Kill two birds with one stone



  • I believe that in an international forum, is nice to exchange curiosities, jokes, said, funny facts from different languages/people/countries. Some time ago I had a discussion about the well known said "[b][i]Kill two birds with one stone[/i][/b]" with an American and a German friend. Turned out that in Germany the sentence becomes "[i][b]kill two flies with one slap[/b][/i]" while In Italy we use "[i][b]catch two pigeons with one bean[/b][/i]" So just add the version from your country, but feel free to introduce other similar stories .



  • A friend of mine said a phrase similar to that "Cut the jackfruit and the rabbit is killed" I believe it is from a language in India.


  • Vivaldi Team

    Kill two hares with one shot - Russia



  • I used to make corrispondence with foreign people to improve my English and Norwegian language skills, I'm also learning Russian right now cause my gf is a native speaker.
    There are plenty of websites and social networks for that.
    One day while I was talking to a friend she was like : " Hey Nick guess what happened, I laughed so hard today " and I was like: " What happened? o.O "
    She told me a guy sent her a message saying he liked her, but when she answered she's married he quickly said he's not jealous.
    It's a pretty common "saying" here in Italy.

    "I'm married" - "Oh ok, I'm not jealous"

    It seems that it makes foreign people laugh a lot, they find it a "smart" joke



  • Kill two birds with one shot.

    I'm from Argentina and I think it doesn't vary among spanish-speaking countries.

    Another saying related with guns and birds we have in Argentina is «gastar pólvora en chimangos». As far as I know, this saying is not used in other spanish-speaking countries.

    It literally means "wasting powder on chimangos", wich meaning is wasting time or resources in something that won't be productive or useful.

    For example, if you're trying to debate with a fanatic/unreasoning/stubborn person, an argentinian would say to you "don't waste powder on chimangos".



  • Another phrase encountered frequently is: 'Knowing something like the back of one's hand'. It's expressing an in depth and detailed knowledge of the discussed topic. In German you express this level of familarity with something by saying: 'That I know like my vest pocket.' (Das kenne ich wie meine Westentasche.) Would be nice to know how this is formulated in other languages.



  • @RJules3:

    Another phrase encountered frequently is: 'Knowing something like the back of one's hand'. It's expressing an in depth and detailed knowledge of the discussed topic. In German you express this level of familarity with something by saying: 'That I know like my vest pocket.' (Das kenne ich wie meine Westentasche.) Would be nice to know how this is formulated in other languages.

    In Italian is used but it's the palm, not the back of the hand. ;)

    More frequently is used "knowing something like own pockets"



  • Thank you for enlightening me on the Italian way! :-)



  • You're welcome ;)

    Back to the topic I got the Brazilian version

    Matar dois coelhos com uma cajadada

    More or less, kill two rabbits with one beating…


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