Technologies behind Vivaldi browser



  • I personally have faith in Vivaldi and their team to lead the browser towards the best development path so that they could have the best browser possible.

    Again, I don't actually care for Brave. Other than it's nice UI and stuff, it's really way too barebones for me, and so I don't love it. Heck, Opera 37 is my secondary browser in case I want a little more stability/smoothness every now and then, but still want to use keyboard shortcuts and mouse gestures. Even then, I find myself turning to Opera less and less as we move forward with Vivaldi.

    I only wanted to know if Vivaldi will eventually write all their own stuff little by little, replacing and disposing Chromium's code that they're not using, and it looks like they're going to go that way in the future so that we get the most customizability, and speed and efficiency of resources. It'll also ensure that Vivaldi doesn't get screwed by Google should they try making any changes to knock out healthy competition.

    And I agree, this snapshot does load pages faster than the last snapshot. Although Opera now has an ad-block, which makes it load pages just a tiny hair faster than Vivaldi, it doesn't really matter. Vivaldi still loads pages really fast, and it's UI speed just needs some optimizing and polishing.

    I would assume, and hope, that Vivaldi does become at least somewhat light on resources compared to Chrome, and improves in performance better than any browser out there, because they're looking out for their customers and their friends, and because old Opera is very light and very fast and very polished. That's all I'm hoping for in the future. How they get there, I'm sure they've got it figured out.



  • Brave is co-opting the ad functionality to monetize their thing. Vivaldi integrates uBlock origin and uMatrix, as addons.

    Try using those with Brave. They want to control ad display, not to let users do so.

    However, I admit my look at Brave was early, and I was unsure how to delete history. It appears they want to profile and then sell user access to advertisers, targeted ads, even if collecting "anonymous" data.

    How does Vivaldi monetize things to pay for its ongoing development? What is that aspect of its business model?


  • Moderator

    @eric.z:

    Brave is co-opting the ad functionality to monetize their thing. Vivaldi integrates uBlock origin and uMatrix, as addons.

    Try using those with Brave. They want to control ad display, not to let users do so.

    However, I admit my look at Brave was early, and I was unsure how to delete history. It appears they want to profile and then sell user access to advertisers, targeted ads, even if collecting "anonymous" data.

    How does Vivaldi monetize things to pay for its ongoing development? What is that aspect of its business model?

    Pre-installed Speed Dial links (static ads) and contracts with search providers. For instance, Google and Yahoo search engines as pre-installed in the browser are routed through a middle-man data vendor. These search engines can be removed and replaced by the user with ones that go direct to the search provider with no middle man but as-installed, they are revenue sources.



  • I think the thing to note about brave is they build it on electron.

    A straight port of chrome would've gave them far more functionality, but it would potentially introduce new cruft when considering features like user privacy. Using electron essentially gives them an easier build platform, but it also forces them to build more functionality themselves. Github and other contributors have basically did all the work of making chromium into a clay you can mold into your own project, but they did that by stripping out most of the things that make chromium a usable browser.

    Google actually did a significant part of making it possible to use chromium as a backend by modeling their own content api after the one in webkit.

    https://www.chromium.org/developers/content-module/content-api

    Projects like CEF and Electron use Content API to sort of talk to chromium's blink engine and make rendering html/css/javascript possible.

    I don't believe it's necessarily a bad tradeoff to build a browser on Electron. I just think that it just means less work in some areas, and more work in others. For example. I don't think a minimal browser like MIN would work as well in concept if they had to build on significant parts of the chromium source code just to get a working prototype.

    https://minbrowser.github.io/min/

    I think Electron is great at small, more focused projects and ideas, but with all things a developer should use the right tool, and/or the tool they are most comfortable with.



  • @d0j0p said in Technologies behind Vivaldi browser:

    Ayespy, as a follow up of our conversation on one of the Vivaldi blogs, it looks like Vivaldi is mode with many web technologies, some of which include: React.js, Node.js/node-webkit, Polymer, and a ton of others. If you look at node-webkit, it's the former name of NW.js, so it looks like Vivaldi is most likely using NW.js.

    Now, I'm hoping that eventually, Vivaldi will be able to strip Chromium code they're not using, that they're already using their own stuff with these web technologies, and become independent and control their development. But anyway, I'm pretty sure they do use NW.js.

    Couldn't find Vivaldi on NW's app page:
    https://github.com/nwjs/nw.js/wiki/List-of-apps-and-companies-using-nw.js

    Vivaldi may want to be put on the list?


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