Opera launched it's first Linux version in years. What do you think?


  • Vivaldi Team

    Hi, Opera has finally made a developers version of it's browser available on Linux. It's only available as a deb installer which means that it is aimed at Debian based systems like Linux Mint and Ubuntu. What do you think of this new attempt from Opera to have an offering for the Linux user? You can read about and download it [url=http://bit.ly/1pJdIEt]here[/url]



  • At this time : only bad things :)

    Waiting for (just few examples) :

    • Remove ugly Ubuntu interface,
    • Possibility to remove pre-installed search engines and make other to be default,
    • Better tab management,
    • Autofilling addressbar only with bookmarks (or speedials)
    • etc.


  • I fired up LMDE to look how it works with Linux - but I see no reason to prefer it over the regular Chromium, especially because it lacks several things the base has and it is not as stable …

    ... additionally it looks too Ubuntu.

    I have removed it again - no need for more experimental stuff on my computer.



  • I'm on Ubuntu 12.04. I downloaded and installed Opera 24 Dev for Linux and … well, it's worth nothing. Don't like it, won't use it.


  • Vivaldi Team

    As for me it wouldn't even run. I'm running Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 so it's not like I'm on some esoteric distro. Go figure.



  • Only x64 :(



  • Well, I'm running 32-bit, so I can't run it to test it. Not that I'll be doing that when one turns up, because I've long since lost interest in Opera due to the unreasonable length of time it's taken for them to come up with a Linux version while being given evasive answers. Anyway, it's so crippled, minimalistic and derivative, which is not why I used Opera in the first place.



  • It only works for me when I run it as sudo. This is really bad…
    Maybe this can help someone :)

    Tested on Ubuntu x64 and Arch



  • The only file I can get from Opera is as mentioned for Debian running on AMD64 (opera-developer_24.0.1537.0_amd64.deb)…

    Using openSuse on Intel (32bit).

    Not much use to me as yet.



  • There are ways to install *.deb files on non-Debian systems (without actually installing dpkg and apt and all that, I mean I'm sure you could do that too). Years ago there was a package named "alien" intended for just this … probably still exists but I haven't looked recently. Also Ruario posted steps to do it manually. Mind you, Arch has already made their own package ...



  • not for me thanks , i stay with my old 12



  • @sgunhouse:

    There are ways to install *.deb files on non-Debian systems (without actually installing dpkg and apt and all that, I mean I'm sure you could do that too). Years ago there was a package named "alien" intended for just this … probably still exists but I haven't looked recently. Also Ruario posted steps to do it manually. Mind you, Arch has already made their own package ...

    Could not locate 'Alien' either through the app managemnt system or Zypper.
    I will check Ruario's post for his steps. All I've been able to locate so far are steps involving Alien. As there is no source I can't build install from that.



  • @greybeard:

    Could not locate 'Alien' either through the app managemnt system or Zypper.

    Here is the Alien homepage with download links and the Git repo: http://joeyh.name/code/alien/


  • Vivaldi Team

    Informed sources have told me that the problem if that Opera for Linux won't run if you have Chrome installed as default browser. Issuing the following command should get Opera running regardless:

    opera-developer –with-feature:first-run-import=false &

    Enjoy! (I didn't)



  • Looking at the comments under that Desktop Team blog entry, I was scratching my head because people were complaining that Debian users like me were getting preferential treatment from Opera.

    I run Debian's stable release, and the only reason I was reading that blog last night was that I wondered why the company was letting that 'opera-developer' file show up as a new package in aptitude on my system when it was openly admitting its own incompatibility with Wheezy's version of libc6. Do they expect me to see that red line on the screen and start chomping at the bit for a dist-upgrade to Jessie just for a chance to see how much their browser won't let me do with it anymore? :silly:

    I can't even be angry about it, though. It's too pathetic.



  • Just a few thoughts:

    Even on the blog screenshot the new tab page is full of advertisements and tracking cookies. Chromium is ad-free (and Chrome only advertises Google's own services on the "Apps" page).

    Doesn't allow to set a custom search engine as default search engine. Chromium allows that.

    Doesn't allow to disable address bar keylogging (everything transmitted to Google automatically in real-time). Chromium allows that.

    Doesn't come with source code. Chromium does.

    Why would anyone in the world want to use that thing? Even if you never used Presto and actually like Chrome? Why would you want to restrict yourself and switch to Opera?



  • The thing for me is that I will only touch a closed source program if it excels at what it does by a wide margin. I set a higher bar for using closed source. There is no reason for me to lower that bar for the current implementation of Opera. It offers nothing that I can't find elsewhere that's open source, nor does it improve on anything that I can find elsewhere, or at least not enough to tempt me.



  • I used to be an Opera user on Linux. However now I ask myself - why would I want to install a proprietary browser on an open source OS? FF and Chrome for me.



  • @am2605:

    I used to be an Opera user on Linux. However now I ask myself - why would I want to install a proprietary browser on an open source OS? FF and Chrome for me.

    I presume you mean Chromium, because Chrome is a proprietary browser.

    I do agree with you about not wanting to install a proprietary browser on an open source system, but at the time when Opera 12 and its predecessors were about, it impressed me enough to bend the rules, so to speak. Still, one less guilty pleasure to worry about. ;)



  • Indeed, I did mean Chromium. Thanks for pointing out my mistake :-)


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