Windows 10 questions



  • 1. How will update work? Will it be like replacing windows with Linux ... a complete erase and re-write? Or will it simply take win 8 and modify it like a windows service pack (keeping some parts)? 2. So if you have a win 7 or 8 computer with an entrenched rootkit or some nasty, will upgrading to 10 remove this problem, or will the rootkit etc persist? 3. Do you believe that windows will only offer 10 for free for 1 year. Or will they extend it later? 4. Difference between 10 home and 10 pro? 5. Will microsoft office 2007 work on 10? Ya, I know, wishful thinking ... 6. Will personal files etc be saved when you update to 10? 7. Will programs you have installed remain after update to 10. ex. ccleaner or some other program that will be 10 compliant. Or will you have to reinstall them? If you have any questions, ask away.



  • Most of your questions are answered here

    http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/windows-10-faq



  • sorry bud, but that doesn't look like it answers any of my questions. it tells you its free, how to reserve, etc … its just peddling the product. is it adding/modifying my existing windows or is it reformatting and clean installing (which was my Linux analogy verses a service upgrade)? This will have relevance on the rootkit question.

    plus, win 7 pro had the feature to run a greater selection of xp software. i was wondering if 10 pro will also do this (which will allow me to keep my ms office 2007 if i go for pro)?


  • Moderator

    As nearly as I can tell, everything that runs on Win 8.1 (including Office 2007) should run in Win 10. So far nothing that I run in Win 8 has had any prob installing on Win 10.

    10 is being offered free as an upgrade to everyone on Win7 on up, and, when I installed Win 10 over the top of my Win 7 Ultimate, everything I already had installed on the machine came thru unscathed and working. Since it CAN be done, obviously, and since it's being offered to everyone under the sun as a free upgrade during at least the first year of release, I'ma say that it is going to replace your Win7 or Win8.1 and, insofar as possible, is going to preserve the workability of everything you have on board. You will not need a new license number (your old 7 or 8 license will suffice) and it's supposed to receive updates "for life."

    So I'm sure NO ONE (including Microsoft) can tell you right now what all software is going to conflict with the new OS (there's a compatibility wizard you can run that tells you at the time you first want to install, what is on your machine that Win10 might break - on my machine it said "nothing."), but indications are it will be backward-compatible with quite a number of things.

    (I had some old Win 98 software installed on my and my wife's machines under Win7 - had to jump thru some hoops to do it but it worked - and when I updated to Win8, THAT software was broken on my machine. I had other stuff under XP that Win7 broke. So 'ya never know.)



  • thanx. hmmm, i wonder if malware or a rootkit would transfer over unscathed? or corrupted files from windows 7 that didn't need upgrading for 10?

    i don't suppose you had a paid ms office program did you? since ms is moving to a monthly `rental' of its office program, i suspected that ms office 2007 wouldn't run on 10 (that they'd force me to upgrade it).


  • Moderator

    My wife and daughter both have Office 2010 but I don't. I refuse to pay the extortion MS wants for Office, so I use other compatible software. I have Win10, but they only have Win 7 and 8 - so, at this point, from here, it's just speculation. I would be killer-shocked if upgrading to 10 killed licensed MS software that runs on 8. But, hey - the compatibility wizard means you will get to find out before pushing the button to install 10.



  • @biggerabalone:

    plus, win 7 pro had the feature to run a greater selection of xp software. i was wondering if 10 pro will also do this (which will allow me to keep my ms office 2007 if i go for pro)?

    W10 is just "another windows release" it runs most of the old 16 and 32 bits applications if you are going to install the 32bit version, and most of the 32 and 64 bit applications if you use the 64 bit apps.

    Exactly like any other previous windows.

    The notable difference with win 7 is that they removed the WMC since the build 10147 (the latest build "pubblicly available" ATM), and the missing VirtualPC/XP mode feature (the latter since win 8.0), replaced by Hyperv which isn't exactly overlapping.

    If you never used the above features (or if you don't know what they are) have little to worry about the win 10 upgrade.

    At least technically speaking.



  • ms doesn't have the best track record sometimes - at least with me. i used to have office starter, it came with my computer. it worked fantastic and i loved it. one day an update came that erased it and moved it to the cloud. and the cloud version blew. i was forced to look for other alternatives, but none have a grammatical checker that works as well as office (i mean the freeware ones - i never tried corel etc). since office is moving to a monthly subscription, i am leery as to whether my office 2007 (or 2010) will work in the 10 home version. i suspect the pro will allow it (if you pay to upgrade to pro). it will be interesting to see how they play this out. there are many excellent freeware office programs competing with ms office, so hopefully they don't antagonize their customer base too much.



  • did any of you guys that are trying out 10 notice any performance differences? from what i've read so far, the differences are negligible, with a slight advantage to 10.


  • Moderator

    Yes, performance boost with 10, NOT negligible. Quite noticeable, especially at startup and shutdown. Also, unaccountably, seems to improve battery life on laptop.

    Can't say if I would really notice it on my desktop, which has a lot of resources and therefore benefits less from resource economy, but noticeable on my oldest, weakest laptop for sure.



  • ya, i figured it would start quicker. win 8 started that partial shut down thing where its kinda like going into hibernation instead of a full shut down. i have a laptop that i very occasionally use, and i guess my battery will now be dead with win 10 when i need it.

    since the kernel or whatever doesn't fully de-energize … that raises another question. on my desk top, i sometimes like to turn off the power bar when i shut down the computer (ex. if there is a lightning storm, or going on vacation). this would forcibly de-energize the kernel. could this cause damage to the kernel????



  • You can enable or disable the Hybrid Shutdown, w/o any problem if you have compatibility problems.

    And no, Hybrid Shutdown has nothing to do with the battery life.

    A machine turned off is turned off, no matter if the HS is in use.



  • that doesn't seem correct. here's a quote describing the operation:

    "The goal of Fast Boot is pretty obvious from its name - Windows 8 boots up faster than previous versions of the operating system ever did. To accomplish this feat, Windows 8 doesn't totally shut down when you click the Shut down command. Instead it only partially shuts down and partially hibernates. This is the Hybrid Shutdown part of the equation. Then, when you turn on your computer, Windows 8 starts very quickly because it only has to partially boot up and partially wake up. This is the Fast Boot part of the equation. Fast Boot also gets a boost from the efficiency of today's hardware; namely UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface) and multi-core processors".

    http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/windows-and-office/how-windows-8-hybrid-shutdown-fast-boot-feature-works/

    if you are not plugged into the wall and on battery, this will drain your battery faster. my father in law has win 8 and his (from completely charged) is dead (without use) around the 2 month mark or so (perhaps faster). my windows 7 laptop (with a battery half the size of his, and mine is 3 years older) has never had any battery drain that i noticed even 5 months later (without using it and not being plugged in).

    unless you're saying win 10 does it completely different than win 8?

    but its good to know i can turn that feature off.



  • does win 10 give access to appdata like in 7 (users/appdata/roaming)?

    'cuz i have minecraft installed, and in order to mod it out, you have to fiddle with your data. do you still have this level of access in win 10?



  • @biggerabalone:

    that doesn't seem correct.

    What's wrong in my description?

    Hibernation is not suspension.

    A fully hibernated computer is a fully powered off one, hence a partly hibernated computer is still fully shut down.

    What changes from the normal boot is that part of the needed data are loaded sequentially from a big file, instead of loading them per file, as happens in the classic boot process.


  • Moderator

    @biggerabalone:

    does win 10 give access to appdata like in 7 (users/appdata/roaming)?

    'cuz i have minecraft installed, and in order to mod it out, you have to fiddle with your data. do you still have this level of access in win 10?

    File structure of Win10 is nearly identical to Win7 and 8. Access to files is the same. UI is much more similar to 7 than 8. On my 8.1, I had to install Classic Shell to get away from the abominable Metro interface and back to the Win7 experience. On 10, it's looking like that will be unnecessary for most people. The transition from 7 to 10 will be pretty much seamless.



  • you said a "Hybrid Shutdown has nothing to do with the battery life", not "a fully hibernated computer". you're changing what we're talking about. i agree that hibernation doesn't affect battery life. but as i quoted techrepublic: hybrid shutdown "only partially shuts down and partially hibernates".



  • @Ayespy:

    File structure of Win10 is nearly identical to Win7 and 8. Access to files is the same. UI is much more similar to 7 than 8.

    good to know. i figured there shouldn't be much problems with minecraft considering microsoft owns it now, but they do occasionally do odd things.



  • @biggerabalone:

    you said a "Hybrid Shutdown has nothing to do with the battery life"

    I write it again if you prefer Hybrid Shutdown has nothing to do with the battery life.

    The sentence is right now as it was the first time i wrote it.

    Then you should decide if you want the right answer, or if you want someone that backs your prebuilt (and wrong) idea about the matter.



  • Is there any way to turn off Cortana & prevent the flow of information to Microsoft?


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Vivaldi Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.