Vivaldi license?



  • Which one license vivaldi is using? it seems open source, but I can't find more details about that? because I won't use any closed browser, if vivaldi is planning to be closed in the future then I will leave this browser as soon as I get this information.





  • @luciothiago I find it a bit irritating that this kind of question (which seems to be very crucial to you) only comes to your mind after at least 18 days.
    But Pesala is right - I guess you'll gonna leave us.



  • ok thank you, chromium user again, bye


  • Vivaldi Translator

    @luciothiago
    The parts you see "special" on Vivaldi are close to public as far I understand.
    Anything Chromium based is open.

    Anyway, I think this's the closest what you ask.
    vivaldi://terms/



  • I find it quite strange to choose software basing on its license being open source or not rather than the functionality it provides.
    I'm not saying that it's not important at all, it's just that in some cases you just don't have any other choice anyway...



  • Technically, Vivaldi is closed source. But that doesn't mean it's impossible to view the source or to contribute to it. People are doing it all the time. Here's a thread, for example, where someone contributed to Vivaldi by contacting the developers.

    According to a Vivaldi developer on Reddit, people have submitted changes to him, and he has added those changes. I would suggest, based on that information, that you contact Vivaldi staff and submit your changes to them.

    And according to Jon Tetzchner, while everything they do may not be open source, the changes they made to Chromium are open under a BSD license and available for download at vivaldi.com/source

    All our changes to Chromium source code are under a BSD license and hence can read by anyone. The details are explained in the the README and LICENSE files, within that package.

    In addition, all of our UI code (included in normal packages) is written in plain, readable text. This means that all parts of Vivaldi are full audit-able and open from that perspective.



  • @pafflick

    it's just that in some cases you just don't have any other choice anyway...

    Personally, I agree with you. I prefer if the software I use is open source, but if a proprietary piece of software has something I need that open source alternatives don't, I'll use the proprietary software. But not everyone sees it that way, some people only use open source software as a matter of principle and will avoid any and all proprietary software - this, in the pursuit of the freedom, and sometimes privacy, to use their computers as they see fit as opposed to how software developers think their software should be used.

    re: Richard Stallman, the FSF, and the FSM



  • @dLeon I got it, thank you



  • @Tiamarth vivaldi is only a proprietary skin for chromium, is that a right assumption?



  • @Tiamarth open source browser matters when the software can violate our privacy, but software that don't deal with personal data doesn't make any difference being propietary or open source



  • @luciothiago

    @luciothiago said in Vivaldi license?:

    [...] but software that don't deal with personal data doesn't make any difference being propietary or open source

    From my point of view all software that runs on a computer with a network access of any given kind potentially deals with your "personal data". Just because it's (e.g.) an image design tool doesn't mean it can't collect data about you.



  • @luciothiago said in Vivaldi license?:

    @Tiamarth vivaldi is only a proprietary skin for chromium, is that a right assumption?

    That's a blunt way of putting it, but yes. People can still view and edit the source of the skin the Vivaldi devs built, as it's human readable, but it's not "officially" open source. I'm certain I've seen people explain the CEO's reasons as to why it's still proprietary, but I'm afraid I don't currently have or remember that information. On Linux, you can view and edit Vivaldi's source in /opt/vivaldi/ or in /opt/vivaldi-snapshot/ I don't know the paths for other platforms off the top of my head.

    @luciothiago said in Vivaldi license?:

    @Tiamarth open source browser matters when the software can violate our privacy, but software that don't deal with personal data doesn't make any difference being propietary or open source

    Vivaldi's privacy policy might be of interest to you.



  • Needless to say, there have been several previous threads on this topic, such as Please Open Source this Vivaldi


  • Vivaldi Translator

    @luciothiago
    A user (I forgot his/her user name) post that he/she coded speed tweaks for Vivaldi in this forum. The code provided in Github.

    After Vivaldi devs review it. It seem some of the patch was excepted. He/she probably part of the main dev team by now.

    So, close not entirely super tight close. The devs just choosy & make a close watch, who will be do things.

    Vivaldi Browser Source Code
    Probably that mentioned user start from those sources.
    I could expect, after the devs approve his/her ability, that user now enjoy real time current codes.


    I won't join conversation about close or open source issue.
    It will be super multiple pages with no end.
    Been there done that. :rofl:



  • @dLeon
    It was introduced in the snapshot release 1.9.804.3
    0_1492081010567_code.png


  • Vivaldi Translator

    thanks WillyYu

    Ah yeah, good. Kudos for him/her.



  • @Tiamarth Yeah, I know that some people use Open Source software as a principle, but I guess it only goes as far as your job. Therefore, in many cases, people will have to go against their principles if they want to make for a living...


Log in to reply
 

Looks like your connection to Vivaldi Forum was lost, please wait while we try to reconnect.