Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings



  • Cognomen

    1-For Bald Men = Few-Tile or Slide-of-Lice.

    2-Man very meager and straightened = 6-O'Clock-Sharp.

    Ways to say:

    1- "So slim that his pajamas have only two stripes"

    2- "Harder than a bat to donate blood"

    3-"Harder than saci (see image below) crossing the legs".

    This is / was originally said among the most popular layer in my country.
     
    Remembered at the moment. Said in the language of the country, they can have more salt and pepper than translated. Let's try.

    Saci or Saci-Pererê - Mythological figure of Brazilian folklore.

    0_1499652292022_Saci-Pereê.jpg

    From: https://www.google.com.br/search?q=Imagens+de+saci-pererê&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjKns6Y9f3UAhUHlJAKHYWXBCAQ7AkITQ&biw=1415&bih=686&dpr=1.1



  • Example of using one of the sentences:

    Vivaldi failing to release the M3 in the next version is harder than saci crossing the legs.

    There could, however, be people who would not put the verb to fail in the above sentence. So the text would be: "Vivaldi throwing the M3 in the next version is harder than etc., etc." :fingers_crossed: Not me.



  • I avoid (and even hate) giving pseudonyms related to certain physical or psychological aspects, whether repulsive or not. However, when I meet one, given by anyone, often with a degree of acute feeling of malevolent criticism, sometimes I can not resist and, inwardly, I go until to guffaw. If anyone can laugh in noisy, silently...



  • @Quinca71 said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    These examples have opposite meanings:

    Example of using one of the sentences:

    Vivaldi failing to release the M3 in the next version is harder than saci crossing the legs.

    In this sentence you are expecting Vivaldi to provide M3.
    As you are saying Vivaldi will not fail.

    i.e. Releasing Vivaldi without M3 would be harder than saci crossing his legs.

    There could, however, be people who would not put the verb to fail in the above sentence. So the text would be: "Vivaldi throwing the M3 in the next version is harder than etc., etc." :fingers_crossed: Not me.

    In this sentence you do not expect Vivaldi to include M3 in the next release (assuming that by throwing you actually mean including).

    i.e. Releasing Vivaldi with M3 would be harder than saci crossing his legs.

    Side note: In English you would probably use "more difficult" than "harder"

    I guess the English equivalent phrase to "harder than saci crossing his legs" would be
    "more difficult than getting blood from a stone"



  • First place: thank you for joining me on this question of doubtful interest.

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    These examples have opposite meanings:

    There are two sentences: the first one is from an optimist. The second, from a negative. The first one finds or "cheers" that M3 comes in the next version of V. The second bet, on the contrary, that M3 in the next version of V is impossible. Both can use the expression for their positions. These examples do not refer to myself. They are imaginary people only for illustrate.

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    (assuming that by throwing you actually mean including).

    No, I intended say release. In my dictionary, the following words are given as synonyms of release: drop, shed, throw, relinquish, unhand. I believe "throw" may be less usual. But, seems correct to me.

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    I guess the English equivalent phrase to "harder than saci crossing his legs" would be
    "more difficult than getting blood from a stone"

    Yes, I agree. Your example, I know it from here, thus, I believe it is more divulged over the world.
    I would like you to bring more examples of your knowledge. Both of them sayings and nicknames (pseudonyms).

    Editing and adding
    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Side note: In English you would probably use "more difficult" than "harder"

    For my posts, I first make an essay in English. Then, I put into the translator. I would prefer "more difficult" because is much more alike our way of saying. The damned translator replaced it for "harder" and I had not courage of disavowing.



  • hello Quinca71 and TbGbe and Saci-Pererê
    though using one of those ough; even tougher = harder = more difficult
    upon reaching qualified listener will assimilate correctly.
    This can be be expressed from alternate easier than -

    • to pass the camel through the eye of the needle.
    • Ronaldo scoring golo from throw-in position.

    How about if
    we do not argue the surrounding words of introduction?, sometimes none fit, none necessary,
    it refers to such as,
    the real message is within the shared phrase.

    ((sometimes this is about having a certain specified someone to open his wallet. the queen joining at our table. hades freezing.))



  • @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    to pass the camel through the eye of the needle.

    This is the most highlighted. Do you know say the author's name? And know the origin of these words?



  • hello Quinca71
    The Bible



  • @i_ri

    Forgive me, not the Bible, but, Our Lord Jesus Christ.



  • @Quinca71 said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    The first one finds or "cheers" that M3 comes in the next version of V. The second bet, on the contrary, that M3 in the next version of V is impossible.

    Yes, that is opposite opinions.

    Both can use the expression for their positions. These examples do not refer to myself. They are imaginary people only for illustrate.

    Sorry, I did not mean you personally ( @Quinca71 ) I meant the generic "you" - just meaning the person who is speaking/writing.

    No, I intended say release. In my dictionary, the following words are given as synonyms of release: drop, shed, throw, relinquish, unhand. I believe "throw" may be less usual. But, seems correct to me.

    Well, it would be a version of Vivaldi which is released. Access to the feature M3 would be included in that version of Vivaldi.

    Unfortunately, release has two meanings :-

    1. To issue or make available (for software, movies, games, books etc.)
    2. To unlock or let go

    It seems your translator was using the second meaning when looking for synonyms.

    @i_ri

    we do not argue the surrounding words of introduction?, sometimes none fit, none necessary,
    it refers to such as, the real message is within the shared phrase.

    Agreed, but the subject of this thread is "sayings". So I understood @Quinca71 to be interested in the surrounding words specifically. As in language idioms and metaphors.
    Hence his use of the "saci" metaphor (which I have never heard before, but understood the meaning of with the help of the description).

    Ronaldo scoring golo from throw-in position.

    If the throw-in causes a defender to score an "own goal"; that would probably be attributed to Ronaldo by his fans. :goal:

    Easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle [ than for a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven. ]

    Both correct. It is a quotation from the Gospels of both Matthew and Mark in the (King James) Bible and attributed to a parable preached by Jesus Christ. :grin:

    I'm still waiting to see where he is heading regarding pseudonyms.
    "malicious nicknames" could get out of hand and cause problems in a public forum.



  • @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Agreed, but the subject of this thread is "sayings". So I understood @Quinca71 to be interested in the surrounding words specifically. As in language idioms and metaphors.

    Perfectly situated. Intelligence and erudition are always welcome.

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    It seems your translator was using the second meaning when looking for synonyms.

    Subtlety that escaped from me. So, I agree with the word you have chosen ("included").

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Both correct..

    Here, I beg license to differ. I asked who is the author of the words, not the medium that acts for their propagation.

    @TbGbe said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    I'm still waiting to see where he is heading regarding pseudonyms.
    "malicious nicknames" could get out of hand and cause problems in a public forum.

    I have included two aspects very susceptible to malice. The risk of misrepresentation can reach both. Now, however, I could see from @TbGbe that the theme "nicknames" may be subject to more sensitive and serious consequences. I regret not having occurred to me before I started. And I thank @TbGbe for the warning.

    Then I submit to moderation if the theme can continue or it should be canceled. If it is decided by the latter alternative, I express my full acceptance. And this is said, not because my acceptance, or not, matters to the decision. But because I know how carefully moderators deal with our feelings.



  • hello Quinca71

    hi TbGbe Y'got me. maybe my thinking cap was too tight. Oh nurse ... please bring to me my tonic. I failed to create impossibilty with invention of a phrase. I make "own goal" from your throw-in. One for your side, Einstein. You brainiac. yes, Professor. Yes, Doctor. Is this where we get into trouble for name-calling? You are correct. Name-calling has never been allowed. Living on the fault line, I am. Quinca71 show us some generic name-calling before it gets personal. Feelin' frisky? Prefer not those of physical characteristics but those of personal traits allowed. Be suave.



  • hello Quinca71
    while attempting to deny myself internet research on the subject, so that it is from only my background, is the discipline of the moment. nicknames seem to derive from actions of shared historical figures. Real and fictional. Some beneficial, some rotten. like sports figures. or Kachina. traitors and heroes. weak and strong. comic book. spiritual. based on success or failure. Many sarcastically based on a verb.
    i have understanding that in Germany if one is dumb or clumsy or unlucky one might be said to have done a Meier. anyone concur?
    Webster now is either bookworm or internet addict.
    Webster compiled english dictionary; webster surfs the world wide web. webster is a skeleton.

    a nonsensical:
    Looks good from my house. We're done.

    yes Quinca71 We may discover from those who participate that region representing the greatest diplomacy.
    shared locally
    Within this vivaldi arena the tony character is assigned: Tony did it.; Maybe it was tony.
    Longterm share of this would advance to: Tony?



  • @i_ri said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Tony did it

    Your grand-pa?



  • 0_1499968445584_vtonyty.png Tony lavaball is shared locally in vivaldi sphere. tony is the reddish lavaball. mascot vivaldi.



  • @Quinca71 said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    And know the origin of these words?

    It is not from a parable. From my memory and devotion, I believe without error (so much that I will not check in the Bible) that Jesus commented on a rich young man who diminished his ardor, when Jesus advised him that if he wanted to be perfect that he went to his house, sold all he had , gave to the poor and followed Him.
    Seeing the reduction of the young man's ardor, when he heard such recommendations, it was when Jesus commented on the camel and the bottom of the needle, less difficult than a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. Eight days after this episode, Jesus went up the mountain and transfigured Himself.

    My question above asks about the origin of the episode and the seemingly strange connection of a camel with a needle.



  • @Quinca71 said in Malicious ways of nicknames and sayings:

    Then I submit to moderation if the theme can continue or it should be canceled. If it is decided by the latter alternative, I express my full acceptance. And this is said, not because my acceptance, or not, matters to the decision. But because I know how carefully moderators deal with our feelings.

    To ease the moderation of an intervention in this post that I opened, in this period in which mods are so busy on much more relevant subjects and functionalities, I decide to take the following action:

    I remove nicknames from the subject keeping only those referring to "sayings". To do this, I'll remove the word "nicknames" from the title by editing it. If, during the last three days after this publication, no pronouncement occurs, I will do so, giving my intention as permitted.



  • Quinca71
    Please proceed in confidence with topic. no objection lodged.
    Do not vacillate.
    Staying on-topic: we suggest You do not be namby pamby , do not be sour grapes, and we found the word Accismus.



  • @Quinca71 Actually, my concern was more with the "malicious ways" than with the nicknames.
    Perhaps you are simply interested in the differences between languages/cultures when using common (well known) nicknames and sayings?

    Religious quotes being one example (but avoiding in depth discussions of the merits of religion itself).

    @i_ri "accismus" is a word I have not come across before. You have just increased my vocabulary, thank you.



  • In my earliest Bible readings, when I read the phrase, "It is easier for a camel to go through the depths of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven" (I am moving to English straight from what is said in my language, without I worry about comparisons with the English text), I understood the scope of the sentence.

    But I was astonished: why did Jesus put a camel through the needle? Would not a twine or rope be more fitting, since the needle, depending on the width of its incision, only accepts very thin threads?

    I have already read two approaches on the subject: one from a text of the Spiritist religion, if I remember correctly, stating that "camel" would also be the name of a large-caliber rope that existed at that time in that region.

    The second came from my doctor. It would be an existing canyon in a desert, probably not far from where Jesus lived, or where Jesus most often stayed, since He Himself declared that He had nowhere to lay His head. It was a gorge where several camel caravans drove.

    In this gorge was a passage between two mountains, whose contours narrowed from the top to the base, so that they almost united as they reached the level of the passage. The camels were placed in an Indian file, one after the other, and, arriving at this narrowing, it was with extreme difficulty that they transposed it.

    The locals called it "Needle Bottom", or, to facilitate the move to English, "Eye of the Needle".

    I would taken the second hypothesis.

    Anyone else introduce themselves?


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