Vivaldi just Opera Chrome part 2?



  • Hi! I hope the title says it all. I'm an old Opera lover from version 7 till version 12. After that Opera really got neutered and became Google Chrome, Opera Skin. My question is this. I just saw that Vivaldi is made by the great architect of original Opera and downloaded it. Is this another Chrome clone? I see chrome extensions are possible, so looks like yes but I really hope not. I miss my Opera so bad, but I do not want Google tracking me and data mining me like with new Opera and Chrome. I now use highly modified Opera-like Firefox. Sorry, english is not my first language.



  • I am sorry. I answered my own question. It appears under vivaldi://about that it is based on Google Chrome. Please, Mr Tetzchner, bring back Presto!

    Then I will return.


  • Moderator

    Presto belongs to Opera ASA. They are still using it in a number of products they sell. They are not going to give it up to a competitor. Further, the use of Presto as a base was one of the primary reasons why incompatibilities plagued Opera for most of its existence. Developers don't write to Presto. Period. They also will never write to any other minority 3rd-party engine.

    Jon and his crew carefully studied their options as to what to do for a browser engine before this project began. They decided against writing their own (an impossibly huge task), against using Gecko, against using QT, and in favor of using Blink. Sorry you will not be using Vivaldi (because, automatically, if Blink is used, there is tracking and data-mining by Google and other global conspiracies), but the die is cast.



  • Presto belongs to Opera, ASS sure. but Priesto or Pesto yummy could belong to Jon. ;-)

    New name, new product. Google is teh evils. Die is what it will never do. It just gobbles up everything. I am only saying this is what would bring me and many other Opera loyalists back. I support Jon's efforts, but they will find no home on my computer or my groups of friends' computers because of Blink (chromium).



  • You don't code much, do you…

    This has been answered countless times on this forum and on the Opera forums - Presto is dead. Period. No bringing it back, no re-writing it, no creating something new "presto-like". Why? Because it's just not cost effective in any way.

    Chromium is open sourced, which means Vivaldi can do a lot with that engine for free right away.

    Recreating Presto for the modern Web needs would take a shit-tonne of time, money and effort and would mean that it still needs to be updated and maintained - not only by the Vivaldi team, but also by the people behind Java, Flash and pretty much any website that uses more than clean HTML.

    If you want more answers on the topic of engine creation and Presto-necromancy, go ahead and search the forum for "Presto" because, really, everything was already explained time and time again.



  • @JWalker02:

    Presto belongs to Opera, ASS sure. but Priesto or Pesto yummy could belong to Jon. ;-)

    New name, new product. Google is teh evils. Die is what it will never do. It just gobbles up everything. I am only saying this is what would bring me and many other Opera loyalists back. I support Jon's efforts, but they will find no home on my computer or my groups of friends' computers because of Blink (chromium).

    Presto belongs to Opera ASA, meaning it's now their intellectual property, not Jon's. Cloning it, even in a modified form, under some other name would be a fast track to a lawsuit. But as others have said, Presto is essentially obsolete now in terms of site compatibility, secure-traffic protocols, and who-knows-what's-around-the-next-corner - and none of that is going away… ever.

    Try to realize that in the world of free web browsers, there is a definite limit to how much coding one can do before they deplete the company treasury. Using an "off-the-shelf," existing rendering engine cuts the development and maintenance cost by very large amounts... moreover, website compatibility will remain greatly enhanced if the chosen rendering engine has also been widely adopted by other browsers. This is what Blink brings to the table. The economics of it are compelling. And compelling economics will always come to dominate the marketplace when all of your competitor's products are "free". There are downsides to everything, and this is one of the downsides to the "free" software business model that has become almost universal on the web.

    I have no idea what you'd be willing to pay for a top-notch browser with its own new, proprietary rendering engine... but I'd bet it's a LOT less than what the browser would have to cost you on a recurring basis if it attempted to maintain comprehensive website compatibility as a minority rendering engine while keeping the company solvent. And in some cases, scripted patching (like Opera did with Presto) to try to achieve site compatibility might not even be possible, especially if a site actively 'sniffed' for 'minority' browsers. This was Presto Opera's very situation.

    I wish you well in your attempts to live a Google-free life on the web. But I also think you'll find your software choices severely and increasingly hemmed in as the days pass... at least, until the Google era fades (and all dinosaurs eventually DO die).



  • Does a product like Ghostery offer much assistance in hiding your tracks, preventing data mining? Or is this misleading?


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