Flashback


  • Community Manager

    From “Flash is dead” to “Flash will never die” our users are split over the virtues of the Flash technology. Even though it’s being phased out, we decided to make it an option – while it’s still here.

    Click here to see the full blog post



  • @OlgaA Some older content on the BBC website uses Flash, but it is a site that I trust.


  • Moderator

    The national weather website uses Flash to animate sequential weather radar images, showing a "loop" that depicts storm and cloud movement. I frequently need that. In ranching, we often have to know where it's going to rain when, and when it will stop - and which direction the storm is moving.


  • Moderator

    Flash itself will never die - for archival purposes. See http://bluemaxima.org/flashpoint/

    But Flash in the browser needs to go - sooner preferably.



  • real time streaming is easy with Flash and harder with newer technologies. Because of that all of the CCTV cameras and recording systems I have tested relies on flash on their web interfaces. This is an issue for me, because the cameras are all fine, nice quality. Replacing them is a waste of money and waste of electronics.

    And it will be hard to find newer ones (especially cheap ones from China) without Flash requirement untill Flash is really removed from the minds of people (and this will take another 10 years I think)



  • A lot of the cultural history of the pre-Youtube web is still contained in Flash. Some of it has been converted to video, but is often grainy or badly encoded conversions from Flash, and with no interactivity obviously.

    Many have fond memories of the first Flash animation they saw more than 20 years ago, or the first Flash games they played as teens or young adults. If these things disappear completely it will be a loss to the internet, no matter how much the "kill flash" crowd talk about how it's time to let it die.

    Thankfully projects like Bluemaxima's Flashpoint are doing a great job at preserving a lot of this content for posterity, but there's a lot out there on various sites. Just sites like GeoCities JP had a massive amount of content, mostly unknown to anyone outside Japan, and most of it gone for ever when it closed down in March this year.

    And yes, one could argue that a lot of it was complete crap, silly games and animation for teens to giggle at. But there was also a lot of really good Flash content on the early web.

    One of the first great Flash animations I saw was "Different Web One" by French/Danish demo scene group Melon Dezign. It blew my mind when I first saw it in '99, to see that art like that could exist on the boring mostly text-based web at the time. It's still available on their site, along with some brilliant Beatles animations.

    And related to the title of this thread: Having first seen it, who can forget the mind-altering madness of Flashback by Danny Gomez 🤪



  • I still play old Flash based games. These are no hope to rebuild based HTML5 (because publisher of games were gone away).



  • @pathduck said:

    And yes, one could argue that a lot of it was complete crap, silly games and animation for teens to giggle at. But there was also a lot of really good Flash content on the early web.

    The same is true for the "modern HTML5" web. (SCNR)



  • Some ISPs still use Flash Player for live streaming of tv online. I have also come across sites that are 100% Flash Player content.


  • Vivaldi Team

    I'll just leave this, for people who need Flash for Linux



  • @LonM Certainly for those using WaybackMachine.



  • I uninstalled Flash completely yesterday. I only needed it for one site anymore, and I can live without it, so there was no point in keeping it.



  • When I configure a Vivaldi install, I open chrome://settings and configure it to always block Flash. It's a major security risk, and I refuse to allow it to even be used on a per-site basis.

    The same goes for Java. If I install it at all, I disable the browser plugin in Java's settings due to the fact that it's also a major security risk.



  • @GT500 said in Flashback:

    When I configure a Vivaldi install, I open chrome://settings and configure it to always block Flash. It's a major security risk, and I refuse to allow it to even be used on a per-site basis.

    The same goes for Java. If I install it at all, I disable the browser plugin in Java's settings due to the fact that it's also a major security risk.

    Same here, I always block Flash and especially Java must be over 10 yrs no Java, never use it...glad Flash is ending



  • Coincidentally I came here to add JRE (java runtime machine). After reading 95% of topic and ready to reply, @GT500, which nick sounds familiar, was already did.



  • flashplayer is disable by default. The slider is greyed out

    Block sites from running Flash (recommended)

    If anyone decides to allow, the slider is blue

    Ask first

    Also, allow/deny per site



  • Flash may still be used by news sites in smaller countries...

    ...and big countries like China. A lot of sites uses Flash, and Flash has a Chinese partner that owns a Flash games site and its distribution. You can't get rid of Flash like get rid of Windows XP.



  • I'm sure that people have had lots of fun from Flash-based games. However, Flash also shows up in many very solemn uses in business. For example, a major service vendor in the USA which handles employee payroll for many other companies was (when I last checked) using Flash-based technology for employees to access their pay and tax-deduction records.


  • Vivaldi Ambassador

    I ditched flash about 10 years ago and have not missed it.
    There are just too many security holes... and the internet is supposed to a place of progress. In my opinion we should not be regressing to suit corporations who are too cheap or lazy to embrace newer and more secure technologies.
    I, personally, have no use for flash
    For those projects developed in-house, and used only in-house, I suppose(?) there is less harm.

    Thankfully Vivaldi has flash is disabled by default.



  • For average Joe like myself, Flash is still something you encounter here and there and if it doesn't work it's frustrating. Every so often (3 times a year?) I run into flash problems with Vivaldi - usually after an update. Then, nothing I do in Vivaldi works (enabling flash in settings, allowing it in the site specific settings, downloading the latest flash version etc.). I just see the puzzle icon. Right-click 'run plugin' didn't do anything).

    Turns out I needed to update Chrome on my computer to make it work in Vivaldi. (!)

    There is not enough info on the help sites google finds (https://help.vivaldi.com/article/enabling-flash/ and https://help.vivaldi.com/article/enabling-flash/). I can see some people getting frustrated with Vivaldi because of that. I suggest to add a vivaldi specific troubleshooting guide


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