64-Bit, Zero Disk Cache, Portable Sandbox



  • While I could have (and perhaps should have?) started three separate topics these do have some inter-related benefits -- and compose my '[i]pet wish[/i]' feature list for Vivaldi; all of which are technology related: · [b]Zero Disk Cache Option [/b](All Memory Cache) · [b]True Portable Sandbox Install Option[/b] · [b]64-Bit Verison[/b] A [b]Zero Disk Cache[/b] option would force Vivaldi to use Memory Cache or RAM for caching operations; this is a setting that will help maximize security and speed with available memory (similar to but could improve on the Disk and Memory cache options in Opera 12.xx). Many PCs and laptops have more then enough RAM to make this not only practical but a desirable configuration option -- web browsers can be very disk intensive and many might like the added benefit of minimizing SSD wear with an option like this. As well and some with slow laptop HDDs would enjoy the performance benefit. A true [b]Potable Sandbox Install Option[/b] would elevate the level of security using Vivaldi, and make using Vivaldi in a lot more scenarios more practical where other '[i]portable[/i]' browsers installations aren't truly sandboxed or portable -- they leave behind entires in the registry and files on the systems they were run on, and aren't sandboxed but in the most superficial manner. Done right a [b]64-Bit Verison[/b] of Vivaldi could of course thread better, be faster when doing multiple operations (running a lot of plug-ins, video, etc.), offer more stability, as well as make better use of system memory, easier optimization for Vivaldi's Developers once implemented, and add yet another layer of security. .



  • Nice suggestions, all of them could be really useful.



  • +10 to all. Was about to make a thread for a 64 bit preview request.



  • Thanks for the vote up. This early intensive focus we see on the forums on interface minutia when it appears the Vivaldi team not only have that well in hand but every intention of raising the bar is a little concerning.

    As well with projects like Otter Browser to throw a little competition in the mill (they already serve up 64-bit builds), it seems unlikey that the Vivaldi Team is going to have any trouble getting the interface in good shape.

    I first heard of Vivaldi on Linux Unplugged, a pod-cast venue that I'm sure would welcome Vivaldi Developers for an interview and get the project a lot of positive exposure. An important made on that show is how the 'browser has become the OS' – which is further reinforcement of underling technology having critical relevance with the direction things are going.



  • +1000, this is a must have. Thanks for pointing it out.



  • +1

    I think zero disk cache must come hand in hand with 64Bit.



  • The portable install option, and zero disk cache are part of what made the 64-bit version of Opera so secure.

    Now with many systems having well in excess of 8Gb of RAM, and few applications or even games that can use all that RAM it's a good time for Developers to be looking at offering Users easy options to take advantage of this.

    Of course some of the same thing can be done with a second party RAM disk; but these can be awkward to setup, behave badly, add an additional layer of complexity and it's far more efficient to integrate memory configuration options for those looking for them…



  • yes, zero writing to disk!
    this was/is impossible with opera 12.xx, it doesnt matter which settings you chose, there are always hundreds of files written in opcache, cache, temp download, icons etc..



  • +1 as well



  • @schreck:

    yes, zero writing to disk! this was/is impossible with opera 12.xx, it doesnt matter which settings you chose, there are always hundreds of files written in opcache, cache, temp download, icons etc..

    You are correct. And if fully implemented in Vivaldi, it would be nice to have some sort of option on exiting Vivaldi to 'Save State To Disk' and flush the works as the default secure option. A save state option that saved everything to a single cache file or archive and could optionally reload it on start would add yet another level of user control, security and tidy to such a feature.



  • Yes please! I came to support the 64bit part, as it's something I really want, but the others are nice to have as well.



  • @rem0te:

    Yes please! I came to support the 64bit part, as it's something I really want, but the others are nice to have as well.

    Yes, these are three features that 'play nice' together in other applications built with a portable installation option intended for high performance computing and security.

    It might be too ambitious to expect real FIPS 140-2 Level 4 secure sandboxing in portable installation of Vivaldi, but it wouldn't take much Developer effort to really raise the bar above the competition.

    As well true portable applications are very tidy and don't grunge up a Windows system with ton of crap files and a steaming pile of registry entires that can cause (or enable) all sorts of issues…



  • All of these are very much needed functions that I already use on other browsers (mainly gecko-based ones). Nowadays people have plenty of RAM installed (I have 12gb) so having half of it just "laying around useless" is not preferable. 64-bit brings security benefits and of course at least theoretic speed increase (with Chrome the 64-bit does indeed have much faster feel on it).

    Sandboxing is nice addition for those who need it, but there is also alternative sandboxing applications for those who want it. For example if you use Comodo AV/internet security, it is easy to sandbox entire applications, web browsers included. I think there is standalone softwares with similar functions too.



  • SSDs will thanks a lot for a zero disk cache.

    At least an easy option to move the disk cache would be nice, especially to move it on a RAM disk



  • @SamuelMaki:

    All of these are very much needed functions that I already use on other browsers (mainly gecko-based ones). Nowadays people have plenty of RAM installed (I have 12gb) so having half of it just "laying around useless" is not preferable. 64-bit brings security benefits and of course at least theoretic speed increase (with Chrome the 64-bit does indeed have much faster feel on it).

    Yes I, like you already do this with other browsers… And you're quite right; large RAM installations are wasted on most systems with very few applications or even games that address and are able to use anything above 6Gb, and above 8Gb virtually nothing happens unless you're running very expensive commercial CAD or media production applications.

    An enormous number of PCs are in essence idling a feature that offers no benefit except for revenue for memory producers. If Vivaldi were able to address this memory (ergo 64-bit), and had features like RAM caching, it could put a lot of useless RAM to good use, make for a browser that offers much more SOTA performance, that doesn't thrash a slow HDD, or add unnecessary wear to an SSD.

    @SamuelMaki:

    Sandboxing is nice addition for those who need it, but there is also alternative sandboxing applications for those who want it. For example if you use Comodo AV/internet security, it is easy to sandbox entire applications, web browsers included. I think there is standalone softwares with similar functions too.

    You are correct, there are some decent sand box applications, however it's much easier to a better job of sand boxing an application by design, especially a portable iteration of an application. As well it will be dramatically less of a resource pig that the typical sand box application, and will use virtually nothing more in the way resources then an application that doesn't integrate this kind of security.



  • @RRR13:

    So, if I run at the same time a browser that eats 2 gigs of RAM, a game that eats 4 gigs of RAM, a 3D modeling application that eats 2 gigs of RAM, the music player in the background, the video player on pause, etc., I'm just being brainwashed by memory producers or something? :lol:

    First of all your not describing a typical use case for how the vast majority of Windows Users use the OS, most don't use professional media production software, most consumer grade media software is not 64-bit (even when it claims to be), can not address RAM properly, and will have it's memory use 'managed' by the Windows memory manager, like most 32-bit applications.

    But rather than in idiotic, bickering digression that isn't even relevant to the thread test it out for yourself and see what really happens and what the Windows memory manager does on any version of Windows in a use case like this – trey an application like the Windows Task Manager to see for yourself.

    @RRR13:

    How about also running more instances of the same game at once? I've seen it done.

    Come on!? 'How about when people drive to work with eleven cars stacked on top of their car at once?! I've seen it done!' 9_9

    @RRR13:

    Running stuff in parallel, like most people do, is what eats RAM like crazy, not running just one application at a time, like in the old days of MS-DOS.

    REALLY! With remarks like this you obviously either have completely lost track of the intention of the thread, don't understand it, or are perhaps just trolling.

    If you're really, sincerely, and deeply concerned about addressing and using large amounts of memory on your system you'll obviously want Vivaldi and ALL your applications to be 64-bit. The rest of the discussion isn't for you, these aren't the droids you're looking for, move along…



  • Almost 2 years later, anyone knows if any progress is being made towards achieving that "Zero Disk Cache Option"? My SSD would love to have that - and me too.


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