Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux


  • - Ambassador -

    On my laptop Windows 10, cold boot and connected to the network ~ 22s. Linux isn't faster



  • @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    On my laptop Windows 10, cold boot and connected to the network ~ 22s. Linux isn't faster

    Out of curiosity... Do you have "fast boot" disabled? If not then it's not a cold boot - by default Microsoft let's Windows 10 "shut down" by logging the user out and hibernating.


  • - Ambassador -

    @mossman, no, nothing to hibernate, I turn off the Laptop when I do not use it. Cold start.
    Although I have to add that on the one hand I use an SSD and on the other hand I have also left only the necessary Windows services.



  • On my workstation Windows is the fastest of 5 OSes that I boot on the machine. I don't have the numbers available as I haven't timed it in well over a year, maybe 2 now. Between the 2 OSes I regularly boot, Windows (vs Arch Linux) is significantly faster that it's noticeable without a stopwatch. I consider the stopwatch to start after the OS is chosen in the boot loader, refund in my case. That's the only fair way to compare. Not only is everything before that common to all systems, it wouldn't be an accurate measurement trying to time choosing a non-default OS with the boot loader timeout. So when I did time it, I started the timer when I selected the OS to boot. Total time from power on to network connected isn't what mattered in that test, just the difference between systems.



  • @bonetone I guess faster boot time is needed for having to restart the PC 3 times a day every day for any (minor) update in Windows 😆

    P.S. Did you add to the fair comparison the time that is needed to re-open all the opened programs and their files that the restart has shut down? 😛


  • - Ambassador -

    @npro , Windows 10 updates (fully programmable so as not to interfere with working hours), have greatly improved over previous versions. They are not more invasive than I know about Kubuntu, some require a reboot and some do not, you can also leave the reboot for when more It suits.reopening closed programs, at least on my laptop, is instantaneous with a click, in some 2-3 s, so there are no problems either.
    At least in the performance aspect I don't see much difference between Linux (like Mint or Kubuntu) and a well-configured Windows 10. It may be that a light or basic distro is somewhat faster.



  • @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @npro , Windows 10 updates (fully programmable so as not to interfere with working hours), have greatly improved over previous versions.

    I don't think so, the other day there was a security update where I had to restart the PC, only to find 1 hour later another "optional" update which in fact was so "optional" that it contained dozens of fixes and on top of that it was so "minor" that it required yet another restart, despite not being a security one.
    Also about what you are saying about interfering with working hours, with so many severe security issues and holes that need to be patched every other day with Windows, if I get a notification at 9am I won't wait until 10pm to install that update nor do I want my files that I'm working on or I am letting those open for the next day to close. So to me the M$ OS is just a 💩 .



  • @Catweazle so my point is... If you select "shut down" on any Windows 10 machine by default it is actually hibernating!

    Edit: and that includes shutting down by pressing the power button.



  • @mossman I know this because I had to deactivate fast boot when I encrypted my hard drive - it couldn't boot since... The encryption key wasn't available to load the memory from the hibernation file.

    There's a reason it used to need a restart when updating - that's the only actual "boot" a typical user ever sees.

    Ever wondered why Windows 10 takes a long time to shut down after logging you out? Because it's saving the entire memory to disk.

    On my encrypted PC it now takes longer to boot but only seconds to shut down...


  • - Ambassador -

    @npro said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @npro , Windows 10 updates (fully programmable so as not to interfere with working hours), have greatly improved over previous versions.

    I don't think so, the other day there was a security update where I had to restart the PC, only to find 1 hour later another "optional" update which in fact was so "optional" that it contained dozens of fixes and on top of that it was so "minor" that it required yet another restart, despite not being a security one.
    Also about what you are saying about interfering with working hours, with so many severe security issues and holes that need to be patched every other day with Windows, if I get a notification at 9am I won't wait until 10pm to install that update nor do I want my files that I'm working on or I am letting those open for the next day to close. So to me the M$ OS is just a 💩 .

    Check out the settings and updates, there you can configure every aspect of them, their frequency and the time allowed for it.
    I also had this system update, which took about 4-5 minutes, the longest to date. Normally it notifies me if there is an update ready to install, what between installing and restart with much need 1 -1.5 min.



  • @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @npro said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @npro , Windows 10 updates (fully programmable so as not to interfere with working hours), have greatly improved over previous versions.

    I don't think so, the other day there was a security update where I had to restart the PC, only to find 1 hour later another "optional" update which in fact was so "optional" that it contained dozens of fixes and on top of that it was so "minor" that it required yet another restart, despite not being a security one.
    Also about what you are saying about interfering with working hours, with so many severe security issues and holes that need to be patched every other day with Windows, if I get a notification at 9am I won't wait until 10pm to install that update nor do I want my files that I'm working on or I am letting those open for the next day to close. So to me the M$ OS is just a 💩 .

    Check out the settings and updates, there you can configure every aspect of them, their frequency and the time allowed for it.

    There hasn't been anything in the settings that can comply with what I wrote above, so I stand to it, and besides I'm already in the process of removing W10 as well from the laptop. Let's not drag this discussion to a Windows defending helpline, it's pointless. /added: (at least to me, as I said before)


  • - Ambassador -

    @npro , I do not want to defend one OS or another, I just like to clarify that neither Windows 10 is so disastrous and neither is Linux nor the panacea and superior. Windows allows you to configure any aspect, although sometimes you have to look for the options by diving through many submenus and that there is not much documentation about some advanced settings. It is there where it fails, not elsewhere, although it can be alleviated, creating a God Mode.



  • @Catweazle Well that's not quite true that Windows allows you to configure any aspect, after you reach some point you are facing a wall and you can only hope for a re-format or running some useless fix-it.exe from Microsoft, contrary to Linux where the only stopping factor of fixing something is one's lack of knowledge that can be easily overcome if you have patience, which has the additional benefit of making you learn something in the process.
    Having to restart the PC for any update in Windows is another proof that not everything can be configured as you advertise/claim, it's a deficit of its NT architecture, and choosing when to restart is not the same as no restart at all, no matter how many times you want to dodge it.
    Further Windows has become a serious privacy offender and guess what, it can't be 100% configured too and since it is based on a money earning model its not meant to be 100% transparent by default.

    We can agree that superiority or not is not the subject, nor OS wars that lead to nowhere, one should use whatever OS suits his needs and in my case for the aforementioned reasons and many others its definitely not Windows.


  • - Ambassador -

    @npro , This is the point that I mentioned on another occasion, the best OS is the one that best suits the needs of each one.
    It is true that Window, especially 10, is bloatware by default and reuses some basic knowledge to make it a very valid and also private OS, which is possible, although it is necessary do some things from the command line. Of this if there is extensive documentation on the network. The difference is this, that Windows requires prior work before using it, which in Linux is obviously not necessary, but where instead there are other problems. No OS is 100% perfect



  • If you mainly use your computer for internet or browsing and sending and receiving email. So it is excellent option to replace windows 7 with Linux.



  • @OlgaA Hi I am in process of upgrading Windows 7 Pro to Windows 10, apparently still free, and saw your post. Not read yet. But seems to me will not be straightforward. Are there any downsides to Linux, as I must have minimisation of downsides. I have not had for the last 4 years.

    Vivaldi is beautiful, so many options, but does take time to become fully aware of them. I truly love it and can't help but think where I would be if I had started with it much earlier!

    A radical suggestion from me would be some descriptions of how people are using Vivaldi from a non-technical viewpoint.
    For instance, by accident from #Barebones discovered the power of the SpeedDiaooer, which I had avoided using as I thought would not be so good, but #Barbones made it clear for me, that you can have folders and sub-folders in this part without negative consequences!

    This will truly revolutionise my use of Vivaldi and make it even better and would help the whole world.

    Vivaldi is the global liberation tool par excellence! Makes browsing a pleasure.

    Only weakness for me at the moment is, if you have a long list of Adhoc bookmarks, is what is the optimal way of reorganising them??
    I am sure there are generous users willing to share their best practice with a slightly dumb 75 year old Englishman living in Sweden trying to make the world a bit better and to some extent succeeding.
    A wonderful community of helpful souls.
    My weblink currently being restructured, any input is not unwelcome, and I will do a post on Vivaldi in the near future, is
    https://gobaug.org


  • - Ambassador -

    @azajali43 said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    If you mainly use your computer for internet or browsing and sending and receiving email. So it is excellent option to replace windows 7 with Linux.

    May I suggest Linux Mint. Mint has the look and feel of Win7.
    If you install Mint this should prove to be helpful.



  • Briolliant, thank you so much. Will scrutinise. And rgen deide.

    What a fabulous community this is.

    Brian



  • @Catweazle Thank you so much. Considering the Linux Mint option also, but not sre which way to go. Do not want too many hassles. What is your take on this? I am nor a geek, just a long suffering extremely derermined 75 year old man!


  • - Ambassador -

    @britur , Linux distros (for example Mint or Kubuntu) can be recorded and executed from a pendrive (or CD). So you can see how they are, without having to change anything in the OS you use, to see their functions and which one you like best.
    The other option would be to install them in another partition along with Windows in dual boot (when turning on the PC a menu appears, asking what OS you want to work with). This will give you the advantages of both OS.
    This can also be done from the same pendrive of the distro. The installation is automatic with the options you choose. You get the options to install it as a single OS or install it together with Windows. In the latter case it will create the partition automatically and the boot menu. You don't have to do anything but choose the options (language, apps, etc.).


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