VERY pleased!



  • I've been a user of Opera for many years, since when I had to buy a license! Was very disappointed to find the way it was being developed, and the loss of support for integrated email. I'm loving the way Vivaldi is coming along, and as soon as the email is sorted I will be switching for good. Please keep up the good work!



  • Opera has the fantastic Opera Turbo feature and will soon have its own Virtual Private Network system due to its recent purchase of a VPN company. So do not rule out Opera as its rock solid even the developer versions run smooth and perform so well. I still cannot understand for the life of me why they both with a sidebar for extensions that really angers me. Why waste more screen when we can use the main panel, why do all these browser makers want to waste screen. Best of it is they never add anything of worth like a url bar etc to the full screen options. For me the dominant browser is still Opera and Vivaldi has a long way to go in its interface, performance, lack of turbo etc if its to beat Opera. Now you are upset with Opera but rest assure no other browser is anywhere near as good right now and hasn't been in a long time. If Opera would listen to suggestions I put forth for Vivaldi etc then it might get somewhere but Opera does what it wants. If I'd been Opera and saw Vivaldi preview I'd have hammered out a lot of development and put Vivaldi right back in their place once and for all but Opera have dragged their feet. Vivaldi needs to concentrate on giving us options on the main panel and less need for clicking.



  • I won't dispute what you say unhived. Vivaldi of course has a long way to go, but I am excited that it has made a start. If it can do the things that you wanted for Opera, you will be happy. And it will make Opera try harder too.
    Competition is always good.
    Think what a mess we would be in now if Microsoft had succeeded in crushing the competition with IE !



  • @unhived:

    Opera has the fantastic Opera Turbo feature and will soon have its own Virtual Private Network system due to its recent purchase of a VPN company. So do not rule out Opera as its rock solid … For me the dominant browser is still Opera and Vivaldi has a long way to go in its interface, performance, lack of turbo etc if its to beat Opera. Now you are upset with Opera but rest assure no other browser is anywhere near as good right now and hasn't been in a long time. ... Opera does what it wants. ...

    To maintain perspective, however, Turbo is only "fantastic" if you need and use it - it's but a single 'feature'. And "soon" for deployment and full integration of VPN capability within the Opera browser is subject to a great deal of interpretation regarding the meaning of 'soon' - ie: "there's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip." Opera is currently 14 or so "final" version iterations into its development history since Blink Opera was introduced, so I would certainly expect it to be "rock solid" by now.

    The frustration with Opera that many users like @SS64 have expressed has had to do with a perception that Opera has foundationally and consciously abandoned fine-level browser configurability and many of the integrated features that made Olde Opera a hallmark browser for a wide variety of users. Moreover, since the redesign, Opera has seemed unwilling to even consider entire classes of user feature and configurability requests, many of them well-explained and persuasively written, and has instead explicitly written them off as "niche"-focused from a narrow group of techno-users. At almost every turn, Opera's responses have been: learn to do without, adapt to the new features, or track down some extension (that too often does not adequately meet the user's needs). Opera is simply now pursuing a different segment of the user population, and that leaves many Olde Opera users and their needs for configurability and included features high and dry. This is why Opera "does what it wants" with respect to such users and their requests.

    Certainly Blink Opera has its place, as do all the other competing browsers out there. It (and they) undoubtedly meet the needs for certain classes of users. But I strongly believe that Opera is no longer interested in seriously accommodating the needs of users who require flexible configurability of a browser and a variety of built-in features and modules - Opera is focused elsewhere. On the other hand, Vivaldi is specifically targeting such users, in large part because that is where lie the hearts of Vivaldi's founders and developers. Vivaldi has a very long way to go, indeed, to become fully polished with its feature set completely filled out. But it has already come a very long way in a very short time… and the developers are seriously listening to users - users who want a browser than can be adapted flexibly to their needs. I personally believe most of what we seek will come to pass, and I believe more so with each tech preview version that emerges.



  • @unhived:

    Opera has the fantastic Opera Turbo feature

    Yes Opera turbo is a fantastic feature, that becomes less fantastic when is managed by Google rather than a small, European, trustworthy company.

    Jon ha already opened a thread about it, and I'm sure that a turbo feature will land on Vivaldi sooner or later.

    So do not rule out Opera as its rock solid even the developer versions run smooth and perform so well.

    Opium is ugly if compared to the real Opera, but yes is still light years better than chrome.

    I still cannot understand for the life of me why they both with a sidebar for extensions that really angers me.

    Likely is one of the best things happened to Opium in two years of development: a sidebar is a door opened to a third party email client, history manager and so on.
    And be sure that we have to thank Vivaldi for that. W/o its competition Opium had to stay asleep like it did in the past two years



  • @SS64:

    I won't dispute what you say unhived. Vivaldi of course has a long way to go, but I am excited that it has made a start. If it can do the things that you wanted for Opera, you will be happy. And it will make Opera try harder too.
    Competition is always good.
    Think what a mess we would be in now if Microsoft had succeeded in crushing the competition with IE !

    We shouldn't knock Internet Explorer it is a very powerful browser its engine is quite radical at some tasks but its downfall is of course it lack of actions or plug-ins and maybe its security. I've given IE a chance and I used it for a while quite liked it apart from the obvious drawbacks. If Microsoft can get Spartan right then I'm sure it could be quite excellent and I'd certainly move over if it makes the changes I would like to see. I'm not a brand snob, if you give me what I need then I will move.

    Well it don't look like Opera is being pushed that hard by Vivaldi all we've had so far from Opera is the audio icon and this dumb sidebar.



  • @Blackbird:

    @unhived:

    Opera has the fantastic Opera Turbo feature and will soon have its own Virtual Private Network system due to its recent purchase of a VPN company. So do not rule out Opera as its rock solid … For me the dominant browser is still Opera and Vivaldi has a long way to go in its interface, performance, lack of turbo etc if its to beat Opera. Now you are upset with Opera but rest assure no other browser is anywhere near as good right now and hasn't been in a long time. ... Opera does what it wants. ...

    To maintain perspective, however, Turbo is only "fantastic" if you need and use it - it's but a single 'feature'. And "soon" for deployment and full integration of VPN capability within the Opera browser is subject to a great deal of interpretation regarding the meaning of 'soon' - ie: "there's many a slip 'twixt cup and lip." Opera is currently 14 or so "final" version iterations into its development history since Blink Opera was introduced, so I would certainly expect it to be "rock solid" by now.

    The frustration with Opera that many users like @SS64 have expressed has had to do with a perception that Opera has foundationally and consciously abandoned fine-level browser configurability and many of the integrated features that made Olde Opera a hallmark browser for a wide variety of users. Moreover, since the redesign, Opera has seemed unwilling to even consider entire classes of user feature and configurability requests, many of them well-explained and persuasively written, and has instead explicitly written them off as "niche"-focused from a narrow group of techno-users. At almost every turn, Opera's responses have been: learn to do without, adapt to the new features, or track down some extension (that too often does not adequately meet the user's needs). Opera is simply now pursuing a different segment of the user population, and that leaves many Olde Opera users and their needs for configurability and included features high and dry. This is why Opera "does what it wants" with respect to such users and their requests.

    Certainly Blink Opera has its place, as do all the other competing browsers out there. It (and they) undoubtedly meet the needs for certain classes of users. But I strongly believe that Opera is no longer interested in seriously accommodating the needs of users who require flexible configurability of a browser and a variety of built-in features and modules - Opera is focused elsewhere. On the other hand, Vivaldi is specifically targeting such users, in large part because that is where lie the hearts of Vivaldi's founders and developers. Vivaldi has a very long way to go, indeed, to become fully polished with its feature set completely filled out. But it has already come a very long way in a very short time… and the developers are seriously listening to users - users who want a browser than can be adapted flexibly to their needs. I personally believe most of what we seek will come to pass, and I believe more so with each tech preview version that emerges.

    You'd be surprised how many people use the turbo feature on Opera especially cell phone junkies who have to panic about the rip-off data rates from their carriers. I use the Turbo feature for a particular reason and I'd have a lot of hassle without it so when I need it then its great and only Yandex offers the same ability to use the Opera Turbo network.



  • @The_Solutor:

    @unhived:

    Opera has the fantastic Opera Turbo feature

    Yes Opera turbo is a fantastic feature, that becomes less fantastic when is managed by Google rather than a small, European, trustworthy company.

    Jon ha already opened a thread about it, and I'm sure that a turbo feature will land on Vivaldi sooner or later.

    So do not rule out Opera as its rock solid even the developer versions run smooth and perform so well.

    Opium is ugly if compared to the real Opera, but yes is still light years better than chrome.

    I still cannot understand for the life of me why they both with a sidebar for extensions that really angers me.

    Likely is one of the best things happened to Opium in two years of development: a sidebar is a door opened to a third party email client, history manager and so on.
    And be sure that we have to thank Vivaldi for that. W/o its competition Opium had to stay asleep like it did in the past two years

    I wasn't aware that Google manages the Opera Turbo feature? If they do then that would be a big cause for concern.

    How can you say Opera is ugly? Opera on Windows is perfectly neat looking and everything has its place and works like a dream and always has done from the start. The only other browsers that may have some features which look better may be Slepneir and Yandex Alpha but but I prefer Opera, Yandex is a resource hog and its tab stacking is awkward. The sidebar on Opera sucks it doesn't have a on/off option that is easily clicked like a panel and its just for boring extensions which we can have at the top with plenty of room in the main panel. In my opinion the sidebar is a total waste of time with Opera they should work on something else.

    Many people seem to ignore the lovely previews in tabs that Opera has and what about the nice tab list menu.



  • @unhived:

    … You'd be surprised how many people use the turbo feature on Opera ...

    I have no doubt about that. But Turbo is just another feature, just as Mail is just another feature… and obviously each is important to its own list of fans for their various reasons - sometimes even both features being important to certain users. But Opera has indicated no plans to integrate Mail back into their browser - they don't recognize a meaningful need, in spite of a myriad of requests for it; whereas Vivaldi indicates their plan is to place both Mail and some form of Turbo-like feature into their browser. Which, IMO, illustrates the focal difference in the two companies. Opera may currently be the more polished and stable browser, if only because of its head start, but it is far more resistant to the needs of users who request configurability and built-in features.



  • @unhived:

    I still cannot understand for the life of me why they both with a sidebar for extensions that really angers me.

    I still cant understand what's your problem with the sidebar. Opera has one, Vivaldi has one, Now even Opium has one.

    If you don't like it just leave it disabled. That's all

    I wasn't aware that Google manages the Opera Turbo feature? If they do then that would be a big cause for concern.

    ging

    I didn't say that google already manages it, but the direction is clear. Opium people are exchanging "favors" with Google, be sure that sooner or later they let all the synchronization and turbo features in Google's hands.

    How can you say Opera is ugly? Opera on Windows is perfectly neat looking and everything has its place and works like a dream and always has done from the start.

    That's the problem. "everything has" works. It's a sentence applicable even to something like Macos… everything has works...

    The problem is that has almost nothing if you compare it to a good OS.

    The same is valid to Opium. Its a browser with a couple of features more than a stupid chrome, but is incredibly poor if you compare it to Opera or even the very first alpha of Vivaldi.

    The only other browsers that may have some features which look better may be Slepneir and Yandex Alpha but but I prefer Opera, Yandex is a resource hog and its tab stacking is awkward

    .

    Ad I said i prefer Opera over other chrome clones, bit that's is not enough to make it a real successor of Opera.

    The sidebar on Opera sucks it doesn't have a on/off option that is easily clicked like a panel and its just for boring extensions which we can have at the top with plenty of room in the main panel. In my opinion the sidebar is a total waste of time with Opera they should work on something else.

    They took 2 years to introduce it, let them some more months to refine it, let some more time to the extensions developers to develop something nice, then start to judge it.

    Many people seem to ignore the lovely previews in tabs that Opera has and what about the nice tab list menu

    Well… I ignore it because I find incredibly annoying the Opium implementation and, to be frank, even the latest Vivaldi one (build xx129) is more annoying than useful.


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