Starting the transition from Firefox to Vivaldi



  • It will be an interesting experiment. I have experienced a lot of BS problems with Firefox lately and got a little tired. I think perhaps Vivaldi has become mature enough to experiment with a browser change.

    I've followed and tested Vivaldi since it was Alpha and it is starting to look like a solid feature rich browser. I hate those minimalist browsers which are popular these days. They want it to look like you're browsing on a tablet even when you're using a PC.



  • @HaaEnn - I think that's part of the point. They want unity between the desktop and mobile experience.



  • @HaaEnn

    My first feature request after starting the transition:
    Often I got as much as 50-70 tabs open at once and the tabs becomes very small. If I was able to set a minimum size for tabs and instead was allowed to scroll to those tabs not visible on the screen, it would be great. Firefox got something like that.



  • @HaaEnn You can post request for such feature here. You can then keep checking back here once in a while, and post your request again, when a new version of the browser rolls out and a new feature requests thread starts. But before that, check the thread linked above, as a request for such feature has been made multiple times in the past and I'm not sure whether it was added there yet or not. You can also vote for other features that you'd like to see in future releases of Vivaldi.



  • @HaaEnn Very strange idea. I set 'Easygesture' to do 'ctrl F11' because one thing I love - apart from using a full featured browser - is the ability to put all of the rubbish away.

    Are you here to 'use a browser', or are you here to 'browse'.

    Those 'minimalist' browsers aren't too popular - they're good for some lighter jobs sometimes... Chrome and Firefox are real heavyweights that generally offer a clean interface.
    I quite like V's sidetabs, and sidebar, and a few other things... but I really LOVE the shortcut that says 'hide that crap' and the other shortcut that says 'just use all the screen'.

    It would be just as home on a tablet as it is on my UHDTV and computer monitor...

    Good browsers must be Chameleons - able to change and adapt to very different environments. Synchronisation will be a big one - we could use an option to sync across (I use Chrome on my iphone so that my books turn up at home - Vivaldi's getting left out).



  • @ben2talk FWIW, I used Firefox for years as you could do things with extensions like download You Tube videos, for personal use of course, and all sorts of options that weren't in other browsers.
    I used Opera as a main browser, which would do some of these, but seemed oddly lightweight by comparison.
    Then Opera embraced webkit & dulled down, no bookmarks, no home button, no commonsense either.
    And then came Vivaldi!
    The add ons that became more essential like Last Pass, Instapaper all work, with a rename I can install Opera extensions into a power browser, and Firefox is just a thing of the past.
    I wonder sometimes why Vivaldi is not used more often.
    Point of posting this is that I wondered about switching, when Vivaldi first came out, I was going to give it a couple of weeks, and then web browsing became a personal experience again.



  • @andyraisbeck It's certainly nice. BTW - downloadhelper (My previous hardlink to firefox) is now available as a chrome extension (IMO better than the few youtube downloaders I tried).

    I do find it hard to 'switch' however. I love the app-tabs; with Chromium I open a single application that is GMail, or IMDB (not a browser, though links open in browser windows).

    Vivaldi has it's work cut out to beat Chromium... and sadly when using it, it's hard to forget it's neither free nor open-source software.



  • I have now installed the following addons/extensions as replacement for functions I had on Firefox(some with addons):
    Session Buddy(Manager)
    Closed tabs(closed tabs list)
    ublock
    EditThisCookie
    Quick Image Search(Right Click on Image) on Google
    Zoom

    After having used Vivaldi for several days with any crashes, this is starting to look good. Only problem so far is the small tabs due to many tabs opened. Hope it will be fixed in future Vivaldi releases.



  • As I see it:

    The "Session Buddy" functionality can be, at least to some degree, done by pressing "F2" than enter "session" and select "save open tabs as session" (loading them works the same way) And, believing the rumors, there is some improvements for this function upcoming in the next few snapshots

    The "Closed Tabs" extension does the same work as the trashbin icon in the upper right corner (Or am I mistaken in this case?)



  • @zaibon I've actually never used the trash bin before for some reason. Perhaps because my earlier tests of Vivaldi wasn't extensive enough. OK, Closed Tabs will be deleted.

    Session Buddy saves sessions automatically, so I wll keep that one for now.



  • @HaaEnn said in Starting the transition from Firefox to Vivaldi:

    Session Buddy saves sessions automatically, so I wll keep that one for now.

    ?

    If you close Vivaldi it will save the session (of the last window), if you kill Vivaldi it will save the session (all windows) and if you click menu->File->Save open tabs as session it will also save all windows in a session.

    Why do you need an extension to do this? What am I missing here?



  • @mossman said in Starting the transition from Firefox to Vivaldi:

    What am I missing here?

    At least this feature from the extension description looks pretty nice to me:
    "Search open and saved tabs to quickly find what you're looking for."

    The rest of it is more or less already integrated in vivaldi though



  • @mossman: many users don't understand the difference between kill and close. You might clarify for the non-techies reading.



  • @Ayespy said in Starting the transition from Firefox to Vivaldi:

    @mossman: many users don't understand the difference between kill and close. You might clarify for the non-techies reading.

    Close: turn off the application in the standard way e.g. by clicking the "X" button in the corner of the window.

    Kill: ask the operating system (Windows, Linux, OS X...) to stop the program immediately - the program will quit without "shutting down nicely" (saving your data etc.)

    To kill an application (in Windows); open the task manager (either select from the menu after pressing CTRL-ALT-DELETE or right-clicking the task bar) then right-click the line for Vivaldi(*) and select "end task".

    (*) in Win10 there is one line for Vivaldi in the "apps" category - in older Windows versions you may have to find the main one from several lines

    I assume Linux users know how to kill a task - and I haven't used an Apple intensively since MacOS 9 but Uncle Google has an answer for OS X.

    Anyway - I realised there's a better solution if you want to close multiple open windows and open them at the next restart:
    menu -> file -> exit



  • @mossman: Menu->File->Exit is what I was thinking of. This terminates the process immediately and is what a lot of people mean when they say "kill."



  • @Ayespy said in Starting the transition from Firefox to Vivaldi:

    @mossman: Menu->File->Exit is what I was thinking of. This terminates the process immediately and is what a lot of people mean when they say "kill."

    If it's an option in a standard menu then that doesn't qualify as "kill"...

    "Kill" is, to my knowledge and experience, a standard IT term for terminating a process without politely asking it to stop itself first.


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