Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux


  • Community Manager

    In less than two months, Windows 7 will enter end of life. Here’s why you might want to replace it with Linux.

    Click here to see the full blog post



  • Long time Windows and Mac user here, and though I love using macOS I just recently dropped it for Linux since I've really come to hate their after sales support especially their repair policies.
    Dropping Mac and switching to Windows/Linux is the best decision I've made this year. πŸ™‚
    I usually main Windows but now I keep using my Manjaro KDE installation more.


  • Ambassador

    Good article, but I have some observations about it.
    If it is a very old PC, the best option is undoubtedly to move to Linux, although this of a Windows10 so hungry for resources is quite debatable (there are small netbooks with Windows10).
    Although they say that Windows7 stops receiving support in January next year, given that there are still many users with this OS, it is quite possible that this period will be extended considerably, as also happened with XP, which exceeded several years the Replacement date
    Linux is always an alternative with permanent availability, although it must be added that on a PC so old where Windows10 will not work, the most complex distros (Kubuntu, Mint, Ubuntu in its latest versions) will not do so either satisfactorily and there are that to have to use distros adapted to humble equipment (Lubuntu, Puppy Linux, DS Linux, etc. with all the limitations that they have).
    Therefore do not panic and wait quietly to January to see what happens, there is always time to switch to Linux, switch to Windows 10, or have Windows and Linux in dual boot.
    More serious would be, when Vivaldi lets support 32-bit computers



  • Thanks for the article πŸ‘
    I've got an "oldish" Win7 laptop stowed away I've been thinking of installing Linux on. It's a good machine but very heavy compared to the slim lightweight ones from the last years, and the battery is almost dead so it'll need replacing. I think it would make an excellent Linux machine. But then again I rarely have a need for travelling with a computer anyway, and a good desktop/tower beats a laptop for computing any day πŸ˜‰

    The only thing which is limited on Linux is gaming, but it's gotten better the last years, and I'd not use that machine for any heavy games anyway.



  • While I agree with the general theme of the article, there are still ways to improve security on Linux.

    Right now, Vivaldi is still using X11 and does not make use of the client isolation with Wayland. Every X11 application on your desktop that runs as the same user can access every mouse and keyboard input. To make this more clear: Any X11 application (e.g. Steam games) that runs in parallel to Vivaldi can access your typed passwords.

    The Wayland backend has been merged to the upstream Chromium project: https://chromium.googlesource.com/chromium/src.git/+/master/docs/ozone_overview.md#wayland



  • @catweazle said:

    More serious would be, when Vivaldi lets support 32-bit computers

    Just curious how old a computer must be not to support a 64 bit Operating System. Which was the last processor in the mass consumer market that didn't support a 64bit OS's? 486? 68040?


  • Moderator

    @QuHno I know someone who has a laptop built for windows Vista that is 32 bit. So it is old, but not ancient.



  • Problem with switching to Linux is that most the desktop variants barely even match Windows XP in terms of features, explorer shell extensions, and just plain basic user experience that doesn't feel like it was built by complete amateurs who can't even get the most basics of a desktop functionality working right. I've tried some linux distro that don't even support diagonal drag resizing the corners of a window frame.. and some that have like 1pixel border that you have to have the cursor on precisely to even resize.. really just moronic, I guess that's what you get from free software

    Yet Windows XP was released over a decade ago, they all they had to do replicate it.

    I'd stick with Windows7 and just use a good firewall, block all unneeded background MS service crap (those are your biggest vulnerabilities including spy crapware updates from MS)..

    Anyway for the average user a linux desktop pretty does everything they'd want, more software is crossplatform, so yeah Linux is fine just not for a power user... it has rubbish security and probably riddled with telementry crap especially ubuntu just the same as Windows albeit without a fraction of the software ecosystem to fix and improve any of its issues. Anyone even know of a good proactive Firewall for linux that isn't complete rubbish.. you find a something as good as Netlimiter.com ? no you won't I've checked.



  • @Koolio said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    feel like it was built by complete amateurs who can't even get the most basics of a desktop functionality working right

    fully quoting that, +1 πŸ™‚



  • It would not be a Linux article if there wasn't some guy arguing about "distro recommendations". Now if I assume your components are not older than 6 years:

    If you never touched Linux before and you want to make your switch as painless as possible, I would go with Linux Mint. A great community geared towards newcomers (in other words a lot of people helping out in forums). Most importantly they are focused on ONE default desktop environment (Cinnamon). It is specifically geared towards Windows refugees. A great starting point for office work, even gaming. I used it myself for a year, really the only reason I left is that I was missing some software, that was only available in AUR...

    Next up, Manjaro. It holds your hands a bit less, but you probably learn a bit more and most importantly you get access to AUR, currently the widest application repository. Plus you can use virtually any desktop environment. Community is slightly more annoyed by noob questions, but if you are polite, you will never have an issue on their forums.

    If your computer is really old garbage, I would pick MX Linux. The community is also great, but it feels they are against anything that is not FOSS. Like you know, Vivaldi. I recommend MX Linux for people I know for sure just need to read and email or play cards. I am talking your senior citizen friend you visit once in a year, lives far and you need this thing to be stable. The main advantage here is, it just works, almost impossible to break and it will run smoothly even if your computer is hardly handling Windows 7.

    Lastly, if you want to taste the future of Linux and cry from utter desperation, try installing NixOS. I used the word "try" intentionally because the very act of getting this system installed is a trial of character. I mean, you really should not start here, but I wanted to include this option just in case your life is going wonderfully and you want to hate yourself; only to overcome the issues and eventually become demi-god ruling both desktop and servers in the almost unbreakable Linux environment.

    My 2c.


  • Ambassador

    In the past I used Kubuntu sometimes, with which I had very good experiences. People who have never used Linux can be reassured, stating that the handling and UI of current distros is not so different from Windows and does not offer many problems of getting used by beginners too.



  • @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    Linux is always an alternative with permanent availability

    Unfortunately, this is not as true as I had hoped... right after installing Lubuntu on my old XP netbook a few months ago, they announced future releases are 64-bit only. So I will have to switch again to something else.

    I have the following list to test:

    • Linux Lite
    • Damn Small Linux
    • Xubuntu
    • Puppy
    • Bhodi (legacy)
    • Peppermint
    • antiX

    I'll be looking for 32-bit + encrypted disk + swap file (Lubuntu didn't install with this, surprisingly, which meant that it would sometimes run out of memory and lock up when opening multiple pages in Vivaldi).



  • @QuHno said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @catweazle said:

    More serious would be, when Vivaldi lets support 32-bit computers

    Just curious how old a computer must be not to support a 64 bit Operating System. Which was the last processor in the mass consumer market that didn't support a 64bit OS's? 486? 68040?

    Ha ha! As I just said above, a netbook with Atom from 2010 won't - so less than ten years.


  • Ambassador

    @mossman said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    @Catweazle said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    Linux is always an alternative with permanent availability, although it must be added that on a PC so old where Windows10 will not work, the most complex distros (Kubuntu, Mint, Ubuntu in its latest versions) will not do so either satisfactorily and there are that to have to use distros adapted to humble equipment (Lubuntu, Puppy Linux, DS Linux, etc. with all the limitations that they have).

    Unfortunately, this is not as true as I had hoped... right after installing Lubuntu on my old XP netbook a few months ago, they announced future releases are 64-bit only. So I will have to switch again to something else.

    I have the following list to test:

    • Linux Lite
    • Damn Small Linux
    • Xubuntu?
    • Puppy?
    • Bhodi (legacy)
    • Peppermint
    • antiX

    I'll be looking for 32-bit + encrypted disk + swap file (Lubuntu didn't install with this, surprisingly, which meant that it would sometimes run out of memory and lock up when opening multiple pages in Vivaldi).

    I mentioned Lubunto for being a reduced distro, but if, in the future the problem of old PCs is going to be less system capacity, distros for few capacities will be, but the availability of soft 32bit Just as it happened in the past with those of 8 and 16 bits.



  • @Koolio said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    Problem with switching to Linux is that most the desktop variants barely even match Windows XP in terms of features, explorer shell extensions, and just plain basic user experience that doesn't feel like it was built by complete amateurs who can't even get the most basics of a desktop functionality working right.

    Well that really really depends.

    At work they recently upgraded a system to run on virtual desktops running RHEL. Click to open that and your Win10 dual-monitor setup is suddenly a very slick looking dual-monitor Red Hat running the software in question. Looks better than Windows IMHO.



  • I've tried some linux distro that don't even support diagonal drag resizing the corners of a window frame.. and some that have like 1pixel border that you have to have the cursor on precisely to even resize.. really just moronic, I guess that's what you get from free software

    Don't blame the OS for the applications that you are running on it. Blame the author that wrote and designed the application. I can write an application for you without borders at all that doesn't allow you to do anything with it other than crashing.



  • There is no Total Commander for Linux 😞



  • @veljanovski it's called midnight commander


  • Ambassador

    @veljanovski said in Why you should replace Windows 7 with Linux:

    There is no Total Commander for Linux 😞

    A page that should be in any bookmark
    https://alternativeto.net/


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