Hide the back arrow when there's nothing to go back to



  • If one doesn't want to see the back arrow that takes one back to a previous page (and shows past history on a long press), this code in custom.css works for me (latest Vivaldi snapshot on Linux 1.7.725.3 (Official Build) dev (64-bit)):

    .toolbar-addressbar .button-toolbar:disabled svg {
        visibility: hidden !important;
    }
    

    This code won't affect seeing the back arrow otherwise.



  • @aesouza In Vivaldi hooks I use this: it should work with custom.css too

    button.button-toolbar[disabled] {
    display: none;
    }

    (Actually this will hide other grayed out buttons)



  • @Hadden89 said in Hide the back arrow when there's nothing to go back to:

    @aesouza In Vivaldi hooks I use this: it should work with custom.css too

    button.button-toolbar[disabled] {
    display: none;
    }

    (Actually this will hide other grayed out buttons)

    I haven't figured out how to use Vivaldi hooks :(

    With my "shades-of-gray" color scheme, I had trouble telling the difference between the grayed-out and normal button after I reduced the latter's opacity by half (because "normal" was too bright for me). So I figured on making the disabled one invisible using visibility: hidden to keep spacing unaffected.



  • @aesouza said

    I haven't figured out how to use Vivaldi hooks :(

    It's not so hard, I used this procedure:

    1. Download latest vivaldi hooks from github (updated for snapshots)
    2. Do a "vivaldi hooks" folder in Vivaldi root folder.
    3. Look readme in it, and open vivaldi\hooks subfolder
    4. There you'll see premade scripts pretty much explained.
    5. Open you custom.css and start to split all your code based on the effect they do (Eg: tab color.css; buttonhide.css) in minimal .css .js files. Probably you can also copy the whole custom.css there.... but split is better... as you can enable/disable script by the vivaldi UI, then ;) (restart required).
    6. Open a new explorer folder, and return to vivaldi root folder and got to application<last version number>\resources
    7. Simply drag (be sure to drag ON file and NOT in folder) the "vivaldi" folder onto installhooks.bat (the one of step 2). It should work then. If not, grant admin to .bat and remove lock to file.
    8. You'll only need step 6-7-8 every vivaldi update.
      If you add a new script, you can directly add in application<last version number>\resources\hooks folder to use it, but it's better to add also in vivaldi\hooks subfolder, to have always ready for every update.
    9. If you see any strange artifacts, disable all script in vivaldi UI settings, and enable only the ones you need ;)

    It's more hard to explain than to do it xD


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