Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings



  • hello Quinca71
    fireworks, Broadway, Rookie, narc., bubbles. boot hill. I am so hungry I could eat a ...
    Sometimes one's city of birth or home city or last city, like it or not, earns the the city name as the nickname.
    or I'll eat my hat.



  • @i_ri

    Another world to me. Can't even do idea. Good trajectory to you. As for "nicks" is a common usage here too.



  • hello Quinca71
    one engage thinking, use your noodle.
    ato falho. slow as molasses in winter. Not playing with a full deck at the moment. red card. You can't cure dumb.
    mickey mouse. tinkerbell. and where goofy got nicknamed, BuenaPark. Hollywood. Timbuktoo. Kalamazoo. In different sphere the nicks would be Knickerbachers. nickname of a nickname?, and when applied to Nicolas? stupendous.
    wikipedia.. "Diana, Princess of Wales declared Duran Duran her favourite band, and the band were dubbed "The Fab Five" by the British press, comparing them to The Beatles whose nickname was The Fab Four." .wikipedia
    In the smallest of spheres we made-up a word for the unsavory, disgusting, semi-sedentary foam that floats at the lake's edge. This word of invention introduced a vocal gibe of varied occassion within the small sphere.

    Bring big the lip [to pout] brings teasing sometimes or is brought in response to mean or disappointing. Gestures can be a type of immediate nicknamecalling. malicious gesturing? nicknames of the moment/ passing. (?) space cadet. Feign speak 2-way radio "Earth calling <enter name>. Come-In <enter name here>. You there? Base calling <enter name>. Come back."
    Those that last...Thumb up. The accused is brought to execution. The executioner awaits the final signal to proceed or cancel. What if thumb down is given. signal cancel or death?
    The thumb and forefinger touching forms circle means Okay or zero?
    Two fingers held up means peace, victory, or vivaldi?
    How does one flash hand signal the vivaldi sign on the streets?
    Well I never ... What if a person got the nickname name of the browser they use! ?

    . flash the vivaldi vivaldi sign .



  • @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    How does one flash hand signal the vivaldi sign on the streets?

    Maybe Vivaldi



  • @i_ri

    Lots of load for my little truck. Heaven be merciful to me.



  • hello Quinca71
    Have a fun trip.
    We purposefully limit our practice to having the small truck. A long breath can be longer than this small truck. Nonetheless We always enjoy the journey in the small truck. The only thing impossible with the small truck is to sleep in the small truck. We must make our bed outside the small truck.

    We wish for You good rest and good health.

    When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself, art cannot become manifest, strength cannot be exerted, wealth is useless, and reason is powerless. ___Herophilos

    And give my regards to the dog.

    .Out to Lunch.



  • @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    i have understanding that in Germany if one is dumb or clumsy or unlucky one might be said to have done a Meier. anyone concur?

    It is not in common use nowadays; it died out about the 18th century when the profession of a Meier (i.e. administrator of an estate) vanished and before that you really wanted to be one, if you didn't belong to the nobility.



  • @i_ri

    Have you observed that "Lots of load for my little truck" is another way of saying that someone is falling short of what is being treated? Said in my language, seems better than moved for another language. "Muita areia pr'o meu 'camiãozin' " [something like "Too much sand (for the load weight capacity) for my wee truck")].

    @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Do not imagine become me; you might be trading for a step backward from salvation, eh. too much work

    This excerpt brings the main motif because I continued maintaining my dialogue with you. Tremendous.

    Almost arriving to the 500 posts. Ending limit to put a final to my interventions on internet. God help me to replace all this verbiage by the silence (including the mental one), requisite incomparably conducive to re link myself with Him, unique attitude really valid in the life.



  • Quinca71 and everyone
    On topic. degree of malice. Seems that the degree of malice when applied to these sayings can yet be determined by the listener, receive of the remark while not expressly determined by the speaker, send directing the remark.

    outside the category of jeer. Definition disagreement of a single word can be trouble. example Draw could mean draw weapon and fire! challenge. Or Draw is crayon to paper. I think that is a funny one , so Draw first. Next, reality that the words Right Now may be calling on the combat Now (Draw first!), or a contraction of _ oh i acknowledge seeing you hello nice to see you and everything is all fine and Right with me Now. Similar and to compound misinterpretation comes addition this jeer factor that you introduce. wow. this could be then taken to a degree not intended. Did we get that correct? example the one word fool. beware the one you call fool does not say Right Now. The zinger may become the zingee. Truly? Really?

    Off topic. Honorable Quinca71 at 499 posts is a good beginning. Dê-nos hoje o pão nosso de cada dia.. The consideration for this? remuneration? silence? everything has an opposing side. What to write is yours. Pirate talk. a nice hi hello how are ye in literature is abrupt hhRye. abrupt is negative. gets nicer the more dwell on the Rrrrrr of howaRrrrrrrye. Do not be negative with the pirate. Rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr rrrrrrrr (not to be mistaken for the with malice roar.)
    The pirate's favorite letter is "C."



  • 0_1500794622025_Norman Rockwell - The Stay at Homes (Outward Bound) (1927).jpg
    Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1978) Norman Rockwell (American, 1894-1978). The Stay at Homes (Outward Bound), 1927. Story illustration for Ladies' Home Journal, October 1927. Oil on canvas. 39 1/4 x 32 1/2 in. (99.7 x 82.6 cm). From the permanent collection of the Norman Rockwell Museum. © The Norman Rockwell Estate / Licensed by Norman Rockwell Licensing Company, Niles, Illinois



  • @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Draw could mean draw weapon and fire! challenge. Or Draw is crayon to paper. I think that is a funny one , so Draw first.

    Draw could also refer to random choosing/picking - as in a Lottery Draw.
    It could also refer to intake - as in to draw breath.

    Next, reality that the words Right Now may be calling on the combat Now (Draw first!), or a contraction of _ oh i acknowledge seeing you hello nice to see you and everything is all fine and Right with me Now.

    Right now would usually be understood to mean immediately - as in the command, Do it right now!

    Your example would normally be Alright now. It also implies that something was wrong earlier - as in I'm alright now but had a cold last week. Another use could just the greeting "Alright?" -as in Are you alright?



  • hello Quinca71
    Draw can also mean impasse. The extended alternate definitions example the confound of interpretation. It did not serve the example to list all of the definitions in this construction for amusement. Correct that alright fits here. The problem with alright is that though it is used as TbGbe indicates, vocalized, it was not considered a proper word when I was learning english, and I yet am uncomfortable to write it; cannot depend on alright to be in the english dictionary on your end. for use in my example the "now" is the important factor, therefore right now is used. Something wrong earlier, for a long time, or right now. The consequences are about to be experienced directly of focus. direct. The alright has no now though it would be understood by the interpreting listener it would not be known by the reader. Guessing right now is near enough a universal example that the gist in your language could be directly discerned. Straight as an arrow TbGbe, thank you, alright, and yourself? Personally I am very lazy with the all right it is more to aight lazily when I am not calling on a fight.



  • hello Quinca71 and TbGbe and Everyone

    offer the nickname word mushroom: low status or little consequence: kept in the dark and fed manure.
    . or strictly in english: fungi = fun guy.

    offer the nickname word stinky: odorous.
    . or the expression "little stinker" deals with attitude: onerous, noncompliant, Travesso



  • @i_ri There is some objection to alright - however, it is accepted to have the same meaning as "all right" as "standard English". If you are not happy with "alright", you may use the expanded "all right"
    See https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/all-right-or-alright

    However, just using "right" / "right now" would mean immediately as I said before, it does not have the same meaning as "all right now" which is how you seem to be using it.

    . or the expression "little stinker" deals with attitude: onerous, noncompliant, Travesso

    Not quite :smile: "little stinker" (with s ) would convey mild annoyance whereas onerous conveys more annoyance and possibly offensive.

    Travesso translates to "pranks/prankster" and so would be better using the nickname "little tinker" (no s ) which is used when you wish convey (well meaning) amusement with someone. That is, no offence has been taken (definitely not malicious).



  • hello Quinca71 . hi TbGbe

    ha. even our cat says alright. ! yes we have a cat, Lucky, she vocalizes hi, hello, thank you, now, and alright. Another of the cats does not say alright, but he, Ranger R boy cat, he says wow and cool. (along with hi, hello) The other cats and dogs are not beyond the hi and hello except one dog says water and out. I am attempting with them to say drink and snack and love. Drink may be hopeless. Talking animals; The life of Riley for a hobo, stick-in-the-mud.

    the nickname word clown: We blame this malicious name on clowns that are not funny. Clowns should work on their reputation.

    a snail on a doorknob

    Slow. rather circular. Steadily getting nowhere. A different speed of running in circles. You Stop complaining or I will nail your other foot to the floor.



  • Not holding my purpose. "The flesh is weak." To my chagrin.

    Odd Comparisons.

    • Ugly
      More ugly than a scythe's fight in the dark.
    • Lost
      More lost than blind caught in gunfire.


  • Exchange of "courtesies". Long ago, in this area, it was not uncommon for two guys to talk, and one of them, bored and annoyed by the other's content and behavior, would tell him, "See if I'm around the corner."

    He was at risk of hearing the answer: "Yes, then lend me the halter, so I can bring you back."



  • hello Quinca71
    we watched a December 2017 film yesterday. in the dialogue this nickname is used: butterfingers



  • @i_ri
    It is always difficult to "convey" the effect that a way of saying has within a language to another language. In this transmission, the expression is rarely exempt from losing its "soul".

    "Butterfingers", put at Google's translator, English to Portuguese, gives us:
    "a clumsy person, especially one who fails to hold a catch."

    And as an example:
    "The result: timeless songs full of jangling guitars and giggling vocals and lyrics about being a lovesick butterfingers in a world of emotional icebergs."

    Sum up, we do not have here (or Google didn't find it) one "solo"-word to express which "butterfingers" express.

    The less distant of it would be, here, "Mão-Mole", something as "floppy-hands", which is too weak in face of the vigor of "Butterfingers".

    But, "valeu"!



  • @quinca71 said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    And as an example:
    "The result: timeless songs full of jangling guitars and giggling vocals and lyrics about being a lovesick butterfingers in a world of emotional icebergs."

    Don't know why this brings me another topic rolling at those Forums: "What are you listening to right now?" hehe.


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