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Video playback not consistently working as in Chromium



  • Playback of video is not working for me in all cases. For instance when I open http://finance.yahoo.com/news/us-competitiveness-project-harvard-business-school-hbs-michael-porter-030021739.html in Chromium playback works, when I open same site in Vivaldi playback is not working. I would expect that both behave the same given the same code base. What may be the issue here? I'm running openSUSE Leap 42.1



  • Hi, I am on Opensuse Leap 42 too and the video on the page is working for me on:

    Vivaldi 1.5.604.4 (Developer Build) dev (64-bit)
    Revision fdc79967e79a406ea69cba646531be8531e86a5f
    OS Linux
    Blink 537.36 (@fdc79967e79a406ea69cba646531be8531e86a5f)
    JavaScript V8 5.3.332.43
    Flash 23.0.0.162
    User Agent Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/53.0.2785.104 Safari/537.36 Vivaldi/1.5.604.4
    Command Line /usr/bin/vivaldi-snapshot –user-data-dir=/home/pepo/.config/vivaldi-snapshot --ppapi-flash-path=/opt/google/chrome/PepperFlash/libpepflashplayer.so --ppapi-flash-version=23.0.0.162 --always-authorize-plugins --disable-translate --window-depth=24 --x11-visual-id=32 --wm-user-time-ms=32438056 --flag-switches-begin --enable-experimental-canvas-features --enable-fast-unload --enable-gpu-rasterization --enable-offline-auto-reload-visible-only --enable-quic --ignore-gpu-blacklist --enable-lcd-text --show-saved-copy=primary --enable-features=StaleWhileRevalidate2 --flag-switches-end --disable-smooth-scrolling
    Executable Path /opt/vivaldi-snapshot/vivaldi-snapshot
    Profile Path /home/xxx/.config/vivaldi-snapshot/Default

    I use a copy of Widevine Content Decryption Module - Version: 1.0.123.456 from Chrome stable, it is not a symlink.
    May it help to get your system running.

    Cheers, mib



  • I don't have an additional repository active for Chromium. It is installed alongside Vivaldi, so any libraries needed by Chromium to play the given video is in place and therefor I expect Vivaldi to be able to play the video.



  • Using openSUSE Leap 42.1 too. I need to issue the following command after each upgrade:

    ln -sf /usr/lib64/chromium/libffmpeg.so /opt/vivaldi/lib/libffmpeg.so



  • Add the symlink is not solving my issue. I don't understand at all why video is not playing for a whole bunch of sites.


  • Moderator


  • Moderator

    You need a libffmpeg.so correspoding to the Vivaldi + Internal Chromium version.
    Use my update shell script from https://labs.gwendragon.de/blog/Web/Browser/Vivaldi/vivaldi-debian-install-libffmpeg-1-0-4-en



  • Why would I need an additional ffmpeg library? It completely blows my mind as to why Vivaldi is not able to play video normally with same libraries installed and Chromium can.

    Current agent:
    Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/53.0.2785.148 Safari/537.36 Vivaldi/1.4.589.38

    Chromium is at 53.0.2785.143

    If this ffmpeg is the issue, why does Vivaldi not provide this in the repository to install/ update along with the browser?

    To me it feels we're back to Opera 8 that had same issues with video and took until Opera 12 to be fixed… :S


  • Moderator

    No, you should not give anything about my advice. You don't need. Act as you like.

    @t160915:

    Why would I need an additional ffmpeg library? It completely blows my mind as to why Vivaldi is not able to play video normally with same libraries installed and Chromium can.

    Because installed Chromium version and Vivaldi version may differ, which may result in problems with codecs. And not all distributions have the correct chromium codecs package in their repository.

    @t160915:

    If this ffmpeg is the issue, why does Vivaldi not provide this in the repository to install/ update along with the browser?

    No, libffmpeg is not freeware!
    The lib for enhanced video is not included because of license problems and fees Vivaldi would be forced to pay for.

    @t160915:

    To me it feels we're back to Opera 8 that had same issues with video and took until Opera 12 to be fixed…

    If you pay regular fees for a browser you may get codecs implemented.



  • t160915 - I agree with your points. It seems like an important issue. The video link you gave runs ok for me (Ubuntu Mate, Vivaldi 1.4.589.38) and I certainly haven't run any shell scripts (whatever they are). I do have Chromium and Firefox loaded, and have had Opera, Midori etc (still looking for a reliable, customisable browser) - I don't know if that makes any difference.
    As a newbie, Gwen-Dragon's last post does come across to me as being a little "prickly" - and which browsers do you have to pay regular fees for??


  • Moderator

    @Algie:

    As a newbie, Gwen-Dragon's last post does come across to me as being a little "prickly" - and which browsers do you have to pay regular fees for??

    Browser developing companies have to pay if they use protected compression (like MPEG) and ffmpeg libraries in their products.
    If the user does not pay, the company has to.



  • Browser developing companies have to pay if they use protected compression (like MPEG) and ffmpeg libraries in their products.
    If the user does not pay, the company has to.

    Ok, thanks. I get the first point - I just wondered which browsers the user has to pay for?



  • @karlmistelberger:

    Using openSUSE Leap 42.1 too. I need to issue the following command after each upgrade:

    ln -sf /usr/lib64/chromium/libffmpeg.so /opt/vivaldi/lib/libffmpeg.so

    I'm running 2 systems. I installed the libffmpeg by breaking the depency to chromium. Added the symlink as you suggested and it works now as expected.

    Thanks! :cheer:


  • Vivaldi Team

    @t160915 said in Video playback not consistently working as in Chromium:

    Why would I need an additional ffmpeg library? It completely blows my mind as to why Vivaldi is not able to play video normally with same libraries installed and Chromium can.

    The most common HTML5 audio and video codecs (H.264, MP3 and AAC) are what I would call "proprietary" because they are patented and hence require various licenses to distribute software that can decode them. Each user costs the person distributing the software money. To an extent, these costs reduce as you gain more users (e.g. the licensor for H.264 gives discounts over certain numbers of users and you eventually hit a cap where these is no additional cost) but at our current size it is not viable for us to pay for a license for all our users and still fund the development of the browser.

    One day we hope to be big enough to pick up the cost of this but consider that at this stage Opera is still a far bigger company than we are and yet they also have to use third party libs to play "proprietary" media, rather than licensing them. The same is also true for Mozilla who are even bigger than Opera. They do use openh264 for video but AAC is decoded via libs provided via the operating system.

    Ubuntu does provide codecs capable of decoding "proprietary" media via packages such as chromium-codecs-ffmpeg-extra. I am not sure how they are able to do this but I would assume that they either paid for the licenses (whilst they have a free OS, their profits might be higher due to their wider range of products and services) or perhaps they have some reason why they believe that they do need to pay for licenses. That is for them and their lawyers to decide.

    On other distros like openSUSE, you will not find h264 capable libs in the main repositories but third party repositories like Packman may include them. The legalities of this is for the owners of those repos and any lawyers advising them to decide. Certainly in Europe software patents are not legally binding. I am not a lawyer and cannot give legal advice but I could speculate that perhaps if libs are built and distributed in Europe by a European only organisation they can get away with it.


  • Vivaldi Team

    @karlmistelberger I would remove any such workaround as it can cause a problem in the future. We now have a fix for openSUSE and will use the lib directly if it is suitable and already on your system in the normal package location.


  • Vivaldi Team

    @Algie said in Video playback not consistently working as in Chromium:

    Ok, thanks. I get the first point - I just wondered which browsers the user has to pay for?

    It is not the user who has to pay but the software distributor (i.e. Vivaldi, Opera, Firefox, etc.). If the fees are too high, which they are unless you have many millions of users then it is not economicaly viable for the browser vendor to bundle libs that support proprietary codecs directly. This is why Vivaldi, Opera and Firefox all use libs provided by the OS or other packages to support these formats. Apple, Google, Microsoft have enough users and own some of the related patents themselves so can get good licensing deals and pick up the cost of this for their users.



  • @ruario Thank you for your response clearly outlining of the issue. Can you tell me what the fix for openSUSE is, because with Leap 42.2 playback has stopped again. As you advised I did not add a symlink again, but not able to play video.


  • Vivaldi Team

    @t160915 From reading this bug report I see that openSUSE has changed their Chromium again and now uses the system ffmpeg instead of custom one for Chromium and thus the chromium-codecs package was deleted from the Packman repositories. This was the package we were using to provide Vivaldi with proprietary media support, thus it is broken again.

    Looks like we will need another fix. :(

    In the mean time the latest-proprietary-media.sh shell script I provide with my notes should get you proprietary media. It will fetch the Ubuntu package and extract out the lib that is used placing it in a location where Vivaldi can find it.


  • Vivaldi Team

    @Gwen-Dragon said in Video playback not consistently working as in Chromium:

    No, libffmpeg is not freeware!

    Actually, it is freeware. In its source there is support for proprietary media but you can choose to compile that in or not.

    If you compile it without support for proprietary media, you have a lib that pretty much anyone has the right to share and distribute.

    However if you compile with support for proprietary media, you have a lib that might not be distributable. However this entirely depends on if software patents are valid in the distributor's country and/or they have paid for a licenses. The code itself is open.

    The fact that you can potentially build a lib that you might not have the right to distribute does not change ffmpeg status as an open/free project. Anyone can contribute to the project, anyone can review the code, anyone can build a lib for his/her own private usage. It is the very definition of a free and open project IMHO.


  • Moderator

    @ruario free was meant by me as: can be used for commercial and non-commercial products.
    I read in FFmpeg License

    FFmpeg is licensed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) version 2.1 or later.

    and

    Note that FFmpeg is not available under any other licensing terms, especially not proprietary/commercial ones, not even in exchange for payment.

    GPL excludes commercial use as i know. But may be i interpreted the license incorrect.


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