Bookmark extension/program suggestions?



  • Looking for a Bookmarks extension or program that closely replicates the logic and efficiency of Opera 12’s bookmark system. That was a dream to use. Simple 2 column organization; when you highlight the left item the contents are instantly displayed on the right. Simple and fast copy/cut and pasting. Like Windows Explorer in XP. Windows 7 necessitates you to hit Enter to display contents....what a waste of time. Imagine doing that a thousand times a day organizing your files! Vivaldi’s Bookmark system is a disaster. Why even bother relying on a browser to do everything? Some people have thousands of bookmark items, others have just a handful they are researching that day. Everybody’s different so why not focus the energies of the browser’s design team on just the browser’s actions browsing the internet? Its like email: Some people use an email program but more and more people are using webmail as it improves. The browser shouldn’t even bother with email. Operamail was a great program but many other programs are fine in this area too. It just seems like a large waste of time to diversify away from your core direction. So....any suggestions for an efficient and logical bookmark extension or program? Ideally a program as then it can stand independent when using multiple browsers. With the complexity of the internet this is becoming more and more common among more advanced users. You just can’t expect one browser to do everything. Its just unrealistic. Bookmarks are extremely important when compiling information. Its time we allocated a lot more respect to this area. Most peoples' lists are a mess and because of that, they find organizing their newly acquired information a headache when it doesn't need to be. Its like not using a file cabinet properly and just tossing papers into a drawer then wondering why you can't find anything.



  • @sam_neil:

    Looking for a Bookmarks extension or program that closely replicates the logic and efficiency of Opera 12’s bookmark system. That was a dream to use. … Vivaldi’s Bookmark system is a disaster. Why even bother relying on a browser to do everything? ... Its like email: ... The browser shouldn’t even bother with email. ...

    Why do it? Because it can be done, as your statement proves: Opera 12 did it. Many of the devs who gave you Olde Opera are in process of creating Vivaldi. Of course, things that could be done easily in Presto Opera, in part because the devs had control of the rendering engine and its APIs as well as their GUI, now such things have to be done in considerably different ways using somebody else's rendering engine architecture and APIs… in fact, some things might not be do-able at all in a way that comes across as equivalent to Opera. But at the end of the day, I have every confidence Vivaldi will end up with a flexible, highly-refined bookmarking system.

    I disagree with your assessment of Vivaldi's present bookmarks system as being a disaster. A 'disaster' was Blink Opera's initial exclusion of any bookmarking as well as any real bookmarks bar. IMO, Vivaldi's bookmarking indeed has a ways to go to attain the full flexibility of Olde Opera, but it's already quite workable for many users, even with its remaining limitations. The design isn't over yet; the groundwork is there to go a long way in coming months.

    To me, bookmarking is an absolutely essential part of a web browser's usefulness, and ought to be integrated into it... just as an index and footnoting ought to be part of a well-written book, especially one which is used as a reference or tool. Personally, I never employed Olde Opera's built-in eMail feature, but I've read quite a few compelling arguments for its inclusion, by those users who learned to develop work habits surrounding a built-in and well-integrated eMail feature.

    Building-in something very often allows much-enhanced data and display flow back and forth between the browser and the included feature (tighter integration and performance) than that achieved by simply bolting on a single-function extension. Moreover, extensions open up two primary problem areas: security and stability. The more players involved in creating functionality, the greater the vetting needed to be done by a user to assure clean and safe code; likewise, the more independent pieces which are involved in providing a given functionality, the greater the chances that they won't be updated or tested for compliance in lock-step with each other as browser versions naturally evolve... and that's a recipe for recurring instability.


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