Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi



  • Why do we get a new release so often? Do these guys know what they are doing or is development just trial and error? I worked for forty years in Information Technology and, in the early days, when I was a programmer, I took twice as long as eveyrbody else to get to the testing stage but when I did there were very few bugs. Unlike with everyone else, my testing was minimal because things all worked and follow-up was rarely necessary. Get some discipline into Vivaldi development. I first started using it as I like being able to fine tune the user interface but you guys are getting to be thoroughly annoying. Just save up the changes to once every three months, better still less often than that.



  • @contrajur When you want less updates you can use the stabile Version. Those get fewer updates than the snapshot (beta) version.
    In addition you can still skip updates - especially as you get shown the changelog before you hit the update button.
    Personally I like the fast update cycle - as it feels more dynamic even if this means that they will be a new bug or two.


  • Moderator

    There is no need to use a Snapshot version if you do not want to test new features.

    The Stable get fixes for security patches if needed, and for regressed bugs which stops daily use of a Stable.



  • I was just SOOOOOOOOOO disappointed that the update didn't include the ability to pin tabs again. To me, this is HUGE, and I've tried and tried to get it back; no one seemed to have any answers, and I know I'm not the only one that uses that feature.


  • Moderator

    @contrajur said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    Do these guys know what they are doing or is development just trial and error?

    You ask this seriously?
    Vivaldi is not a OpenSource project done by some strange geeks.

    I worked for forty years in Information Technology and, in the early days, when I was a programmer, I took twice as long as eveyrbody else to get to the testing stage but when I did there were very few bugs

    Then you should know there are different workflows and teams.
    And you never got regressions when third party code changed? You always embedded all code in your program and never uses external OS libraries. You worked alone or in a 100 man team?
    Wow. Then you are a programming god.

    Vivaldi has 3 channels:
    Stable ā€“ for Final version
    Snapshot ā€“ for Beta (testing) versions to show new features to users, fix regressions f.ex. having new Chromium code changes or video/audio problems
    Soprano ā€“ Nightly version for internal tester team with bugfixes/features which will result into a new Snapshot if all is ok

    OK, why do you think we have too much Stable version releases? I can not see this.



  • @contrajur "I was working on the proof of one of my poems all the morning, and took out a comma. In the afternoon I put it back again.
    "Oscar Wilde
    Irish dramatist, novelist, & poet (1854 - 1900)

    You'd like him in your team? I am afraid he no longer is available.


  • Moderator

    @contrajur I do not know if the Vivaldi team needs a dead dandy for help. The team did already a exorcism in 'Exorcism ā€“ Vivaldi browser Snapshot 1.14.1042.3' to get away from bad ghosts creeping thru the code.



  • @gwen-dragon said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    Vivaldi has 3 channels:
    Stable ā€“ for Final version
    Snapshot ā€“ for Beta (testing) versions to show new features to users, fix regressions f.ex. having new Chromium code changes or video/audio problems
    Soprano ā€“ Nightly version for internal tester team with bugfixes/features which will result into a new Snapshot if all is ok
    OK, why do you think we have too much Stable version releases? I can not see this.

    "OK, why do you think we have too much Stable version releases? I can not see this."
    You are issuing too many releases and when they follow one another in just a few days, that is because your organisation, probably that between one team and another, is chaotic and/or to correct a stable release that wasn't. You need more sopranos and to broadcast only when you have it right, You are only fooling yourselves that you have your act together.

    I have been using Vivaldi for eleven months and the only progress of any use to me are being able to use more Chrome extensions, though some do not display their icon as they are supposed to do and most then are useless, keeping those that do function properly displayed in the order you want them and Vivaldi crashes, while still far too often when, for example, you do nothing more daring than click on a bookmark, having improved quite a lot.

    Of course, other users will feel the benefits of new releases differently , depending upon their working practices but nobody needs an oil change and a new fuel pump with only a few extra miles on the clock. Your arguments to the contrary are ludicrous.


  • Moderator

    @ncgull said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    that the update didn't include the ability to pin tabs again

    I can not see where pinning of tabs do not work in 1.13 and 1.14.


  • Moderator

    @contrajur said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    You are issuing too many releases and when they follow one another in just a few days, that is because your organisation, probably that between one team and another, is chaotic and/or to correct a stable release that wasn't. You need more sopranos and to broadcast only when you have it right, You are only fooling yourselves that you have your act together.

    Thank you for your feedback, i have contacted all developers to think about changing the process up to your proposals. Please have a look at https://vivaldi.com/jobs/ if you can upgrade the team.



  • Thank you for taking me seriously. That is all I am asking. My criticism is intended to be constructive. Can you imagine a team supporting a manned NASA mission with you (plural) supporting them? They would all return as vegetables or not at all.

    Most of my working life was managing other people and coordinating their efforts so that the end result was successful. We did not deliver part of a system and expect the users to take it on board. My most difficult project, while managing twenty four people in all and several other projects in parallel, took an average of twelve people over three years and was hugely successful. I am afraid I could not repeat the exercise elsewhere quite as well because at Manufacturers Life in Toronto, Canada, the whole company had its act together more than anywhere else, in my experience at least. Largely, it is a cultural thing.

    This is where I think maybe you need to improve. If I were not too old for it, I might have been interested, if you would have had me. Living in Oslo rather than Reykjavik would have been an interesting experience. The Scandinavians seem to have a better quality of life than other developed countries, no doubt because there is more balance in competing social and economic pressures. Learn to embrace that in your software development too. I am not just talking about writing code, of course.



  • Just save up the changes to once every three months, better still less often than that.

    I beg to differ.
    Nobody is feeding the updates in our throats, I wouldn't just update if I didn't want to.
    On the other hand, I'm more than happy to follow the snapshots because I WANT more updates even weekly. It's a matter of choice.
    The more bugs gets fixed, the better. If I don't have to wait weeks or months for a bug to get fixed, even better.



  • @contrajur This is satire, right? At first i mistook your posts as serious contributions, but then i realised my error.

    On the off-chance though that you actually mean what you've written here, i'll offer this:

    1. If you don't like the Snapshot cadence, don't use Snapshots.
    2. If you don't agree with Snapshots QA, don't use Snapshots.
    3. In event of #1 or #2, use Stable.
    4. If you don't like Stable, why are you here?

    FYI your opinion wrt Snapshots is severely at odds with the majority of V users who have a presence in the forum. That does not ipso facto make us right & you wrong, but it might indicate that your sensibilities & V's strategy are divergent not confluent, such that for your equanimity it might be that another browser could be more soothing to you.



  • @contrajur The only times releases generally "follow one another in just a few days" for the stable version is if there is a needed security update or a signficant bug fix that needs incorporation. For Snapshot versions, the pace will routinely be more often since they are beta, developmental versions. If a security update is pushed out to the stable version, that update will often include a few small fixes that have been 'proofed' to that point in time.

    It's unclear to me what your real concern is here with updates to the stable version. I've worked with the design of digital hardware, computers, and programs continually since the late 1960's (yes, starting in Fortran and discrete transistor logic), and the idea of only releasing a fully completed program once in a blue moon was fine back when hardware, software, and standards were only slowly evolving, and when a designer team had all the keys to a project in their own pockets. But this is not that era, and Vivaldi is not those products.

    This browser is built on an independently-developed chromium engine foundation, which is being changed and evolved continually by its own designers, just as web standards and site coding practices are continually changing as well. Add to that the continually-updated OS products now driving the market and the constantly-discovered security vulnerabilities impacting the OS, browsers, rendering engines, and so on. Like it or not, that is the ocean Vivaldi (and most other software) must swim in today, so unless you prefer to work with an insecure or obsolete browser for long periods of time, you have to adapt to changes coming more often than they did 40 years ago.



  • @blackbird I understand that Opera is from the same company. How come then that their security is so robust then abd rarely needs a fix for bugs? I installed that too recently because I could not go online to my bank for a prolonged period and they said it was related to Chrome. I since learned that that might not have been a good move but, nevertheless, having it, the difference with Vivaldi undermines what you say.



  • @contrajur said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    I understand that Opera is from the same company

    Incorrect.



  • @contrajur Last week on a Dutch tech site. Google 'translated' it for your convineance;

    Opera part that rejected the browser branch, renames to Otello
    The company Opera Software ASA, which sold its browser branch Opera Software AS to a Chinese consortium in 2016, changes its name to Otello Corporation. That is a requirement that the buyers asked at the time, the company reports.

    A spokesperson for Opera explains to TNW that, when selling the consumer branch, including its browser department, it had been agreed that a transition period would apply in which the company could still use the name Opera. That has now ended. The Chinese companies also bought the rights to use the name at the acquisition. The change of name was determined during an extraordinary meeting of the Norwegian company.

    The change only applies to the parts of the company that are left over after the sale. These included Bemobi and the American branch of Opera Mediaworks, which among other things compiles reports and is now called AdColony again. The acquisition was closed a little more than a year ago. One of the participating companies of the consortium was the Chinese Qihoo 360, which is active in the security sector.

    So pls stop moaning about a non existing problem and get informed before you post typical Fake News



  • @gwen-dragon I am using version 1.13.1008.40, and Vivaldi will not hold my pinned tabs when I close down and restart it. It used to do that, but I haven't been able to do it on Vivaldi for at least the last two- maybe 3 updates now. I do lots of research on things, and having the browser hold those pinned tabs until I released them was VERY valuable to me.


  • Moderator

    @ncgull Have you checked to ensure every Vivaldi app and process in Task Manager is stopped before you try to re-start it again? There is a bug with persisten processes that is being worked on right now.



  • @contrajur said in Just dying for a new release of Vivaldi:

    @blackbird I understand that Opera is from the same company. ...

    Either there's some misunderstanding or miscommunication going on. Opera and Vivaldi are not 'from the same company', they are entirely separate and different enterprises. Briefly: once upon a time (1994), Jon von Tetzchner was instrumental in starting the original Opera ASA company that developed the first Opera browsers (called Olde Opera by some of us); in 2011, Jon left Opera ASA, but that company continued developing Opera browsers and operating the Opera Community, eventually abandoning its original proprietary Presto rendering engine in 2013 and adopting the chromium engine which had been (and continues to be) developed and released as open source under a spin-off organization from Chrome.

    In 2014, frustrated when the Opera Community was abruptly shut down by Opera ASA and coupled with growing dissatisfaction with browser development trends in the marketplace, Jon joined with Tatsuki Tomita to found Vivaldi as a new enterprise, leading initially to the Vivaldi Community and in 2016, the first Vivaldi browser.

    Vivaldi is also based on the chromium rendering engine, as is the current Opera browser; however, they have entirely different user interface layers sitting upon that engine. Vivaldi heavily focuses itself on its community of users, seeking to provide as much customization and feature sets contained within the browser as possible - hence "a browser for our friends". Opera and Chrome are pursuing a mass market that appeals to users wanting only a simple, streamlined browser with relatively few controls and built-in features. Opera has existed as an entity for over 20 years, Vivaldi has existed only for about 3 years or so (with their browser only available for less than 2 years).

    Contrary to what you seem to indicate, the release tracks (and bug rates) for both Opera and Vivaldi are rather parallel, both having simultaneous developmental and stable versions and both updating on roughly similar time frames, much of that dominated by having to update soon after chromium releases new engine updates (often for security fixes). Vivaldi differs in that, as a browser, it relies on major HTML coding for its user interface in order to enable levels of customization and novel potential features that Opera (and Chrome) have simply elected not to pursue with their user interface structures; instead, those companies have chosen to go largely "stock" with the features and limited customizations directly available from the chromium engine. Vivaldi is plowing a lot of new ground with its approach to the user interface concept, and in the meantime, it must deal with chromium engine updates arriving on a schedule set by chromium, not Vivaldi. Those of us who are excited to see where Vivaldi is headed have learned to be patient while things unfold, and to be somewhat forgiving with the occasional bugs that find their way into stable versions... the result is already greatly worth it to us.


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