Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings



  • @LonM said in Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings:

    In the future, we may consider switching to something else, for example, Cloudflare’s 1.1.1.1.

    Good idea!

    I would second this as well as the other responses to this post (regarding Cloudflare not necessarily being the best choice). I'd love to keep G out of the browser as much as possible (but at the same time don't want to use services provided by someone who could be just as bad or worse).

    Perhaps the option to use a custom DNS instead would be the way forward? Just have a couple of text input fields where you can put IP addresses in, rather than hardcoding 8.8.8.8 or 1.1.1.1 into the browser?

    Alternatively, what about using OpenNIC? I know they discourage people from using their anycast servers, but if this is a backup system in the browser, not the user's primary DNS, I don't see why the occasional use of OpenNIC's anycast servers would be a problem. The added bonus of this would be that Vivaldi users would also always be able to get to OpenNIC-only domains, without messing with their system DNS settings.



  • @Pathduck said in Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings:

    Thing is, even if you turn off those settings in Vivaldi, Chromium will still "phone home" on start to the Google-owned domain 1e100.net. Starting Vivaldi and looking at the network connections, it has about six different connections to this domain even with the Google services turned off.

    Maybe if the user directly turns off the flags in Chrome it will stop doing this, but regular users can't be expected to know this.

    I think Vivaldi should make sure that if these settings are turned off, Vivaldi will not make calls to Google's domains at all. Unless it's for things like getting updated certificate lists from the global CAs, but these should/could also in the future be provided by Vivaldi.

    I still have some of them turned on because I don't mind them, but the option to completely keep Google out of the browser should be there.

    I second this. I've been really lax in monitoring my systems' network connections, so should have noticed this by now - but yes, it should be possible to prevent the browser trying to automatically connect to G unless you explicitly visit one of their web sites. Hopefully it's just an innocent action such as refreshing the safebrowsing list, so it's ready just in case the user switches safebrowsing back on... but where G is involved, a lot of users may be a little less trusting and a little more suspicious.



  • @jamesbeardmore said in Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings:

    I'd love to keep G out of the browser as much as possible (but at the same time don't want to use services provided by someone who could be just as bad or worse).

    Exactly. Or as Danny would've said it:

    "Why trust one drug rather than the other. That's politics innit."

    https://i.imgur.com/NfiNivY.jpg



  • When I downloaded Vivaldi without an account I began to get marketing emails. Privacy? Right.... Vivaldi digs as deep into your system as any other browser. As a design professional, and an original beta tester for Opera on the Mac back in the late 90s, I am not green around the gills. I don't buy the privacy crap any browser espouses.


  • Moderator

    @gajk Interesting. Wonder how you managed that. I have never received a marketing email from Vivaldi in five years.



  • @Ayespy I was thinking that he must have done a Google search for Vivaldi to find the download, or followed a link on a dodgy site that tracks users’ behaviour. If so, that would be rather ironic.


  • Moderator

    @gajk said in Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings:

    When I downloaded Vivaldi without an account I began to get marketing emails.

    A download of Vivaldi at vivaldi.com does not result in getting mails from other companies or spammers.



  • @gajk said in Vivaldi’s powerful privacy settings:

    When I downloaded Vivaldi without an account I began to get marketing emails. Privacy? Right.... Vivaldi digs as deep into your system as any other browser. As a design professional, and an original beta tester for Opera on the Mac back in the late 90s, I am not green around the gills. I don't buy the privacy crap any browser espouses.

    A browser shouldn't dig anywhere into your system at all. Its job is simply to render HTML and display it to you. That's why it's so easy to switch browsers, run multiple browsers concurrently etc. Contrast that with antivirus software, disk defragmenting software, etc.

    I've never had any marketing emails regarding Vivaldi. In fact, when I created a Vivaldi email account, I never had any marketing mail of any kind to it, until somebody I once emailed got their iThings hacked.

    If you started receiving marketing messages, it's probably because you used a mainstream search engine, or talked about switching browsers on a mainstream social media site/forum, or one of your friends got a virus.

    If you are concerned about privacy in your browser, you may also want to investigate compiling GNU Icecat for yourself, or using Firefox while adding the various about:config tweaks proposed at privacytools.io and restoreprivacy.com . But rest assured, Vivaldi is at present one of the less-offensive browsers out there.


  • Moderator

    @gajk If you signed up for vivaldi sync, you may have ticked to join the mailing lists.

    You can unsubscribe from them easily using a link at the bottom of them.

    You can also unsubscribe from them here: https://vivaldi.com/newsletter/unsubscribe

    These mailing lists are informational (letting you know about browser updates etc.) and run by Vivaldi, and your details are never shared with 3rd parties.


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