Borders.



  • Seriously, using borderless programs like Vivaldi in a windowed environment is a HUGE pain in the mikta (to quote Stargate SG1). It leads to so many problems of clicking the wrong thing. It is early days for Vivaldi and I hope it can become what Opera once was. But... The lack of borders is a deal-breaker. The thing is, it had to be programmed specifically to remove them. They're there by default. Please please please f-cking please, give us back the borders.



  • I for instance love frameless windows. I even requested them for Windows 10…
    I don't think borders are there by default. Vivaldi doesn't use a native interface. Thus there's nothing by default.



  • @Aravis:

    The lack of borders is a deal-breaker.

    You're really trying to tell the "lack of borders" doesn't allow you to use the program? Seriously? :blink:

    @Christoph142:

    I for instance love frameless windows.

    Word!

    someone



  • @Christoph142:

    I for instance love frameless windows. I even requested them for Windows 10…
    I don't think borders are there by default. Vivaldi doesn't use a native interface. Thus there's nothing by default.

    I also love frameless windows. It looks so much cleaner for me.



  • In Win 10 everything is borderless and hardly that can be considered a bad thing.



  • @Em-a-il:

    … I also love frameless windows. It looks so much cleaner for me.

    Cleanliness of appearance doesn't especially equate to ease of use. Try opening and overlaying multiple programs, all with white or pale grey themes, on your system, copying from or referring to one, while working in another. Click outside the invisible frame line on the active window by even a tiny bit and your focus is hijacked, your perhaps carefully-arranged screen view is scrambled, and your frustration level is elevated - if only so slightly. After the third or fourth or tenth such "oops", you will find yourself expressing not-so-kind words in the direction of the designers who neglected to put lines or borders around each app, as steam starts rising from your collar. There are reasons well beyond the mere cosmetic for apps and functional areas within apps to be demarked by borders and lines. At the end of the day, those lines and borders reduce workload stress and frustration by supplying necessary visual cues to aid in accomplishing work - especially long-duration work.


  • Moderator

    @Blackbird:

    @Em-a-il:

    … I also love frameless windows. It looks so much cleaner for me.

    Cleanliness of appearance doesn't especially equate to ease of use. Try opening and overlaying multiple programs, all with white or pale grey themes, on your system, copying from or referring to one, while working in another. Click outside the invisible frame line on the active window by even a tiny bit and your focus is hijacked, your perhaps carefully-arranged screen view is scrambled, and your frustration level is elevated - if only so slightly. After the third or fourth or tenth such "oops", you will find yourself expressing not-so-kind words in the direction of the designers who neglected to put lines or borders around each app, as steam starts rising from your collar. There are reasons well beyond the mere cosmetic for apps and functional areas within apps to be demarked by borders and lines. At the end of the day, those lines and borders reduce workload stress and frustration by supplying necessary visual cues to aid in accomplishing work - especially long-duration work.

    I cannot support you enough on this. Clear visual cues as to where things begin and end are essential. They don't have to be obtrusive or "stylish." They just need to be there.



  • Open the Vivaldi program directory, then go to Application\1.0.94.2\resources\vivaldi\style, and open common.css. At the end of that file write:

    #browser {
    	border: 1px solid #999 !important;
    }
    

    Restart Vivaldi, and you should get a border.



  • @toscho said in Borders.:

    Open the Vivaldi program directory, then go to Application\1.0.94.2\resources\vivaldi\style, and open common.css. At the end of that file write:

    #browser {
    	border: 1px solid #999 !important;
    }
    

    Restart Vivaldi, and you should get a border.

    Want native border. This is not useful.


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