Opening New Window Delay / Lag



  • Is it just me, or Vivaldi stills have some delay (about 2-3 seconds max) when opening a new window? It has been happening since day one for me, and happened on both my computer and laptop. But I haven't seen this kind of topic in this "Vivaldi browser for Windwos" forum page recently, so I thought about posting it now. Windows 10 Education x64, Vivaldi 1.5 stable

    EDIT: and I'm pretty sure my hard drive is not the issue here, because I have a fast SSD on my laptop (Lenovo Yoga 910)



  • bump(?)

    Surely I'm not the only one experiencing this, no?


  • Moderator

    @alienscavenger - Mine takes about a second.



  • Sorry to chime in. Want to say "Me too" with op here, and I'm on Debian Linux.

    But... after turn off all my add-ons. Ayespy comment is right. Vivaldi open window faster, well not 1 second or longer, faster here. Maybe op could try that.

    Usual suspects: adblocker, userscripts manager, or any add-ons that scan page actively.



  • It's still not immediate, but latest 1.6 snapshots seem a bit faster creating new windows.



  • Hi, I have the same 2-3 seconds to open a new window on a single display system.
    Cant test on dual system at moment.
    Check download list, some user reported longer start time with long list of downloaded files.

    Opensuse Leap 42.1 x86_64
    CPU Intel T4200 4 GB
    GPU Intel GN 965
    xf86-video-intel 2.99.917-6.1
    Vivaldi latest snapshot

    Cheers, mib



  • Hi,

    Same ~3 seconds delay on opening new windows, even with all add-ons disabled.
    Download list is empty.

    Setup :
    Dual monitor, main(where vivaldi is):1920*1080, secondary:1280x1024)
    Windows 10 x64
    Vivaldi latest snapshot
    CPU : Intel i5-3550
    GPU : Intel HD2500
    SSD : Samsung 850 Pro
    RAM : 24GB (~13GB Free)



  • With a clean Vivaldi it takes 1 second. And takes 2-3 seconds on my PC, but if have 15 extensions.

    The slow start is known and Vivaldi developers will try to speedup.



  • It happens when I use the new feature -- dragging the tab out to create a new window. It takes about 2-3 seconds. I thought the tab was gone and I almost cried.



  • @alienscavenger said in Opening New Window Delay / Lag:

    bump(?)

    Surely I'm not the only one experiencing this, no?

    You're not the only one, no.



  • I also encounter the same problem. Nearly every operation which create a new window have some delay, such as starting up the Vivaldi, dragging the tab out or moving a tab to be a new window and so on.:slight_smile:


  • Moderator

    Vivaldi doesn't just have to start a new process to make a new window. It has to then build a new window the same way it would build a web page. This is not all that easy to streamline - but to the degree it can be streamlined, you may trust that the developers will do it.



  • @Ayespy said in Opening New Window Delay / Lag:

    Vivaldi doesn't just have to start a new process to make a new window. It has to then build a new window the same way it would build a web page. This is not all that easy to streamline - but to the degree it can be streamlined, you may trust that the developers will do it.

    Just out of curiosity, if you happen to know: how is Chrome/Chromium able to be so quick about it?


  • Moderator

    @rei67 - Chrome doesn't have an additional UI layer. It uses native elements to display the window, which are always loaded in memory from the the time the browser starts. If Vivaldi were to use the same strategy, many of the options it offers (and more that it will offer) would either be impossible, or would take five to six times as long to design and build. The very architecture which makes Vivaldi so flexible and feature-rich, also adds a layer of work to its operation.



  • The initial slowness to display a new window is very bad for the user experience. There should be at least a few ways to address the issue. Decoupling the chrome rendering from the native (empty) window creation should probably happen just to give the user an indication that CTRL+N worked. I'm also curious if a VM is used for the UI. If so, then pre-warming a VM instance could be an option as VMs tend not to be instantaneous to start.

    My hardware specs are: 1080gtx, intel 750 ssd (4x pcie), i7 6700k. I use ublock origin and tampermonkey extensions. On vivaldi 1.6.689.29 32bit currently.


  • Moderator

    @Gestalt - not sure how this would work. Vivaldi can't show any native Chromium feedback because its UI is completely disabled in Vivaldi. It's not like Vivaldi opens a Chromium window and then paints Vivaldi over it. There is no Chromium window to show. There is no window to show at all, until the Vivaldi window is built. If by VM you mean virtual machine, then no. Vivaldi does not use or initiate a VM.

    I'm sure there are efficiencies to be gained - but first Chromium and then Vivaldi would not be one of them.


  • Moderator

    @Gestalt - That said, it's very hard for me to measure, but on this machine right now, if I start a new window, it takes about one full second. If I enable "use native window" in the appearance settings, it appears the new window top bar appears in about .9 sec, followed by the Vivaldi window immediately thereafter.



  • @Ayespy said in Opening New Window Delay / Lag:

    @Gestalt - not sure how this would work. Vivaldi can't show any native Chromium feedback because its UI is completely disabled in Vivaldi. It's not like Vivaldi opens a Chromium window and then paints Vivaldi over it. There is no Chromium window to show. There is no window to show at all, until the Vivaldi window is built. If by VM you mean virtual machine, then no. Vivaldi does not use or initiate a VM.

    I'm sure there are efficiencies to be gained - but first Chromium and then Vivaldi would not be one of them.

    If I'm understanding @Gestalt correctly, what he means is that Vivaldi should create a blank window first immediately, and then populate the window with all the controls/rendering as soon as they're ready.

    I like that idea as well; at least then I'm not stuck wondering if I should hit Ctrl+N again, or if the tab I just pulled out vanished into the drag & drop ether.

    I'd imagine that, depending on the thread handling of the UI toolkit, it might require that the other windows are frozen in the meantime -- but even then, personally, I think it would be worth having that extra feedback.


  • Moderator

    @rei67 - There is such a thing as a Vivaldi window with no UI. You can select it in settings. Perhaps a step could be added to the "New Window" routine to start with such a window and then replace it with the real deal. Don' know if this would actually slow things down.



  • @rei67 said in Opening New Window Delay / Lag:

    @Ayespy said in Opening New Window Delay / Lag:

    @Gestalt - not sure how this would work. Vivaldi can't show any native Chromium feedback because its UI is completely disabled in Vivaldi. It's not like Vivaldi opens a Chromium window and then paints Vivaldi over it. There is no Chromium window to show. There is no window to show at all, until the Vivaldi window is built. If by VM you mean virtual machine, then no. Vivaldi does not use or initiate a VM.

    I'm sure there are efficiencies to be gained - but first Chromium and then Vivaldi would not be one of them.

    If I'm understanding @Gestalt correctly, what he means is that Vivaldi should create a blank window first immediately, and then populate the window with all the controls/rendering as soon as they're ready.

    I like that idea as well; at least then I'm not stuck wondering if I should hit Ctrl+N again, or if the tab I just pulled out vanished into the drag & drop ether.

    I'd imagine that, depending on the thread handling of the UI toolkit, it might require that the other windows are frozen in the meantime -- but even then, personally, I think it would be worth having that extra feedback.

    Yep you got it. "Chrome" in OS application development is a reference to the user interface. Creating an instance of a native window is usually done with a native abstraction layer such as SDL2 or making your own. Spawning the window and not blocking the rendering thread while vivaldi does it's time consuming work in a worker thread with a work complete callback is similar to what I do for my desktop applications. At the very least it can give the illusion of performance and is generally good practice.


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