Question:Is vivaldi suitable for me?



  • Hi everyone, I found vivaldi and i'm looking for a chromium-based browser that can cover my interests: -it can handle too many tabs (just like old opera v12) -i want use my favorite chrome extensions without problem -i want to save sites as PDF (WITHOUT ANY PROBLEM!) Is vivaldi good for me or not?



  • NO

    Its not ready yet, it ll be a while before it becomes stable and you can use extensions without any problem.



  • How well it handles tabs depends on your hardware. It runs about as well as you should expect Chrome or Chromium to run.

    Most extensions work just fine. See this thread where people have been talking about the extensions that work with Vivaldi.

    I don't know if it's possible to save a web page as a pdf. Right click > Save As doesn't give me that option.

    As saudiqbal mentions above, Vivaldi is still in an alpha stage of development, and not all features will be working exactly as you want them to - some may not even exist yet. The devs are polishing the browser up right now and are preparing for an official first beta release, and it will only continue to get more stable as time goes on. You can follow the devs' blog for news about Vivaldi releases and to download the most recent snapshot.

    In my experience, on average, Vivaldi runs very smoothly and without any obvious bugs. It loads pages at least as quickly as other browsers, even if its UI can sometimes be a bit sluggish. It's stable enough for most things, and I use it as my default browser. However, I would not currently recommend using it for things that involve sensitive information, like online banking. But then, I'm one of those paranoid people.


  • Moderator

    Yes, it's possible to save a page as PDF under the print dialogue. The option is under "destination" where you select a printer.

    Whether the browser at this stage is "suitable" has little to do with features and everything to do with the temperament of the person. If you have the patience, fortitude and flexibility to test software, it's suitable for you even if you prefer not to make it your default at this time.



  • Apart from 'annoyance' kinds of issues (lost speed-dial thumbnails, oddities in layout, limitations about certain extensions, etc), the browser functions in a stable way. As @ayespy notes, its suitability depends greatly on the user's own temperament. As new promised features are added, previously-working things will get broken from time to time and may require multiple versions to fully restore… but that's 'normal life' when testing software under development.

    Unless disk space is at a premium on your system for some reason or unless your temperament can't take the "testing" sort of thing, I'd say just try Vivaldi for a time. That's what I've done from the first version, and my usage of Vivaldi has climbed from 15% to over 95% of the time. It's still not my 'default' browser simply because of a many-years-long personal policy of never using software that hasn't been "final-released" for my most critical computer needs. (That has more to do with audit-trails than basic performance or reliability.)



  • My hardware:
    i7-2600k
    p8p67
    4gb ddr3-1600
    ssd sata2

    i Have problem with all chromium-based browser,I tested 7-8 different Browser they can handle various numbers of tabs the worst is Google Chrome even with latest updates cant handle more than 40-50 tabs.
    every browser has its own advantages and dis-advantages.

    one thing and most important thing that i need is fully customizable browser.this is number one fact of Vivaldi that i like.



  • A large proportion of the complaints and issues that I see reported are by users who like to open many tabs. If you are going to use any Chrome-based browser you need to change your habits because each tab starts a new process. That's good in that if a tab crashes, it does not crash the browser, but on the downside it uses more resources. When it comes to the number of tabs:
    [ol]

    • Twenty is plenty
    • Thirty is dirty
    • Forty is naughty
      [/ol]
      There are other workflows that are more efficient than just opening lots of new tabs such as:
      [ol]
    • Bookmark related tabs in the same folder and open the folder only when you need to work on that project
    • Learn to use the browsing History on the Speed Dial to reopen closed tabs
    • Assign nicknames to favourite pages to open them quickly from the address field
      [/ol]


  • @RRR13:

    I hate that little tabs number poem AND I strongly disagree with it as well.

    You can hate it and disagree all you like, but it doesn't change the facts. Vivaldi will use more resources than Opera 12.17 for the same number of tabs.

    Users who open too many tabs waste time trying to find the one that they want from the clutter when they could reopen it using a nickname or bookmark just as easily.

    They were the ones on My Opera who had most of the problems with crashing, slow startup, etc., while most of us did not. Polls on My Opera and here indicated that most users open 20 or fewer tabs, so a minority of users request fancy tab management features that most users don't need.

    How Many Tabs? (60% use 20 or fewer, 75% use 30 or fewer tabs)



  • Software should do what the user wants, not restrict the user to what it can do without breaking. I don't myself use very large numbers of tabs, but that doesn't mean we should tell those who do that they are "doing it wrong". It's the crummy Chromium engine, the Internet Exploder of our times.



  • @jaxtraw:

    Software should do what the user wants, not restrict the user to what it can do without breaking. I don't myself use very large numbers of tabs, but that doesn't mean we should tell those who do that they are "doing it wrong". It's the crummy Chromium engine, the Internet Exploder of our times.

    It's not about right or wrong, it's about wisdom. Every functional thing in the real world has some kind of operational limit, beyond which results or performance deteriorate. While it's fine for designers or users to try to press and expand the limits of something, it's not the best nor wisest routine operational way to proceed when simply using the 'thing'. We can argue until the cows come home about the pro's and con's of a given rendering engine, but the reality is that they ALL trade off performance/problems for multiplicity of tabs. Some engines may handle high tab-count more gracefully than others, but the cost of that lies elsewhere. The real world user issue is how to 'drive' a browser best… and driving it consistently at red-line is bound to risk hiccups and breakdowns, compared with 'driving' it at reasonable levels.

    Frankly, I'm personally at a loss trying to understand the practical advantage of having 55 tabs open as compared with having 55 bookmarks instantly available. If it's to reduce access time, that might be fine... except that on any engine, having high tab counts slows the entire system as well as the browser and increases the risk of problems and malfunctions - especially where high graphics content is involved on many of the tabs. I feel the best approach is several open tabs (where log-ins are involved) and lots of accessible bookmarks. in any case, wisdom tells me to choose my browser for the particular need I have and live within its reasonable limitations thereby imposed. If I want to constantly live in its red-line zone, I have no reason to complain when something breaks or flies off into space.



  • Bookmarking is not easy for everyone,specially when your down stream speed is low.
    Plus bookmarking is another problem in the damn chromium-based browsers.
    when bookmarks numbers increasing browser bookmark manager totally dying.
    My bookmark file was 35 MB.
    all the browsers isn't the same some have better performance some are dumb as shit (google chrome).
    I solve that problem with saving webpages as pdf,but problem of too many tabs still is unsolved. Unfortunately browser that can handle many tabs have other problems like:

    -cannot save pages as pdf
    -problem with some extensions that i'm using
    -unwanted ads
    -other dumb problems

    You see I can write a Full-featured bookmark about chromium-based browsers because I test almost every browser that you does know or doesn't know.

    I think it can reachable for vivaldi. only if vivaldi take user's feed back.



  • @Blackbird:

    Frankly, I'm personally at a loss trying to understand the practical advantage of having 55 tabs open as compared with having 55 bookmarks instantly available.

    Yes, it's either about access times and enyoing reading over the course of several days.

    I mostly use my browser a) to read news magazines (politics and technology).
    For the news I prefer to have my pages open all the time (at best: grouped and pinned), because each page is just one <ctrl>+ <tab>away.
    My 2nd main browsing purpose are fora, unfortunately big ones having huuuuge and looong threads. To organize reading those and keeping track of each current page I consider (virtual) bookmarks (or history) too cumbersome nowadays. For me it's simply the page/tab numbers which have shifted the sweet-spot here as compared to my browsing habits ten years ago.

    @Blackbird:

    except that on any engine, having high tab counts slows the entire system as well as the browser and increases the risk of problems and malfunctions -

    Well, I didn't have implemented a browser engine by myself yet, but I doubt that there's a limit like that in practice.
    At least, with Firefox I encountered all kinds of problems throughout the years, but the number of open tabs had never been an obvious issue for me.
    Don't get me wrong, there will be some absolute limit for sure, just because every tab will use some resources for their plain administration w/o the content even in absence of a 1-process-per-tab pattern. But using a combination of lazy page loading and unload on need should raise that bar quite good, shouldn't it?
    At least, my glacia ancient iPad 2 can handle many open tabs quite well. Yes, switching tabs is mostly not instant (page reloading) but it saves me cumbersome bookmark management and history browsing.

    I'm really looking forward completely switching to Vivaldi her on my desktop machine. But when it's about configuring my Surface Pro 4 (yes, finally it's time to get one) I don't know wether I will like to pay the price add-on for the 8GB RAM configurations just to be prepared for chromium-based browsing.

    But first I'll wait until the 1st round of Vivaldi optimizations is done.

    someone</tab></ctrl>


  • Moderator

    One of the publics Jon has said he wants to serve (has mentioned this in a couple of interviews) is "people who like to keep a lot of tabs open." Now the value "a lot" is pretty vague. To me, 50 is A LOT of tabs. I like to stay below 30. My average is below 20. Still, there are guys who routinely run over 100, which to me is just nuts.

    All that said, given that Jon wants to cater to people who use "a lot" of tabs, what I expect to happen is for the developers, in time, to do everything possible, considering the constraints of the architecture of the browser engine, to accommodate users whose tab use exceeds the norm - lazy tab loading, background tab suspension, , etc. etc. When they hit the wall of what's possible with this engine, they will have done their jobs, and many "tabs extremists" will still complain bitterly. So they will need to use some other browser.



  • A lot of tabs or not (I never have too many tabs open), I like the concept. It looks and feels different, it suits my workflow (can't wait for the mail tab to be finished), it's designed beautifully, and it's nice to see a company that still values and develops desktop browsers, and not only focusing on mobile while keeping the desktop version as a half-assed side product.

    TP4 has its bugs, it doesn't open some pages, but I've filed bug reports for it, but so far, so good. Way to go, Vivaldi team!


  • Moderator

    @nlatin:

    A lot of tabs or not (I never have too many tabs open), I like the concept. It looks and feels different, it suits my workflow (can't wait for the mail tab to be finished), it's designed beautifully, and it's nice to see a company that still values and develops desktop browsers, and not only focusing on mobile while keeping the desktop version as a half-assed side product.

    TP4 has its bugs, it doesn't open some pages, but I've filed bug reports for it, but so far, so good. Way to go, Vivaldi team!

    If you're using TP4, you need to update to Snapshot 1.0.300.5

    There has been a LOT of progress in the seventeen snapshots since TP4, and the latest version can be obtained at https://vivaldi.net/



  • Hi!

    Thanks for the heads up. I'd just like to know - How do the updates work then? Are those two separate update channels, and one (where after TP4 comes Beta) is 'stable' or for 'common users', and the snapshot one is going to be constantly updated?

    Thanks.


  • Moderator

    @nlatin:

    Hi!

    Thanks for the heads up. I'd just like to know - How do the updates work then? Are those two separate update channels, and one (where after TP4 comes Beta) is 'stable' or for 'common users', and the snapshot one is going to be constantly updated?

    Thanks.

    For the time being, once you have installed a snapshot, you will get popups offering updated versions for every release, whether the release is a snapshot or a technical preview. If you have only ever installed a technical preview, you will also only get update notifications for technical previews. So it's kind of like two streams, but one stream only includes TPs and the other includes everything. So, yeah, kind of like a noob channel and a nerd channel.

    I suspect that once we have a stable build, there will be three update channels, and at that time, developer snapshots will probably only update to other developer snapshots, betas will only update to betas, and stable will only update to stable.



  • For me, the key issue will be whether the browser updating for all channels remains optional or under user choice, which I think is the path Vivaldi will follow, as it does now. For my needs, system stability is critical, and pushed/forced updates work against that. There are browsers and operating systems (ie: Win10) that now force updates to their programs, and those too often can create serious instability issues for numbers of unlucky users who get hit with problems 'out of the blue'. Even for 'experimental' programs (like Vivaldi's snapshots), I want control over when or whether I update, though I also use portable or stand-alone installations for such software to minimize the system impact in case of a berserk version. Before I update anything on my systems, I check online for early-adopter comments regarding the update to see if or what negative reactions there might be.



  • Here is how to keep Vivaldi or other Chromium-based browsers from choking on too many Tabs at startup. The Vivaldi Tab and title bar will say chrome://flags but it's a nit.

    vivaldi://flags

    (Radiation Warning Icon) Careful, these experiments may bite

    WARNING These experimental features may change, break, or disappear at any time. We make absolutely no guarantees about what may happen if you turn one of these experiments on, and your browser may even spontaneously combust. Jokes aside, your browser may delete all your data, or your security and privacy could be compromised in unexpected ways. Any experiments you enable will be enabled for all users of this browser. Please proceed with caution. Interested in cool new Vivaldi features? Try our beta channel at vivaldi.com/beta.

    Enable Offline Auto-Reload Mode Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, Android
    Pages that fail to load while the browser is offline will be auto-reloaded when the browser is online again. #enable-offline-auto-reload [ [b]Disabled ]

    Only Auto-Reload Visible Tabs Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, Android
    Pages that fail to load while the browser is offline will only be auto-reloaded if their tab is visible.
    #enable-offline-auto-reload-visible-only [ [b]Enabled ]

    The flags work fine for Opera 32, it loads up over one-hundred Tabs at startup but doesn't actually retrieve their content until you select or refresh them. I have not tried to open that many Tabs with Vivaldi but it mostly works with fewer Tabs.

    Have fun! B)



  • Opera itself has a powerful tab managing without need of any change.

    The only problem that i have with opera and i could not solve is that opera does not save pdf save options and i have to change it manually every time.


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