Does Microsoft want Windows 10 to be successful?


  • Banned

    Microsoft was targeting over 1 billion updates to Windows 10. But after a year they accomplished like 20% of the plan. I've got Windows Vista on my notebook. Why I don't get a free upgrade? It's not much different to Windows 7. And they would get some more percentage for Windows 10. Microsoft told me that Vista is the new futureproof operating system. But it wasn't. Microsoft promised me a lot - but lied. It was quickly replaced. Windows 7 turned out to be what Vista was supposed to be. And Microsoft is trying to erease any memory of Vista (many apps are written specifically to not work on Vista, like for example Blink, so I won't be able to have Vivaldi on Vista). And now Windows 7 users are also getting a free upgrade to Windows 10... But not everyone. My aunt has notebook with Windows 8.1. She was irritated with constant adds about free update - she didn't want it (I set up her machine really well, even managed to install some stuff needed for work that their IT guy couldn't). But I finally convinced her shortly before deadline. I set up everything and she just needed to update to Windows 10 on startup. But she skipped install because she wasn't sure. The update was downloaded and I reminded her later to update because the deadline was closing. But instead of upgrading to Windows 10 updater decided to download all the files again (on her slow net it took almost the whole day). And then, after finishing download, it told there was some bug and couldn't install. And offered to retry - again downloading all the files. It ended a few minutes after deadline :/ And now she can't update to Windows 10. Does Microsoft want her to update to Windows 10? It was bombarding her with adds, but when she finally decided to update it didn't. There's apparently some way to get Windows 10 update by pretending to be a person with disability but they want to close it. So do they want those installs or not? I've upgrade one computer to Windows 10 a few months after update was available (I was in no hurry). And it felt to me like unfinished beta - not like a proper new system. I've got bluescreen just day after update. And I'm still feeling like using beta - with many bugs and missing features. For example with WiFi - it barely works. And some settings are in new UI windows, some in older, and some completely hidden from the user. It's so irritating. Is it on purpose? I wonder when they remove GodMode... Editing Register will be limited too. I think it's on purpose so everybody will have identical system with same dumb settings. And only apps approved by Microsoft. I did a clean install of Windows 10. And I wanted to install one app. But couldn't. Windows told me it's not compatible. And that's it. It forbid me from installing it and I couldn't do anything about it. But I haven't given up. I just unpacked the installation files using some program found on the net. And put everything in its place. A manual installation. And guess what? Everything is working fine without a problem. It's fully compatible with Windows 10. But it really worries me. What if Microsoft decides next that Vivaldi is incompatible? Or any app not bought from their store? Jailbreaking Windows? I don't have control of my OS anymore (well, it's been disappearing for some time already, but the future is really grim). But maybe it was a blessing in disguise. Maybe I was about to put my aunt on a landmine. I hear that anniversary update is removing another features from Windows 10 and increasing telemetry. Some say that it's a fair trade - free upgrade for invigilation. But what about people who have to buy Windows 10? The free upgrade offer has ended - and it was only for those who already had Windows 7 or 8. Now you have to pay a hefty price for a spyware, with possibility of monthly subscription in the future. And it's tied to your computer, so when you upgrade to new one you have to buy a new license. I'm starting to evaluate a Linux as my main system. For browsing web, watching media, office work - there are Linux alternatives. The only problem are games, but I don't have time for them now. Are there any good firewalls for Linux? (because despite some claims Linux is not virusproof) But Microsoft is trying to kill Linux with UEFI... And about promised constant updates. My brother has a notebook with Windows 10 - for unknow reasons Anniversary Update has failed. But after he saw what anniversary update did to my computer he is happy that it failed.



  • I've pretty much had enough of a lot of Microsoft BS that I've had to put up with as well. W10 is fast on my computer, but I hate it's inconsistent, ugly UI which isn't much better than W8/8.1. I hate the options, the file explorer and Quick Access, the 2 control panels, the telemetry taking up bandwidth I would like to use for browsing, and the processes that run in the background despite me turning them off. It was pretty much the last straw for me when a Windows update corrupted my C: Drive. I restored it with a system image file, then installed the update again. The next day, it wouldn't boot up again due to a corrupted C: Drive. I put a USB in there with W10 to reinstall a fresh copy, but seriously, an update that came from Microsoft themselves, made my computer unable to boot up the next day.

    But then I got Linux Mint Cinnamon 18 on a live USB, and installed it alongside Windows 10, so I can dual-boot and switch whenever I need to. Honestly, I'm still trying to set things up completely on Mint, like the partitions and whatnot, but other than that, I love it! It's just so much simpler and stabler, and more solid of an OS than Windows. I was considering using Ubuntu, but I saw how Unity 8 is gonna look like, and I was not pleased.

    I also want to get a Mac someday, but in the meantime, while I have my Windows laptop, I can put Linux on it, set it up, and get ready to use it all the time, because Mint's UI is pretty, clean, and consistent. It's file manager is easy to use, useful, and actually ORGANIZED. Linux only uses a registry for it's core OS, meaning no application you install actually edits the registry in any way. That means the registry doesn't get filled and added, edited by what you install, and doesn't get bloated like on Windows. There's no defragging your hard drive in Linux, because they actually organize the file system and put everything in the right place to begin with. I can easily uninstall things and take away the bloat from my computer with "sudo apt autoremove" as well as BleachBit, which is pretty good for removing unneeded files. Mint's applications are very nice, light, and useful. I feel more compelled to use them, whereas on Windows, I don't use ANY metro apps, and they suck anyway. I like using the image viewer, document viewer, and Banshee is pretty good too. They now have X-Apps in the version 18, which is awesome.

    Basically, things just work as they should most of the time, and there are no instabilities, or at least very few compared to Windows. "It just works", the Mac motto, can pretty much apply to Linux as well, unlike Windows, which you have to go out of your way to make things work. On Linux, I can pretty much just use my apps and they just work, and it's simple. I'm not going out of my way to make things work, though I can configure things if I want to.

    It's not perfect, but damn, at least there's hope, and at least it's not a mediocre product like everything Microsoft seems to come out with is. The nice thing about Mac and some Linux distros like Mint is that they have the core concept from it's inception and improve upon it with each version release. Windows, as you've seen in the transitions from many versions like from 7 to 8, and then to 10, radically changes things with each version, sometimes in ways that makes no sense, usually in ways that makes it worse, and for the sake of change, which is unnecessary. Who the hell liked live tiles when the start menu disappeared??? Seriously?!? And it took them a long time to fix that when they came out with W10, but then a different problem occurred when they still shoved in live tiles in the start menu, along with 2 versions of the control panel that do different things and make you have to navigate both, and with the new(?) Quick Access in the File Explorer that makes the list look like everything has a duplicate. Things are all over the place, they don't seem to know what they want, and I just hate the whole square, super flat look in general. Flat is nice, but this was taken too far.

    I know not everyone cares about privacy problems with W10, but it just takes up more resources. Cortana, despite me disabling her, is still in my task manager, and the Photos app, a metro app which I've never used, always runs in my task manager despite me disabling it to not run in the background. I get so irritated with this crap sometimes.

    And lets talk about not just W10, but other MS products as well. I use to use Hotmail. I synced it with Gmail, and used Hotmail on my Gmail webmail because Gmail worked better. Suddenly, I think MS changed the servers or something, and it stopped sending my Hotmail emails to my Gmail. I then went to their website, and they changed it to Outlook, with the metro theme, and it's so disgustingly disorganized, and it doesn't remember or even listen to my settings that I used for it to send emails to different folders and just clutters my main inbox folder like crazy. I didn't even like the way it displayed emails when I read them, and the way you reply, and all the buttons placement needed for them. It was a total nightmare. I just switched to my Gmail completely, and I haven't used my Hotmail since then. This was about 3 years ago.

    Then there's the Edge browser. Seriously, they had the opportunity to come out with a cool, new branding for this new browser that was "so much better than IE", and then they make the logo a friggin' E! An E!!! It looked just like the IE logo, that it made it hard to brand it differently, a stupid marketing move. And the browser isn't that great anyway.

    Honestly, it seems that everything that comes out of Microsoft, has a history of just being very mediocre products to use. They don't give a crap, and don't listen to what didn't work and learn from it. At least in Linux, every improvement is rewarded. At Microsoft, it's only approved into the code if it profits them. At Apple, when Steve Jobs ran it, software was made pristine, solid and intuitive for the most part.

    It's sad that MS holds this monopoly, because I think it's really holding the industry back. The only thing it's better for now is gaming, but once OpenGL, the platform Linux and Mac use, catches up to DirectX, and SteamOS/Steam for Linux and Mac's library catches up, I hope it'll make it an even playing field.

    Anyway, let me help you out with transitioning to Linux. On Firewall, I don't know if this applies to all distros, but in Linux Mint Cinnamon, it was simply a matter of going into the settings > Firewall and then turning the on switch. Boom. It's turned on. Didn't have to do more than that, at least an average user won't have to do more than that.

    How exactly do you figure Microsoft is trying to kill Linux with UEFI? I'm sure it's possible, I'm just wondering where you heard that. I know MS is trying to block Linux from succeeding in gaming by enforcing DirectX support. But with UEFI, I thought it was just something more advanced than BIOS, but let me know. I don't know if MS were the ones who created UEFI in the first place, but I don't think so.

    And before you do go installing Linux either over or alongside Windows, make sure you create a bootable live USB to test it out, and see if you like it, and if it works on your hardware. Try out more than one distro if you can. I tried a bunch of the popular ones before settling on Mint Cinnamon.

    To live boot, simply go to the website of the Linux distro you want to dry out, download the 32-bit or 64-bit ISO of the distro, insert your USB and then use a live USB creator to create a bootable drive with your USB. My USB creator of choice is Universal USB Installer: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/universal-usb-installer-easy-as-1-2-3/

    Then, go to your "advanced options" in the settings(if it's not that, then it's some other option deep in the settings in W8. I'm on W10, so I don't remember how it is on W8), then go to Recovery > Advanced Startup, and select the option to boot from USB. You're now testing your selected distro, so play around with it and see if you like it. If you do, you can install it from there. There are instructions on the internet to partition your drives to make some space for Linux if you want to dual-boot, or if you want to completely remove Windows for Linux.



  • I used Windows 10 for exactly 1 year - from July 29 2015 till July 30 2016 when the Anniversary update was released.

    This update was so horrible it made me go back to Windows 7.

    With the anniversary update you can't turn off the lock screen picture anymore.

    You have to install tools that turn off snooping in Windows 10 and even if you do, you still don't know if it's really turned off or it just says so.

    Windows 10 is one huge public beta that Microsoft successfully masked as a final product, got millions of gunea pigs to test it for them and do their work for free.
    Windows 10 is ugly and the UI is very inconsistent. The way elements work is a complete mess and this "metro" language they made is really fragile and easy to break. I can't count the times the taskbar elements (such as start menu, tray, volume, network) stopped working on me and not even Power Shell could help me and I had to reinstall.

    Not to mention that the volume control on the Windows 10 taskbar has less features than the one from Windows 7 - where you can find Volume Mixer easily, as for Windows 10, you have to take a wild guess and right click.

    Windows 7 had custom colors, in Windows 10, you can launch "color control" but anything beyond the allowed colors turns into blue. The Taskbar, start menu and window bar in Windows 10 are all in different shades which only works when you have transparency on.

    Not to mention that in Windows 10 even if you turn off "transparency" (Aero), it's still running, only it's replaced by a solid color on top. I once found that out when my PC was under stress and was closing a game and redrawing the UI, then I saw it was first loading Aero and then putting a solid color on top.

    When the computer boots up, it shows a white on blue message "Resuming from Hibernation" meaning that Windows 10 never shuts down properly and "resuming from hibernation" is their sneaky method to lie that it boots faster. Yeah, it boots faster, but it never shuts down properly and people are basically having the same session for months despite shutting down on a daily basis.

    Simply put Windows 10 is an extended beta of Windows 8. It's a horrible joke and a garbage of an OS, it shouldn't cost money, in fact Microsoft should be paying people to use their brain fart garbage.

    Sadly Windows 7 is their last coherent and working OS and it will be the new XP for about 10 more years.



  • @LAMBDA471:

    You have to install tools that turn off snooping in Windows 10 and even if you do, you still don't know if it's really turned off or it just says so.

    That's true only for home/pro version which are free of charge, and anyway can be turned off easily in many ways

    Windows 10 is one huge public beta that Microsoft successfully masked as a final product, got millions of gunea pigs to test it for them and do their work for free.

    Frankly W10 is way less beta than most of the early versions of windows since win1.

    Sure it's now a rolling release, an approach that has many advantages but also many disadvantages, exactly as happens in the linux world if you look at Arch linux approach V.S. the Ubuntu approach

    Anyway there are the LTSB versions if you prefer the stability over the novelties.

    Windows 10 is ugly and the UI is very inconsistent.

    The UI is pretty consistent, just you have to deal with two OSes at the same time, they are still transitioning, but if you don't like/don't use/don't have the metro apps, there isn't really any disadvantage over W7, just advantages.

    Not to mention that the volume control on the Windows 10 taskbar has less features than the one from Windows 7 - where you can find Volume Mixer easily, as for Windows 10, you have to take a wild guess and right click.

    You can easily enable the old style volume control

    Windows 7 had custom colors, in Windows 10, you can launch "color control" but anything beyond the allowed colors turns into blue. The Taskbar, start menu and window bar in Windows 10 are all in different shades which only works when you have transparency on.

    There are a zillion of utilities to set up the colors as you like

    Not to mention that in Windows 10 even if you turn off "transparency" (Aero), it's still running, only it's replaced by a solid color on top. I once found that out when my PC was under stress and was closing a game and redrawing the UI, then I saw it was first loading Aero and then putting a solid color on top.

    That's a good thing, the graphic stack evolved and there isn't any advantage in keeping it disabled, the same happened almost always in W7

    When the computer boots up, it shows a white on blue message "Resuming from Hibernation" meaning that Windows 10 never shuts down properly and "resuming from hibernation" is their sneaky method to lie that it boots faster. Yeah, it boots faster, but it never shuts down properly and people are basically having the same session for months despite shutting down on a daily basis.

    You're talking about the hybrid boot, not hibernation. It can be easily disabled if you like, and W10 will still boot way faster than W7

    In short we can discuss a lot of W10 problems, but would be better to talk about real ones.





  • @The_Solutor:

    That's true only for home/pro version which are free of charge, and anyway can be turned off easily in many ways
    **
    yeah, i keep hearing people repating the same old same old "its only disabled on home pro, but as long as you have enterprise you can turn it off"
    just because it says you can, do you really know if its turned off or not, and even if you use the default way in enterprise, the regedit and about 3 different 3rd party tools that claim to do the same, you still dont know if it works or not - you have to use tools that monitor the network activity of every process and child process, most likely resorting to third party software AGAIN, because the built-in by Microsoft is always as basic as it can get - shiny graphs but complete lack of functionality and vague idea of what you're actually doing

    at least i have to give them credit for the new task manager, that when you use the small mode, and click "end process" it ends the process immediately compared to the one in Windows 7 and the fact that in Details it shows the icons of the processes making it easier to identify them

    **

    Sure it's now a rolling release, an approach that has many advantages but also many disadvantages, exactly as happens in the linux world if you look at Arch linux approach V.S. the Ubuntu approach

    Anyway there are the LTSB versions if you prefer the stability over the novelties.

    **i can't comment on Linux since ive only used Ubuntu and Mint for about a month and all i remember was that Ubuntu sometimes changed software with each update, meaning that in April update it might have Nautilus as the file explorer, but in the October update they decide to swap it for Dolphin or whatever, which was a lot of bull, unless they have a valid reason such as the software being abandoned or something

    **

    The UI is pretty consistent, just you have to deal with two OSes at the same time, they are still transitioning, but if you don't like/don't use/don't have the metro apps, there isn't really any disadvantage over W7, just advantages.
    Frankly W10 is way less beta than most of the early versions of windows since win1.
    **
    which is exactly why Windows 10 feels like a beta - they should have ironed this out in their internal builds, not ship a Settings pane that suddenly stops working, because of the squishy language its build on and suddenly you don't have access to the "control panel" and have to reinstall completely or hope that repair/reset will work

    Windows Vista was really a transition from Windows XP, when it was codenamed Longhorn and the transition was huge, looking at screnshots of builds and trying some myself, but when Vista came out, the UI was coherent and felt finished, like it's own thing, I only used it for a few months on a brand new laptop, but it was 2009 and that's when Windows 7 came out so I quickly switched to it and don't know the details but from what I remember Vista was solid, some were complaining that it was lousy under the hood, but to the end user that probably makes little to no difference

    as for Windows 10, from my personal experience and separate research, it's improved under the hood greatly, but at the cost of a lousy UI that isn't something that says "Microsoft" it says "garage drunkard designer/programmer wannabee"**

    You can easily enable the old style volume control
    There are a zillion of utilities to set up the colors as you like

    **
    what's then the point of having a new one if users will be inclined to revert back to the old one? like the new Photo Viewer, which takes forever to load and open the image you are trying to view, and you end up having to install a third part software like IrfanView or Nomacs, because even if enabling the old one is possible, it can't play .GIF files and uses IE or whatever default browser is set
    **

    **in Linux you had websites that had themes made by users and in order to get them to work you didn't have to do much but download them and enable them, in Windows you have to isntall UXtheme patcher or something even "fatter" (resource-wise) like WindowBlinds

    i frankly find it unwise after so many years to be forcing users to pay hundreds of dollars for software that you can't natively customize, but have to resort to third party software in order to do so, yeah someone might say that locking things up enforces stability, but i believe that if you pay for something, you should be able to do everything with it, sort of like a buy-to-play game with a free edititon with as little features as possible and a premium edition with all possible features included, in fact windows should be like this - free and premium version with the free one so limited that no one should be able to sideload anything beyond what comes out of the box

    but that's theorizing and another topic**

    That's a good thing, the graphic stack evolved and there isn't any advantage in keeping it disabled, the same happened almost always in W7

    **I'm pretty sure it got completely turned off in Windows 7 as there is a visual transition when you change from Basic to Aero themes and having Aero turned off in Aero themes, makes the transition instantaneous
    and even if that didn't work you could always switch to Classic, which uses the least resources and frankly looks better than whatever fancy eye candy UI any developer has come up with, be it KDE or Gnome or whatever Mac is using, although I find KDE 3 and Gnome 2 on par with visual appeal with Windows Classic
    **

    You're talking about the hybrid boot, not hibernation. It can be easily disabled if you like, and W10 will still boot way faster than W7

    **for me they boot equally, neither is faster nor slower and i don't really know if there is any benefit to hybrid boot
    **

    In short we can discuss a lot of W10 problems, but would be better to talk about real ones.

    **you forgot to comment on the lock screen and the ordeals one has to go through since the Anniversary update in order to get it turned off
    i'm pretty sure those problems are quite real

    if every version of windows is going be hit-and-miss, it would be logical to stick to something solid like Windows 7 and wait out on all the betas that are being advertised as finished products

    this only goes to show how incomplete Windows 10 is and instead of getting better, it gets worse, maybe in 10 years it will be on the level of Windows 7, but we will have to wait first**



  • @LAMBDA471:

    yeah, i keep hearing people repating the same old same old "its only disabled on home pro, but as long as you have enterprise you can turn it off"

    Usually who talks this way about W7 forgets that W7 is still constantly updated, and it's already present telemetry keeps getting closer to W10 one. In short this is an argument. They are the same.

    i can't comment on Linux since ive only used Ubuntu and Mint for about a month and all i remember was that Ubuntu sometimes changed software with each update, meaning that in April update it might have Nautilus as the file explorer, but in the October update they decide to swap it for Dolphin or whatever, which was a lot of bull, unless they have a valid reason such as the software being abandoned or something

    Both Ubuntu and Ubuntuish distros are way more stable than Arch (stable intended as not changing), there is the ubuntu LTS which is more stable and is intended mainly for mission critical purposes rather than a standard desktop platform. Exactly like W10 LTSB you can use it as a plain desktop OS if you prefer the stability over the bleading edge SW

    which is exactly why Windows 10 feels like a beta

    This has little to do with feeling like a beta. Vista felt like a beta, Win2K felt like a beta, Win 8 felt like a beta.

    An OS feels like a beta when it lacks important features, when it has evident regressions over the older releases and so on.

    Surely is not an icon you don't like that makes a good OS "betaish"

    what's then the point of having a new one if users will be inclined to revert back to the old one?

    You can't forget that newer generations of users have a background which is way different than ours. W10 can't be a clone of W7, like Vivaldi can't be a clone of Opera. As long as you have a choice what's the problem if a detail like that is replaced?

    Blame MS when forcefully removes something like the start menu on W8, not because an optional choce

    for me they boot equally, neither is faster nor slower and i don't really know if there is any benefit to hybrid boot

    My 6 years old PC boots (on SSD) in 25 seconds using W7, and in 12 using W10 W/O the hybrid boot enabled.

    If you enable it the timing is reduced to 6/7 seconds.

    That scenario is mostly unchanged in any PC I've tested (and they are a lot), no matter the age or the storage.

    Saying that there isn't any change is just unfair, to say the best.

    if every version of windows is going be hit-and-miss, it would be logical to stick to something solid like Windows 7 and wait out on all the betas that are being advertised as finished products

    W10 is pretty solid, We can discuss for hours about the privacy and other relevant concerns, but saying that W10 isn't solid is just a lie. Surely I faced more crashes on W7 than on W10 even taking in account the early beta.



  • @The_Solutor:

    Usually who talks this way about W7 forgets that W7 is still constantly updated, and it's already present telemetry keeps getting closer to W10 one. In short this is an argument. They are the same.

    This has little to do with feeling like a beta. Vista felt like a beta, Win2K felt like a beta, Win 8 felt like a beta.

    An OS feels like a beta when it lacks important features, when it has evident regressions over the older releases and so on.

    Surely is not an icon you don't like that makes a good OS "betaish"

    You can't forget that newer generations of users have a background which is way different than ours. W10 can't be a clone of W7, like Vivaldi can't be a clone of Opera. As long as you have a choice what's the problem if a detail like that is replaced?

    Blame MS when forcefully removes something like the start menu on W8, not because an optional choce

    My 6 years old PC boots (on SSD) in 25 seconds using W7, and in 12 using W10 W/O the hybrid boot enabled.

    If you enable it the timing is reduced to 6/7 seconds.

    That scenario is mostly unchanged in any PC I've tested (and they are a lot), no matter the age or the storage.

    Saying that there isn't any change is just unfair, to say the best.

    W10 is pretty solid, We can discuss for hours about the privacy and other relevant concerns, but saying that W10 isn't solid is just a lie. Surely I faced more crashes on W7 than on W10 even taking in account the early beta.

    I can't argue about updates and telemetry being added into Windows 7 as well. They even changed how the updating system works so it's now like in Windows 10. There are posts about which updates to look out for that contain telemetry and they can be uninstalled and hidden for all I care. I can't say I've done it, though, it's too much of a hassle.

    I'm saying Windows 10 feels like a beta, because of the many changes they are making and the current state policies, dependencies and UI are in.
    Cortana is preinstalled, so are a few other apps. Cortana works as an assistant in countries where it's supported, it also works as the search function for the Start Menu and everything else in Windows 10. But I don't want an assistant on my PC. I just want it to be like before. I don't want an useless App Store that is empty and keeps dying.

    So what are you going to do about it, blockhead? - I force delete all of the preinstalled apps!
    But what happens after you restart Windows 10? - I can't even boot to desktop anymore! :D
    Good for you, blockhead, you fixed it! - IKR!

    I'm calling Windows 10 a beta, because they are forcing me to have things that I don't need, nor I can completely disable.
    At least in Windows 7 if you disable the "Windows Search" service, that doesn't mean you can't search anymore, it means indexing is disabled and you can still search, but slower.
    I can't wrap my head around why should I be OK with the fact that I'm supposed to put up with having programs that I don't need and I can't remove, and yet they are being shoved into my face time and time again. Sure, there a lot of programs in previous versions, like all the funny exe files in System32 that you can find, they are required for certain parts of Windows to function properly, but they are never shoved into your face, I bet most casual users don't even know about their existence, nor they should. But with things like Cortana, the Image Viewer, Calculator, Store… you can't help but notice those, even if you don't need them. Heck, even Store is pinned by default into the taskbbar and the Cortana ring is also there.

    I believe I originally mentioned the Lock Screen and how it's no longer possible to disable it after the Anniversaty Update.

    This is also a reason why I'm disappointed with Windows 10. I don't like this lock screen, I don't need it. I don't have a password on my desktop and I expect when I press the power button and be back after 5 minutes, to see my desktop, not sitting at a stupid shutter with a "motivational" picture of a sunrise waiting for me to either press Enter, click it or slide it up with the mouse so it can boot to desktop.
    It's inconvenient, stupid, annoying and illogical. It's just some stupid eye candy.

    You have probably heard of the Ninja cat mascot for Windows 10. In case you haven't here's a picture for you:

    I can't understand how can Microsoft be hiring people and wasting time and resources coming up with this garbage and yet they can't get their sh-t together and make Windows 10 be the professional, sleek and awesome OS they want it to be.
    Even reading tweets about the people in charge of announcing Insider releases, they seem to hire some self-proclaimed comedians that think are being funny by writing witty tweets, as if "it makes them morre down-to-earth and closer to us plebeians".

    Even Skype is suffering from this - it's been updated with more emoticons and whatever for the past years than features.

    Microsoft in my opinion are avoiding their work and responsibility as the number 1 desktop OS. I'm starting to think they're tripping on power, thinking they can get away with anything. I bet they can even release an intentional joke of an OS, just to see how will people respond to it, and I bet people will eventually come to terms with that too.

    That aside. What about the Control Panel x Settings? I'm sure Microsoft are big, wealthy and resourceful enough company to be able to migrate everything from the Control Panel into settings by the time Windows 10 hits commercial beta stage. So why haven't they done that?

    This is what means a "beta" to me - something that feels unfinished, like there can be more to it. When I first saw the CP and Settings, I immediately knew that eventually CP will be deprecated in favor of Settings, but is this really a good impression to have of a new OS?

    I guess I have to agree with you about newer generations and how this is aimed for them, but older generations still aren't dead! They should be kept in mind, until at least they reach 50 or so :D

    And last of all, I don't have a SSD, I have but one HDD that's 500GB and all my stuff are on it - C:\ is for Windows, D:\ is for everything else, so when I reinstall I can only format C:\ and keep everything else I have on D:

    So this hybrid boot thing doesn't do much for me, it's definitely intended for SSDs. And I would only get an SSD if it can be 1TB, but that's super expensive, so I will be holding off on that for a while.



  • @LAMBDA471:

    I'm saying Windows 10 feels like a beta, because of the many changes they are making and the current state policies, dependencies and UI are in.

    Being beta and having changes are two different matters, mixing them together isn't helpful

    Cortana is preinstalled, so are a few other apps. Cortana works as an assistant in countries where it's supported, it also works as the search function for the Start Menu and everything else in Windows 10. But I don't want an assistant on my PC. I just want it to be like before. I don't want an useless App Store that is empty and keeps dying.

    Just use MSMG or a similar program to remove the appx, Cortana, the telemetry and so on from the ISO. Pretty easy.

    Really seem that your problem is not W10 itself but the lack of information about it.

    At least in Windows 7 if you disable the "Windows Search" service, that doesn't mean you can't search anymore, it means indexing is disabled and you can still search, but slower.
    I can't wrap my head around why should I be OK with the fact that I'm supposed to put up with having programs that I don't need and I can't remove, and yet they are being shoved into my face time and time again. Sure, there a lot of programs in previous versions, like all the funny exe files in System32 that you can find, they are required for certain parts of Windows to function properly, but they are never shoved into your face, I bet most casual users don't even know about their existence, nor they should. But with things like Cortana, the Image Viewer, Calculator, Store… you can't help but notice those, even if you don't need them. Heck, even Store is pinned by default into the taskbbar and the Cortana ring is also there.

    See above, remove cortana and search2, install Classic Shell and your start menu and its search feature will work exactly like on W7

    I believe I originally mentioned the Lock Screen and how it's no longer possible to disable it after the Anniversaty Update.

    Officially.

    Just use winaerotweaker or a similar free tool to disable it with one click

    It's just some stupid eye candy.

    No it isn't.

    It's a way to push ads and messages on free versions. You may don't like them, but given you didn't pay for the "razor" MS try to push the "blades". Unpleasant but understandable. Not different from the way internet works: you get the free contents, but you have to face the ADS.

    Then you can block the ADS. Think to the lock screen the same way you think to a browser and you'll be fine

    I can't understand how can Microsoft be hiring people and wasting time and resources coming up with this garbage and yet they can't get their sh-t together and make Windows 10 be the professional, sleek and awesome OS they want it to be.
    Even reading tweets about the people in charge of announcing Insider releases, they seem to hire some self-proclaimed comedians that think are being funny by writing witty tweets, as if "it makes them morre down-to-earth and closer to us plebeians".

    Even Skype is suffering from this - it's been updated with more emoticons and whatever for the past years than features.

    Microsoft in my opinion are avoiding their work and responsibility as the number 1 desktop OS. I'm starting to think they're tripping on power, thinking they can get away with anything. I bet they can even release an intentional joke of an OS, just to see how will people respond to it, and I bet people will eventually come to terms with that too.

    MS started a new business model. That's the main change since W7. It's a model aped from Apple and Google, don't blame MS for that, blame the vast majority of users who accepted and made it successful.

    That aside. What about the Control Panel x Settings? I'm sure Microsoft are big, wealthy and resourceful enough company to be able to migrate everything from the Control Panel into settings by the time Windows 10 hits commercial beta stage. So why haven't they done that?

    I assume it is anything but straightforward because the compatibility with the past, better to have everything working than eye pleasing.

    This is what means a "beta" to me

    You can't revolutionize everything just to please the eye, and this approach isn't a novelty. The full transition from 16bit to 32 bit lasted from win 3.xx to the XP era (it's almost a 10 years timeframe), just to name a similar transition. And surely W98 wasn't called beta just because it still used some 16 bit components.

    I guess I have to agree with you about newer generations and how this is aimed for them, but older generations still aren't dead! They should be kept in mind, until at least they reach 50 or so :D

    Older generations are still alive, and corporate needs are still alive as well, that's the reason behind the LTSB versions

    And last of all, I don't have a SSD, I have but one HDD that's 500GB and all my stuff are on it - C:\ is for Windows, D:\ is for everything else, so when I reinstall I can only format C:\ and keep everything else I have on D:

    So this hybrid boot thing doesn't do much for me, it's definitely intended for SSDs.

    The hybrid boot isn't an SSD only tech, nor is related to how your storage is organized.

    It's just a way to have a faster boot not saving the whole RAM on disk (like on hibernation) and not having to fully reinitialize everything (like on normal power on). It may have compatibility problems with older drivers/hw, hence can be disabled. But if it works it's pretty effective.

    And I would only get an SSD if it can be 1TB, but that's super expensive, so I will be holding off on that for a while.

    A cheap 128GB SSD is more than enough for the OS and most of the programs, then a second, big, traditional disk is more than sufficient for the storage.

    In short big SSD aren't needed at all, but lately you can get them for cheap as well

    For the record I just got a M2 1TB SSD for little more than 200$, it was for a friend, I don't mind to buy one of them, I don't need to keep movies, documents there.



  • So many words and so much vehemence against the Microsoft company. Does MS want Windows 10 to be successful OR does Microsoft want Windows 10 to conform to the original poster's wishes? Microsoft's Windows 10 is already successful and it continues to grow exponentially so it has no worries in that department. Most computers in the world run Windows and as older Windows systems are increasingly insecure and problematic, Windows 10 will be adopted. There is no question but that Windows 10 will become the most used operating system of all time.


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