, and everything else you don't need" but had there been, it still would have never had nearly the impact on operations that compatibility issues did.

    So thanks for your opinion, but I, and I think Jon as well, have a rather different take on the matter. To the degree individual preferences and needs can be integrated into a single package, it is reasonable to try to do so. What CANNOT be managed, can then be the subject of extensions. That's my view.



  • @Ayespy:

    THEN, when every reasonably manageable way of looking at, interacting with, or accessing the data of the web has been integrated under a single umbrella, let's say we ALSO offer the option of adding on extensions to achieve an almost infinite conformability, so that literally no one is left out. Really? A browser ANYONE could appreciate? Don't be ridiculous, right?

    I read your post before this one as advocating against extensions all together. It seems I was mistaken.
    I am all for customizable browser as long as it does not impact performance or stability. I am also a proponent of a powerful extension API (something on the level of Firefox). If it's a choice between these two, I'd chose extensions, but it seems we don't have to. Vivaldi is getting more and more customizable with every release.



  • This feature is present in Opera 12, it's named just "Open" and it does exactly what you are asking for - it overrides the _target="blank" attribute.

    [attachment=2851]open.png[/attachment]

    I'm using the trick proposed by Pesala, but I miss this "old" Opera feature…
    Attachments:


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