Annoying "border" around the edge of the window; cannot close browser in upper-right corner



  • As the title of my post implies, there is a slight "border" around the edge of Vivaldi's window at the top, which means I cannot throw my mouse cursor to the upper-right of the screen to close the window. I have to precisely "aim" my cursor in order to click the X button. Is this going to be fixed before the official release of Vivaldi? (I only tested this on Linux; not Windows or Mac.)



  • Yes, on top there is a slight area which does not react to clicks.

    You can switch to display with the Native Window of Linux.

    Open Vivaldi Settings
    Appearance -> [x] Use Native WIndow
    Restart Vivaldi



  • @Gwen-Dragon:

    You can switch to display with the Native Window of Linux.

    I prefer not to, since using the native view takes up more space, and it looks uglier. ;) It's the same reason why I do not use the native view in Google Chrome.



  • But the Vivaldi UI on Windows has such zone with a few pixel h/w around buttons, too.



  • @Gwen-Dragon:

    But the Vivaldi UI on Windows has such zone with a few pixel h/w around buttons, too.

    Looks like this issue is not exclusive to Linux, then. I wonder why the UI is designed like that? I have no other applications that do that; only Vivaldi.



  • I told the Linux developer to have a look at.
    Please stay tuned, may be the UI will be changed.



  • I never really noticed this because I use my "native" window manager… until recently when I made a custom webkit-scrollbar extension where the scrollbar button and track are the same width.

    I soon realized there's about a 5px deadspace at the edge that interferes with the scrollbar. (extra annoying because my scrollbars are about 10px) This is also experienced along the bottom when I hide the Status Bar.

    When I uncheck "Use Native Window" this 5px space still interferes with the scrollbar, but it seems to be used as the 'handle' to resize the window.

    Edit:
    Also, This invisible border goes away when the window is maximized.



  • Same issue still exists in Beta 3. When the browser window is maximized, there is a border above the tabs and around the edges. It's actually a deal-breaker for me, since it slows down my workflow. I have to precisely aim in order to select a new tab or close the browser? or else I might accidentally drag the entire window? What is the point of this border? It goes against basic GUI principles.



  • Issue still exists with final version 1.1. Users must still precisely aim to close the window or click on a tab. This "border" around the edges is pointless and only hinders our workflow. I don't know if it's even being looked into anymore…



  • People who design graphical user interfaces but don't understand this issue, should watch this video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3gS9tjACwU

    I expect the Vivaldi crew to want to eventually create a flexible theming/skinning system that might include the window controls as well. A browser aimed at power users should really have the option to have an actual power user GUI as well.



  • @WindowsToLinux:

    @Gwen-Dragon:

    You can switch to display with the Native Window of Linux.

    I prefer not to, since using the native view takes up more space, and it looks uglier. ;)

    Just disable the decoration from the windows manager and it will not take more space.



  • @The_Solutor:

    @WindowsToLinux:

    @Gwen-Dragon:

    You can switch to display with the Native Window of Linux.

    I prefer not to, since using the native view takes up more space, and it looks uglier. ;)

    Just disable the decoration from the windows manager and it will not take more space.

    Was that meant as a joke? I, as the end user, should take it upon myself to change a system-wide setting because of a single application's interface being poorly designed? And no, I don't want to disable window decorations, since that means I will lose access to everything else, such as dragging the title bar to move the window.



  • @kumiponi:

    People who design graphical user interfaces but don't understand this issue, should watch this video:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3gS9tjACwU

    I expect the Vivaldi crew to want to eventually create a flexible theming/skinning system that might include the window controls as well. A browser aimed at power users should really have the option to have an actual power user GUI as well.

    Agreed. The part that starts at 5:18 explains why it's important to have that "infinite" width for "edge" and "corner" buttons. Even the SLIGHTEST padding or border (such as 1 pixel) is all it takes to ruin it. Fitts' Law is as relevant as ever!

    Great quote from the video:
    "…and so it means you can get to those corner areas really, really quickly. […] The X at the top right of some interfaces is really is wedged right into the top, and therefore is infinitely big. But then Apple brought it down and it made it into a circle. So they moved the target from being infinitely massive to a tiny little circle, just by bringing it in just by a couple pf pixels from the edge, which is kind of silly of them."

    Sounds familiar? ;)



  • @WindowsToLinux:

    Was that meant as a joke? I, as the end user, should take it upon myself to change a system-wide setting because of a single application's interface being poorly designed? And no, I don't want to disable window decorations, since that means I will lose access to everything else, such as dragging the title bar to move the window.

    No was meant as a suggestion from a linux user since the '98.

    Decorations can be set per app and or per windows class in many windows manager, and for the re cord that was the only solution to get rid of the decoration in Opera, and still is the ONLY solution for many other browser.

    Just google before reply.



  • Okay, perfect. So how do I keep the Minimize, Maximize, and Close buttons if I were to remove the window decoration? (Which, by the way, I am only trying to figure out since the Vivaldi designers are not applying Fitts' Law properly.)

    I already know about window decorations, and I an curious to see how you disable them while retaining all of the above buttons and features.

    Furthermore, Google Chrome, which uses its own title bar and buttons (if you don't enable the native window decoration/border) does not suffer from this issue. There is no padding around the buttons or tabs. They got it right, and kept it right.



  • @WindowsToLinux:

    Okay, perfect. So how do I keep the Minimize, Maximize, and Close buttons if I were to remove the window decoration?

    For the record I've filed a bug, months ago, about an option to have some equivalent buttons with the decoration disabled.

    But really one can live w/o them. Keboard shorcuts, ALT+drag, and contextual menus are there fo a reason.

    Also with some WM (Openbox, for example) can be quickly enabled and disabled at will

    Furthermore, Google Chrome, which uses its own title bar and buttons (if you don't enable the native window decoration/border) does not suffer from this issue. There is no padding around the buttons or tabs. They got it right, and kept it right.

    I can't see the point of such analogies. Chrome is another program, built in another way, by another company, with different aims and a different user base.



  • Even though the developers added an option (not even default!) to remove the spacing above tabs in a maximized window, the current issue still exists with the window corners, especially in regards to the "X" button to close the browser.

    This is one step towards that direction, but Fitt's law is still being overlooked for the "X" button and anything in the upper corners of the window: https://forum.vivaldi.net/topic/6177/ui-annoyance/6

    If a throw my mouse cursor to the upper left, I cannot click on the "V" menu button. If I throw my mouse cursor to the upper right, I cannot click on the "X" close button. I just end up dragging the window unintentionally.





  • Still the same issue, even with version 1.7.



  • Still exists on 1.13. This has been known and reported in the past. Sorry, but this is a deal-breaker for me as a viable web browser on Linux. Had hopes for Vivaldi, but with Google Chrome and the new Firefox Quantum, I've given up on Vivaldi. :( I really, really wanted it to work, especially since it carries the spirit and feel of the classic Opera browser.


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