The Internet should remain open and free


  • Community Manager

    The EU has moved one step closer to breaking the Internet as we know it. But all is not lost.

    Click here to see the full blog post


  • Moderator

    I have already contacted my MEP(s) prior to the previous vote and i shall do it again now.


  • Community Manager

    @lonm: That's great. MEP's themselves are pretty divided over this directive and they should know that people care.


  • Moderator

    @lonm Same did i.


  • Ambassador

    It is expected that our votes count more than the briefcases of the lobbies


  • Moderator

    I have now sent an email. You can find e-mail and physical addresses for your representatives here: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meps/en/search.html?

    Update:
    I've already received an automated reply from one of my MEPs basically telling me to stuff off because they fully support article 13. oh well.

    Update 2:
    One of my other MEPs has noted that as long as UK MEPs are able to act (time is limited) they will "continue to fight this". 👍



  • Copyright Protection =/= Net Neutrality.

    Internet will remain open and free, you only won't be able to share others work (which is fine by me), I'm tired of people taking credit for my work.

    We already lack quality news and information, few websites are neutral when posting content. Even Vivaldi doesn't miss the chance to bash other companies as a way of advertising.


  • Ambassador

    It is true that the current copyright law must be modified and there is nothing against this new regulation, except for articles 11 and 13, which are an absolute barbarity, far from reality and basic rights.


  • Community Manager

    @lonm An automated reply implies that they are getting a fair number of emails on the topic 😉


  • Moderator

    @kobi: Article 13 is to demand automatic filters on any website that has user content.

    There are two main problems with automatic filters.

    First they fail a lot because copyright is not a physical reality of nature, it's a construction by the human mind and so has many nuances that computers can't understand. It's already extremely hard for us to know if something is a copyright infringement or not, like for educational purpose or parody.

    And second because it helps monopoly, it's easy for Google and Facebook to implement such filters, they can wipe their asses with money. But a small company, like a startup, will basically give up. Buying such a filter will obviously be super expensive (if there even has someone selling something like that), and writing it yourself is as expensive and if you have a small team the chance of having bugs that will allow stuff that were not meant to is huge, joining with the fact that Article 13 puts you responsible for what your users upload means that you can go bankrupt even before starting just because a single person managed to post something 'infringing'.

    Article 11 is also stupid because you can no longer link anything. Not only link is not defined, leaving it to any meaning your government thinks is a 'link', but you are also responsible for the content of the linked sites. That would be awesome if the internet was a static place where nothing ever is erased or modified, but sites change, they die, they are overtaken. What once was a news sites can now be the next PirateBay, you never know what content that link will hold in the future. You can try saying that content was not infringing back then, but can you prove it? Could it be that you posted when it was not infringing knowing that it would be infringing later? Even if you can get out of that it does not take away the fact that you had to get a lawyer and lose your time and money to prove you are innocent.

    There's a reason why big monopolies are backing those Articles and not individual artists.

    If these articles pass Europe will be nuking their internet startup environment, they will simply make US companies even stronger.


  • Ambassador

    @an_dz said in The Internet should remain open and free:

    @kobi: Article 13 is to demand automatic filters on any website that has user content.

    There are two main problems with automatic filters.

    First they fail a lot because copyright is not a physical reality of nature, it's a construction by the human mind and so has many nuances that computers can't understand. It's already extremely hard for us to know if something is a copyright infringement or not, like for educational purpose or parody.

    And second because it helps monopoly, it's easy for Google and Facebook to implement such filters, they can wipe their asses with money. But a small company, like a startup, will basically give up. Buying such a filter will obviously be super expensive, if there even has someone selling something like that, and writing it yourself is as expensive and if you have a small team the chance of having bugs that will allow stuff that were not meant to is huge, joining with the fact that Article 13 puts you responsible for what your users upload means that you can go bankrupt even before starting just because a single person managed to post something 'infringing'.

    Article 11 is also stupid because you can no longer link anything. Not only link is not defined, leaving it to any meaning your government thinks is a 'link', but you are also responsible for the content of the linked sites. That would be awesome if the internet was a static place where nothing ever is erased or modified, but sites change, they die, they are overtaken. What once was a news sites can now be the next PirateBay, you never know what content that link will hold in the future. You can try saying that content was not infringing back then, but can you prove it? Could it be that you posted when it was not infringing knowing that it would be infringing later? Even if you can get out of that it does not take away the fact that you had to get a lawyer and lose your time and money to prove you are innocent.

    There's a reason why big monopolies are backing those Articles and not individual artists.

    If these articles pass Europe will be nuking their internet startup environment, they will simply make US companies even stronger.

    ....and kill Open Source projects


  • Moderator

    The main MEP's to contact are those from EPP, S&D and ECR, who voted mostly in favour.

    Source: https://juliareda.eu/2018/09/ep-endorses-upload-filters/

    You can also check individually here (needs account):
    https://www.votewatch.eu/en/term8-copyright-in-the-digital-single-market-draft-legislative-resolution-vote-commission-proposal-ordinar.html


  • Moderator

    @lonm: UK MEPs were 50/50, so there's still some to talk with.


  • Moderator

    @catweazle: It wouldn't totally kill them, but would make them more underground.



  • Internet Regulator Considered for UK

    A cross-party committee investigating misinformation and fake news has already suggested areas for new legislation ahead of the White Paper. In July, it recommended:

    • Reforming electoral law for the digital age - including clear rules about political advertising online
    • Taxing social networks to pay for digital literacy programmes in schools
    • Greater transparency around online advertising

    However, Buzzfeed News said the government's proposals would go further. It said it had seen details of the White Paper, which included:

    • Forcing websites to remove illegal hate speech within a specific time period or face penalties. A similar law is in force in Germany
    • Making social networks verify the age of their users
    • Punishing social networks that failed to remove terror content or child abuse images
    • Restricting advertisements online for food and soft drink products that were high in salt, fat or sugar

  • Ambassador

    Web with Link Tax in the future

    Imgur


  • Moderator

    @catweazle The reality would be that Google will probably only have links to Wikipedia.

    But the real reality is that Alphabet (Google parent company) will just make their ad system even more aggressive and invasive to deal with the extra expense.



  • @an_dz Thanks for sharing your knowledge and opinion on the matter, I believe EU will do the right thing.


  • Ambassador

    That which is right or that of the right-wing politics (majority in the European Parliament)? I have my doubts there 😕



  • @catweazle said in The Internet should remain open and free:

    That which is right or that of the right-wing politics (majority in the European Parliament)? I have my doubts there 😕

    The EU is not the USA, they tend to be smarter (Net Neutrality and the Kaspersky Lies, a good example).


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