Best feature of Microsoft Edge



  • We should all be glad that Microsoft are finally making a good browser, it will influence owners of websites to improve. One really good feature in Edge is the "reading view", which makes some otherwise hopelessly cluttered websites readable. It is, of course, not good enough - some items in the article you read are not rendered right - but it is a good idea. I really would like to see an improved version of it in Vivaldi. Preferably together with an option to NEVER ever automatically start audio or video playback.



  • @bv:

    We should all be glad that Microsoft are finally making a good browser, it will influence owners of websites to improve.

    Preferably together with an option to NEVER ever automatically start audio or video playback.

    Some years ago Microsoft was very powerful and ruled parts of world wide standardization processes but it looks like they have lost this position to Google. Website developers of today will rather take a look at Android's Chrome than at Microsoft's Edge.

    If you open the page chrome://settings/content and switch "Plugins" to 'Let me choose when to run plugin content', you won't be pestered by unwanted audio and video so much.



  • hello bv
    cannot pass up this chance to say that the best feature of edge is that it can be used to download vivaldi.
    I like the clean edge.
    manage plug-ins as RJules3 indicates +
    the plug-in preferences can be set to_ always begin video, paused.
    I have side-stepped reading view up to now; always allowing the full beauty of the web to pummel and populate the view.
    clear-reading view is add-on. get to those after optimization fulfilled. right? surely.



  • I agree Edge is fine for downloading Vivaldi, but it is also a sign that Google now has some real competition in the mainstream. Firefox has devolved into a has-been, just like Opera. Vivaldi is not really for the mass market, it is for the clueful minority.

    I really hope we will get rid of plugins in browsers, they have always been a source of more problems than they are worth. Being able to fine tune what the browser does will be the killer feature of Vivaldi, and having per website settings of what to render and what to ignore would be the icing on the cake.



  • @bv:

    […] plugins in browsers, they have always been a source of more problems than they are worth. Being able to fine tune what the browser does will be the killer feature of Vivaldi, and having per website settings of what to render and what to ignore would be the icing on the cake.

    Yep. I do not want to load tens of plug-ĩns to get a good browser - that's the thing that always kept me away from Firefox (plus the 'You MUST have Firefox' craze from years ago :-) ) I want a browser with ok standard features plus the ability to fine-tune them (that's what got me into Opera and now Vivaldi)



  • I agree that plugins shouldn't always be a requirement - that's why I personally a) never understood the obsession with extensions that Firefox and Chrome users "forced on" old Opera and b) why the current Vivaldi beta users are once again bleating on about "my extension doesn't work… FIX VIVALDI" ;)


  • Moderator

    @mossman:

    I agree that plugins shouldn't always be a requirement - that's why I personally a) never understood the obsession with extensions that Firefox and Chrome users "forced on" old Opera and b) why the current Vivaldi beta users are once again bleating on about "my extension doesn't work… FIX VIVALDI" ;)

    Yup. Every new extension is a new process that has to run while Vivaldi is open. Vivaldi is already at a slight disadvantage resource-wise and speed-wise strictly by virtue of the fact that the UI is not native, but rather built with web technologies. It can not only overcome this, but also outstrip other Chromium-based browsers by eliminating the need for extensions. The more functions, options and setting that can be built in as is Vivaldi's plan from the outset, the lighter footprint the browser will impose, and the more nimble it can be in action. Then, too, with everything built in, the constant nagging problem with extensions becoming incompatible or unsupported as the browser evolves, is eliminated. A win for everyone, all-round.



  • Script and Content blocking isn't really working with Vivaldi and Passwords and Bookmarks could all disappear or get scrambled at almost any time. The Extensions I've found are alright for now but at the very minimum HTML5 needs an On/Off switch that works. :|

    I haven't seen it yet with Vivaldi but some Extensions are made necessary by the developers themselves and sometimes it's just easier to use an Extension than it is to try to get the problem fixed.

    A couple of examples from Opera 12:
    The "Enable plug-ins only on demand" feature was broken. Some cretin came up with a Flash exploit and it turned out that the Flash plugin was actually being loaded and run, it just wasn't displaying anything so you still got hit with the exploit but didn't get to see the content.

    The ability to turn off images was broken too and some images were still downloaded and interpreted but not displayed. Even deleting the MIME type wouldn't work because there was the option to detect content instead of depending on the MIME type so there was a good chance exploit would run anyway.

    The reason for both of those problems was that the developers used a different definition of "only" and "off". Apparently, some users didn't like the delay if images were disabled and had to be downloaded or when a plug-in really did have to be enabled and loaded before the content could run. <facepalm>"Hel-l-l-o-o-o, Flash and Image Extensions!"</facepalm>


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