Will you continue support of windows xp\2003?



  • Hi! I am an ambassador of ReactOS project. We want to know, will you stop support of Windows xp? ReactOS curently has windows 2003 sp2 as target for compatibility.



  • No response yet suggests that no one cares about Windows XP. I still have an old PC with XP, but rarely use it. I would not give it away to a friend unless I could upgrade it first to at least Windows 7 (my current OS).

    Why use an obsolete OS as your target? The about page on ReactOS still says that Windows 8 is the latest version of Windows



  • @jeditobe:

    Hi!

    I am an ambassador of ReactOS project. We want to know, will you stop support of Windows xp?
    ReactOS curently has windows 2003 sp2 as target for compatibility.

    Nice to see a ReactOS project member here.

    I'm afraid that the question of the XP support is basically in the hands of Google rather than in Vivaldi's ones.

    Vivaldi has not the resources to deeply patch the chromium source code and to backport functions eventually removed.

    So I believe we have just to hope they don't do such move too early.



  • @Pesala:

    No response yet suggests that no one cares about Windows XP. I still have an old PC with XP, but rarely use it. I would not give it away to a friend unless I could upgrade it first to at least Windows 7 (my current OS).

    Why use an obsolete OS as your target? The about page on ReactOS still says that Windows 8 is the latest version of Windows

    Such kind of reply is

    A) Unhelpful. If someone ask where to drink some good wine, "why not drink some beer or coke?" is the last answer that you should give.

    B ) Is a wrong assumption. XP still works pretty, is still used by an huge number of users around the world, and last but not least can receive the security updates for most of its part until 2019 because Posready 2009 (google and learn about it)

    C) According to your metric, Win 7 is obsolete as XP, there are three generations of MS OSes after it (four counting Win 10 1511 released since few days) why are you still using it?



  • @The_Solutor:

    Such kind of reply is

    A) Unhelpful. If someone ask where to drink some good wine, "why not drink some beer or coke?" is the last answer that you should give.

    B ) Is a wrong assumption. XP still works pretty, is still used by an huge number of users around the world, and last but not least can receive the security updates for most of its part until 2019 because Posready 2009 (google and learn about it)

    C) According to your metric, Win 7 is obsolete as XP, there are three generations of MS OSes after it (four counting Win 10 1511 released since few days) why are you still using it?

    Your reply to me was positively rude, and not at all helpful.

    My reply to the OP was more helpful than any before it. XP is no longer supported by MS so it is obsolete, Windows 7 has a lot of life left in it yet, while Windows 10 is not yet mature, so developing for Windows 7 as a target would make more sense than for a still moving target like Windows 10.



  • Isn't a point being missed here? As I understand it, ReactOS is written in C/C++ and intended to allow users to remove Windows and install ReactOS as a drop-in replacement (compatible with the system's existing apps and drivers). Thereafter, it can be maintained in its own right as a safe and functional OS with the passage of time, regardless of Microsoft's obsolescence policies. The target compatibility point right now seems to be WinXP and compatible apps, so the question is being raised whether Vivaldi will continue maintaining WinXP compatibility with its own future development so that it might be a usable program under ReactOS, and for how long into the future. This is particuarly pertinent in terms of the yet-to-be-introduced Vivaldi features like mail, etc. If it looks like Vivaldi XP compatibility will be around for a while, it may make it more reasonable for the ReactOS folks to incorporate it into their compatibility provisioning/testing. Obviously, chromium engine XP compatibility will be a factor, but Vivaldi has a degree of control over what version they elect to use and when to incorporate a chromium update. Right now, this looks like a question regarding Vivaldi's plans and policy in this area.



  • Blackbird - Great response! Thanks for cutting to the OP's original question, responding with a civil answer and providing the rest of us in the Vivaldi Community with information about ReactOS.

    As I do not plan on going beyond Win 7 with a Microsoft OS, I am going to make sure that I follow ReactOS's development for a possible future jump.



  • @Blackbird:

    Isn't a point being missed here? As I understand it, ReactOS is written in C/C++ and intended to allow users to remove Windows and install ReactOS as a drop-in replacement (compatible with the system's existing apps and drivers). Thereafter, it can be maintained in its own right as a safe and functional OS with the passage of time, regardless of Microsoft's obsolescence policies.

    I did not miss that point, but if ReactOS depends on the Vivaldi project maintaining compatibility with Windows XP I suspect that they will be disappointed. We will have to wait for a response from the developers to be sure about that, but I am just saying that in my opinion that is unlikely.

    What benefit is there for Vivaldi in using precious resources on testing compatibility with Windows XP?



  • It would not be easy to keep Vivaldi working with XP because XP uses DirectX 9 and Chrome is supposedly no longer supporting DX9. If you want to cast the incense and light some chicken bones whilst wandering widdershins to evade blacklisting and allow DX9 to continue working with DX11+, go for it. :)


  • Moderator

    Courtesy and politeness to new users and potential users is never out of place.

    That said, ReactOS has been in development since 1998, I've been following it on and off since 2006, and I've not seen appreciable progress. I think their heart is in the right place, but the job is just too big for them. At present, there still is no stable ReactOS operating system, only about 56 drivers, titles or versions of titles of software, have been tested on it, and not all of these work.

    In contrast, there are multiple Linux flavors which are also free, and some of which ape Windows. A slew of Debian versions are so advanced in development that not only do they largely ape windows, they even have plug-and-play for certain devices that you have to have an installer disk to run on Windows. The platform switch is not without peril or rough spots, you do have to change some habits. But in going to many Linux flavors, one is mostly leaving a fully developed and competent OS for another fully developed and competent OS.

    So one may follow ReactOS, or stick with XP for some reason(s) but it's a little like clinging to your old bag phone, or brick phone, or even flip phone. Sure, you can make calls, but the world is moving on, and if you're determined to aim at, or to hold on to, an obsolete technology, it is moving on without you.

    I have a couple of old XP towers that I converted to Lubuntu (in one case) or an Ubuntu offshoot (in another) when MS deprecated XP, and they run much better under the lighter OS than they did when they were new. Further, I can install pretty much anything I want to on them, including Vivaldi 32-bit or 64-bit. Linux has come far enough that I would be comfortable running it on almost anything. Did you know that Android phones run on a modified Linux kernel? Yeah. So if I were looking to jump ship from Windows, that's the direction I would look. But that's just me.



  • @Ayespy:

    Courtesy and politeness to new users and potential users is never out of place.

    No one was discourteous to any new users, The Solutor was rude to me, but I am not a new user so I don't know why you make this comment. Perhaps it was to apologize in advance for your own comments?

    I am now running the latest Vivaldi snapshot on my old Windows XP box. I installed the Flash Player plugin for Chrome/Opera, and that seems to be working OK on the BBC etc.



  • @Blackbird:

    Isn't a point being missed here? As I understand it, ReactOS is written in C/C++ and intended to allow users to remove Windows and install ReactOS as a drop-in replacement (compatible with the system's existing apps and drivers). Thereafter, it can be maintained in its own right as a safe and functional OS with the passage of time, regardless of Microsoft's obsolescence policies. The target compatibility point right now seems to be WinXP and compatible apps, so the question is being raised whether Vivaldi will continue maintaining WinXP compatibility with its own future development so that it might be a usable program under ReactOS, and for how long into the future. This is particuarly pertinent in terms of the yet-to-be-introduced Vivaldi features like mail, etc. If it looks like Vivaldi XP compatibility will be around for a while, it may make it more reasonable for the ReactOS folks to incorporate it into their compatibility provisioning/testing. Obviously, chromium engine XP compatibility will be a factor, but Vivaldi has a degree of control over what version they elect to use and when to incorporate a chromium update. Right now, this looks like a question regarding Vivaldi's plans and policy in this area.

    For the first time in a long time I actually agree with you on something! I've also been keeping an eye on ReactOS but I've never personally tried it as I believe it's an install and use rather than a live USB. I personally cannot be bothered with these virtual machines so I haven't looked at the software. I notice that Russia has been taking a bit of interest in the operating system apart from ROSA Lab and SailOS so maybe React might get some funding.



  • @Pesala:

    No response yet suggests that no one cares about Windows XP. I still have an old PC with XP, but rarely use it. I would not give it away to a friend unless I could upgrade it first to at least Windows 7 (my current OS).

    Why use an obsolete OS as your target? The about page on ReactOS still says that Windows 8 is the latest version of Windows

    A lot of people still care about XP and don't want the spy-ware of Windows 10. I personally prefer to stay on Windows 8.1 than move over to the dreadful 10. When 8.1 becomes old hat the I'm most likely going to move over to BunsenLabs OS or another Linux but I might also look at SailOS, AmigaOS or something else on different and independent hardware helping to shield myself from Intel and AMD spy-chips (vpro). Hopefully the new Russian ARM processors or similar from China will soon be available! There wouldn't be a Vivaldi response to this question since I don't believe anyone from Vivaldi posts on this forum. Unfortunately I believe Google will screw out XP Chromiums so if there's someone using XP type systems then they end up missing out to the planned obsolescence agenda. It would be nice if the AmigaOS would end up utilizing the multicore processors in the AmigaOne X1000/X5000. At the moment AmigaOS doesn't use more than a single core and thus wastes the potential of these decent machines. AmigaOne owners end up paying a fortune for the unit only to end up using Linux for regular work.

    https://www.bunsenlabs.org/
    http://www.amigaos.net/
    http://www.amigaos.net/hardware/133/amigaone-x5000



  • @Pesala:

    @Ayespy:

    Courtesy and politeness to new users and potential users is never out of place.

    No one was discourteous to any new users, The Solutor was rude to me, but I am not a new user so I don't know why you make this comment. Perhaps it was to apologize in advance for your own comments?

    I am now running the latest Vivaldi snapshot on my old Windows XP box. I installed the Flash Player plugin for Chrome/Opera, and that seems to be working OK on the BBC etc.

    I haven't used Flash on my machine for such a long time and I don't miss it at all. If you want to utilize BBC Iplayer without having flash then use the getiplayer software and download the programs direct without the DRM. If you're still desperate to use flash then you can revert back to Internet Explorer or use the Maxthon browser which plays most flash. Personally on my machine BBC Iplayer seems jerky at times but when downloaded without DRM they run perfect so I wouldn't use the iplayer software if you paid me.



  • @Ayespy:

    Courtesy and politeness to new users and potential users is never out of place.

    That said, ReactOS has been in development since 1998, I've been following it on and off since 2006, and I've not seen appreciable progress. I think their heart is in the right place, but the job is just too big for them. At present, there still is no stable ReactOS operating system, only about 56 drivers, titles or versions of titles of software, have been tested on it, and not all of these work.

    In contrast, there are multiple Linux flavors which are also free, and some of which ape Windows. A slew of Debian versions are so advanced in development that not only do they largely ape windows, they even have plug-and-play for certain devices that you have to have an installer disk to run on Windows. The platform switch is not without peril or rough spots, you do have to change some habits. But in going to many Linux flavors, one is mostly leaving a fully developed and competent OS for another fully developed and competent OS.

    So one may follow ReactOS, or stick with XP for some reason(s) but it's a little like clinging to your old bag phone, or brick phone, or even flip phone. Sure, you can make calls, but the world is moving on, and if you're determined to aim at, or to hold on to, an obsolete technology, it is moving on without you.

    I have a couple of old XP towers that I converted to Lubuntu (in one case) or an Ubuntu offshoot (in another) when MS deprecated XP, and they run much better under the lighter OS than they did when they were new. Further, I can install pretty much anything I want to on them, including Vivaldi 32-bit or 64-bit. Linux has come far enough that I would be comfortable running it on almost anything. Did you know that Android phones run on a modified Linux kernel? Yeah. So if I were looking to jump ship from Windows, that's the direction I would look. But that's just me.

    Lubuntu is fine but if you really want to make an old machine sing then an installation of Puppy Linux is a must. I've used many distros on old P4 2.8Ghz performance machines and I believe Puppy is the lightest and you can really feel it. Try opening up lots of videos on Puppy and they'll just keep opening but then try the same on Lubuntu and you'll end up with a struggle depending of course on GPU. I'm actually utilizing LXLE on a laptop of mine because it doesn't overheat my CPU and most importantly its the only lightweight distro I could find which would allow the HDA Jack Reset (alsa-tools-gui) software to cross over my line out jack with the microphone jack as the line out jack is broken. What annoys me is that no one has created a similar piece of software to run on Windows.


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